JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Pharmacokinetics of single-agent axitinib across multiple solid tumor types.
Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Axitinib, a potent and selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, showed antitumor activity as a single agent against several solid tumor types in Phase II and III trials. This study was conducted to evaluate axitinib pharmacokinetics across a variety of solid tumors.
Related JoVE Video
A phase II study of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.
Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is recommended for use as first-line treatment for patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Unfortunately, 30-50 % of patients are ineligible for cisplatin due to renal insufficiency. Oxaliplatin is a less nephrotoxic platin which can be used for patients with impaired renal function. We carried out a phase II study of gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m²) in combination with oxaliplatin (100 mg/m²) given on days 1 and 14 every 28 days (GEMOX) in predominantly cisplatin-unfit stage IV transitional cell bladder cancer patients to determine whether this combination exhibited a clinical activity profile similar to cisplatin plus gemcitabine. Eighteen patients with a median GFR of 49 ml/min were enrolled. GEMOX treatment led to a 36 % response rate in assessable patients. Median progression-free survival was 4.9 months, with a median overall survival (OS) of 10.4 months and a one-year survival rate of 44.4 %. GEMOX in bladder cancer patients exhibited a tolerable side effects profile, with thrombocytopenia as the most frequent grade 3/4 toxicity. These findings suggest that GEMOX is an active combination in advanced bladder cancer patients with reduced renal function.
Related JoVE Video
BEAM: a randomized phase II study evaluating the activity of bevacizumab in combination with carboplatin plus paclitaxel in patients with previously untreated advanced melanoma.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Metastatic melanoma, a highly vascularized tumor with strong expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, has an overall poor prognosis. We conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II study of carboplatin plus paclitaxel with or without bevacizumab in patients with previously untreated metastatic melanoma.
Related JoVE Video
Multicenter, phase II study of axitinib, a selective second-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3, in patients with metastatic melanoma.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This multicenter, open-label, phase II study evaluated the safety and clinical activity of axitinib, a potent and selective second-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR)-1, 2, and 3, in patients with metastatic melanoma.
Related JoVE Video
Phase II clinical trial evaluating docetaxel, vinorelbine and GM-CSF in stage IV melanoma.
Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Metastatic melanoma patients have a poor prognosis. No chemotherapy regimen has improved overall survival. More effective treatments are needed. Docetaxel has clinical activity in melanoma and may be more active when combined with vinorelbine. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown activity as an adjuvant melanoma therapy. We carried out a phase II study of these agents in patients with stage IV melanoma.
Related JoVE Video
Diastolic blood pressure as a biomarker of axitinib efficacy in solid tumors.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To evaluate if diastolic blood pressure (dBP) ?90 mm Hg during axitinib treatment is a marker of efficacy.
Related JoVE Video
Lycopene enhances docetaxels effect in castration-resistant prostate cancer associated with insulin-like growth factor I receptor levels.
Neoplasia
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Docetaxel is currently the most effective drug for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), but it only extends life by an average of 2 months. Lycopene, an antioxidant phytochemical, has antitumor activity against prostate cancer (PCa) in several models and is generally safe. We present data on the interaction between docetaxel and lycopene in CRPC models. The growth-inhibitory effect of lycopene on PCa cell lines was positively associated with insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) levels. In addition, lycopene treatment enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of docetaxel more effectively on DU145 cells with IGF-IR high expression than on those PCa cell lines with IGF-IR low expression. In a DU145 xenograft tumor model, docetaxel plus lycopene caused tumor regression, with a 38% increase in antitumor efficacy (P = .047) when compared with docetaxel alone. Lycopene inhibited IGF-IR activation through inhibiting IGF-I stimulation and by increasing the expression and secretion of IGF-BP3. Downstream effects include inhibition of AKT kinase activity and survivin expression, followed by apoptosis. Together, the enhancement of docetaxels antitumor efficacy by lycopene supplementation justifies further clinical investigation of lycopene and docetaxel combination for CRPC patients. CRPC patients with IGF-IR-overexpressing tumors may be most likely to benefit from this combination.
Related JoVE Video
Anti-angiogenic effects of resveratrol mediated by decreased VEGF and increased TSP1 expression in melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture.
Angiogenesis
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, has been reported to be an anti-tumor and chemopreventive agent. Recent data show that it may also exert anti-angiogenic effects. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic activity of resveratrol may be caused by modulation of tumor cell release of thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into the extracellular matrix, leading to vascular endothelial cell (VEC) apoptosis. We therefore evaluated the effects of resveratrol on melanoma cell lines co-cultured with vascular endothelial cells in monolayer and in three dimensional spheroids. We found that resveratrol stimulated isolated VEC proliferation, while it caused growth inhibition of VECs grown with melanoma cells in three-dimensional co-culture. This effect was associated with increased melanoma cell expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 and matrix protein TSP1, as well as decreased hypoxia-driven expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1? and inhibition of VEGF production.
Related JoVE Video
Metronomic gemcitabine in combination with sunitinib inhibits multisite metastasis and increases survival in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Metronomic chemotherapy suppresses growth of primary tumors and established metastases. However, its effect on metastatic progression is essentially unknown. We report the treatment of a metastatically competent model of pancreatic cancer with metronomic gemcitabine and sunitinib. Mice with orthotopic, red fluorescent protein-expressing, pancreatic cancer tumorgrafts were treated with gemcitabine on a metronomic (1 mg/kg daily, METG) or maximum tolerated dose (150 mg/kg twice weekly, MTDG) schedule with or without sunitinib (SU). Rates of primary tumor growth, metastasis, ascites, and survival were calculated. Gemcitabine at a daily dose of 2 mg or greater led to toxicity within 1 month in mice without tumors but METG at 1 mg/kg/d was well tolerated. Mice with pancreatic cancer tumorgrafts died with metastatic disease at a median of 25 days. METG/SU significantly prolonged median overall survival (44 days) compared with control or either regimen alone (P < 0.05). Primary tumor growth was inhibited by METG/SU (P = 0.03) but neither METG nor sunitinib alone. In contrast, treatment with METG suppressed metastasis at multiple sites, an effect enhanced by sunitinib. MTDG with or without sunitinib had the most favorable effect on primary tumor growth and survival, but its antimetastatic efficacy was similar to that of METG/SU. von Willebrand factor expression was inhibited by METG. Antimetastatic activity approaching that of MTDG is achieved with a total dose reduced 42 times using METG and is further enhanced by sunitinib. Our results suggest the potential of this therapeutic paradigm against pancreatic cancer in the adjuvant and maintenance settings.
Related JoVE Video
Predictive and prognostic angiogenic markers in a gynecologic oncology group phase II trial of bevacizumab in recurrent and persistent ovarian or peritoneal cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Potential predictive/prognostic angiogenic markers were prospectively examined in a phase II trial of bevacizumab in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC)/primary peritoneal cancer (PPC).
Related JoVE Video
Prospective evaluation of an in vitro radiation resistance assay in locally advanced cancer of the uterine cervix: a Southwest Oncology Group Study.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To investigate the feasibility of performing a fresh-tissue, in vitro radiation resistance assay (IVRRA) in a cooperative group setting and to assess the association of IVRRA results with clinical outcomes.
Related JoVE Video
Targeted therapy in ovarian cancer.
J Oncol
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of mortality of tumors from gynecologic origin and is often diagnosed after patients have already progressed to advanced disease stage. The current standard of care for treatment of ovarian cancer includes cytoreductive surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, many patients will recur and ultimately die from their disease. Targeted therapies have been evaluated in ovarian cancer as a method to overcome resistant disease. Angiogenesis inhibitors have shown success in many tumor types and have also demonstrated promise in trials involving patients with ovarian cancer. PARP inhibitors may be potentially active agents in patients with BRCA-associated ovarian cancer. Trials that have evaluated combinations of targeted agents have often revealed untoward toxicities, thus tempering enthusiasm for this approach.
Related JoVE Video
Redox-related antimelanoma activity of ATN-224.
Melanoma Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Melanoma cells characteristically produce increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because of the metal-binding properties of melanin and loss of structural integrity of the melanosome. Agents that deplete gluthathione or inhibit superoxide dismutase, thereby blocking ROS scavenging mechanisms, may be selectively toxic to melanoma. To determine whether the inhibition of ROS scavenging could potentiate alkylator activity, we evaluated the activity of tetrathiomolybdate (ATN-224), a superoxide dismutase inhibitor, alone and in combination with temozolomide, on five melanoma cell lines. We also determined whether the ATN-224 would act synergistically with other agents that interfere with ROS scavenging. We found that the combination of ATN-224 and temozolomide generally exhibited additive cytotoxic effects on the cell lines tested. ATN-224 acted synergistically with buthionine sulfoximine, an agent that causes gluthathione depletion. Combinations of ATN-224 with arsenic trioxide, which may deplete glutathione, or disulfiram, an agent that interferes with recycling of glutathione, were antagonistic. These data suggest that strategically tailoring combination regimens that include ATN-224 and target ROS may be a viable approach to advance the treatment of melanoma.
Related JoVE Video
Prognostic relevance of carbonic anhydrase-IX in high-risk, early-stage cervical cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study aimed to determine whether carbonic anhydrase-IX (CA-IX) was associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in women with high-risk, early-stage cervical cancer treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy with or without radiosensitizing chemotherapy.
Related JoVE Video
Prediction of drug response in breast cancer using integrative experimental/computational modeling.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Nearly 30% of women with early-stage breast cancer develop recurrent disease attributed to resistance to systemic therapy. Prevailing models of chemotherapy failure describe three resistant phenotypes: cells with alterations in transmembrane drug transport, increased detoxification and repair pathways, and alterations leading to failure of apoptosis. Proliferative activity correlates with tumor sensitivity. Cell-cycle status, controlling proliferation, depends on local concentration of oxygen and nutrients. Although physiologic resistance due to diffusion gradients of these substances and drugs is a recognized phenomenon, it has been difficult to quantify its role with any accuracy that can be exploited clinically. We implement a mathematical model of tumor drug response that hypothesizes specific functional relationships linking tumor growth and regression to the underlying phenotype. The model incorporates the effects of local drug, oxygen, and nutrient concentrations within the three-dimensional tumor volume, and includes the experimentally observed resistant phenotypes of individual cells. We conclude that this integrative method, tightly coupling computational modeling with biological data, enhances the value of knowledge gained from current pharmacokinetic measurements, and, further, that such an approach could predict resistance based on specific tumor properties and thus improve treatment outcome.
Related JoVE Video
Markers of angiogenesis in high-risk, early-stage cervical cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To determine whether markers of tumor angiogenesis were associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in women with high-risk, early-stage cervical cancer treated on a phase III trial.
Related JoVE Video
Thrombospondin-1 expression in melanoma is blocked by methylation and targeted reversal by 5-Aza-deoxycytidine suppresses angiogenesis.
Matrix Biol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Reversibility of aberrant methylation via pharmacological means is an attractive target for therapies through epigenetic reprogramming. To establish that pharmacologic reversal of methylation could result in functional inhibition of angiogenesis, we undertook in vitro and in vivo studies of thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), a known inhibitor of angiogenesis. TSP1 is methylated in several malignancies, and can inhibit angiogenesis in melanoma xenografts. We analyzed effects of 5-Aza-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC) on melanoma cells in vitro to confirm reversal of promoter hypermethylation and restoration of TSP1 expression. We then investigated the effects of TSP1 expression on new blood vessel formation and tumor growth in vivo. Finally, to determine potential for clinical translation, the methylation status of TSP1 promoter regions of nevi and melanoma tissues was investigated.
Related JoVE Video
Changes in tumor blood flow as measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) may predict activity of single agent bevacizumab in recurrent epithelial ovarian (EOC) and primary peritoneal cancer (PPC) patients: an exploratory a
Gynecol. Oncol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To explore feasibility of measuring tumor blood flow as marker for antiangiogenic activity using DCE-MRI (Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in women with recurrent EOC/PPC treated with bevacizumab.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.