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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Quiet please! Drug round tabards: are they effective and accepted? A mixed method study.
J Nurs Scholarsh
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2014
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The use of drug round tabards is a widespread intervention that is implemented to reduce the number of interruptions and medication administration errors (MAEs) by nurses; however, evidence for their effectiveness is scarce.
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Preventable Errors with Nonopioid Analgesics and Antiemetic Drugs May Increase Burden in Surgical Pediatric Patients.
Eur J Pediatr Surg
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2013
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Introduction Many hospitalized patients are affected by medication errors (MEs) that may cause discomfort, harm, and even death. Especially, children are considered to be at high risk of experiencing harm due to MEs. More insight into the prevalence, type, and severity of harm caused by MEs could help reduce the frequency of these harmful events. The primary objectives of our study were to establish the prevalence of different types of MEs and the severity of harm caused by MEs in hospitalized children from birth to 18 years of age. In addition, we investigated correlations between harmful MEs and characteristics of the collected data from 426 hospitalized children admitted, and the medication process.Methods In this cross-sectional study, we identified MEs by reviewing clinical records, making direct observations, monitoring pharmacy logs, and reviewing voluntary incident reports. Subsequently, the MEs were classified according to type of error, medication group and stage of the medication process. Pediatricians rated the severity of the observed harm.Results We collected data from 426 hospitalized children admitted during August to October 2011. A total of 322 MEs were identified, of which 39 caused patient harm. Harmful events were mainly because of wrong time (41%). Pediatricians rated the observed harm as minor in 77% of the incidents and significant in 23%. None of the harmful MEs resulted in permanent harm or was considered life-threatening or fatal. Patients admitted for a surgical procedure were at higher risk for a harmful event compared with patients admitted for nonsurgical reasons (adjusted odds ratio 2.79, 95% confidence interval; 1.35-5.80). Nonopioid analgesics and antiemetic drugs accounted for 67% of the harmful MEs. Harmful MEs occurred most frequently during medication prescription (28%) and administration (62%).Conclusion Surgical pediatric patients seem to be at high risk for harmful MEs. Although the harm was considered minor in most cases, it still caused discomfort for the patients, and the high prevalence is a source of concern. Interventions to prevent the MEs should focus on the prescription and administration of nonopioid analgesics and antiemetic drugs.
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High-alert medications for pediatric patients: an international modified Delphi study.
Expert Opin Drug Saf
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2013
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The available knowledge about high-alert medications for children is limited. Because children are particularly vulnerable to medication errors, a list of high-alert medication specifically for children would help to develop effective strategies to prevent patient harm. Therefore, we conducted an international modified Delphi study and validated the results with reports on medication incidents in children based on national data.
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Hepatitis E virus: an underestimated opportunistic pathogen in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2013
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Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is increasingly acknowledged as a cause of hepatitis in healthy individuals as well as immunocompromised patients. Little is known of HEV infection in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). Therefore, we set out to study the incidence and sequelae of HEV as a cause of hepatitis in a recent cohort of 328 alloHSCT recipients. HEV RNA was tested in episodes of liver enzyme abnormalities. In addition, HEV RNA and HEV serology were assessed pre- and post-alloHSCT. We found 8 cases (2.4%) of HEV infection, of which 5 had developed chronic HEV infection. Seroprevalence pre-alloHSCT was 13%. Four patients died with HEV viremia, with signs of ongoing hepatitis, having a median time of infection of 4.1 months. The 4 surviving patients cleared HEV after a median period of 6.3 months. One patient was diagnosed with HEV reactivation after a preceding infection prior to alloHSCT. Although the incidence of developing acute HEV post-alloHSCT is relatively low, the probability of developing chronic hepatitis in severely immunocompromised patients is high. Therefore, alloHSCT recipients should be screened pretransplantation by HEV serology and RNA. Furthermore, a differential diagnosis including hepatitis E is mandatory in all alloHSCT patients with severe liver enzyme abnormalities.
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Abusive head trauma in young children in the Netherlands: evidence for multiple incidents of abuse.
Acta Paediatr.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2013
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We investigated the prevalence of risk factors for and the prevalence of prior abuse in abusive head trauma victims in the Netherlands.
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Molecular assays for quantitative and qualitative detection of influenza virus and oseltamivir resistance mutations.
J Mol Diagn
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2013
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Sensitive and reproducible molecular assays are essential for influenza virus diagnostics. This manuscript describes the design, validation, and evaluation of a set of real-time RT-PCR assays for quantification and subtyping of human influenza viruses from patient respiratory material. Four assays are included for detection of oseltamivir resistance mutations H275Y in prepandemic and pandemic influenza A/H1N1 and E119V and R292K in influenza A/H3N2 neuraminidase. The lower limits of detection of the quantification assay were determined to be 1.7 log(10) virus particles per milliliter (vp/mL) for influenza A and 2.2 log(10) vp/mL for influenza B virus. The lower limits of quantification were 2.1 and 2.3 log(10) vp/mL, respectively. The RT-PCR efficiencies and lower limits of detection of the quantification assays were only marginally affected when tested on the most dissimilar target sequences found in the GenBank database. Finally, the resistance RT-PCR assays detected at least 5% mutant viruses present in mixtures containing both wild-type and mutant viruses with approximated limits of detection of 2.4 log(10) vp/mL. Overall, this set of RT-PCR assays is a powerful tool for enhanced influenza virus surveillance.
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What brings children home? A prognostic study to predict length of hospitalisation.
Eur. J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2013
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Adequate discharge planning could improve patient health and reduce readmissions. Increased accessibility and adequate use of hospital capacity are asking for an adequate discharge planning by means of efficient prediction of length of stay (LOS). Predictive factors of LOS for paediatric patients are lacking in the current available evidence. We aimed to identify these predictive factors in order to predict an optimal LOS. We conducted a prognostic study of all patients admitted to five different paediatric wards of Emma Childrens Hospital, a tertiary university hospital in the Netherlands. We investigated possible predictive factors based on the literature and an expert panel categorised in patient characteristics and medical and non-medical factors. This preliminary list was scored for all patients at the moment of discharge. All significant or relevant factors were used in a linear regression model to predict the LOS. We included 142 patients and explored the relationship between 28 variables, reflecting a mix of patient characteristics, medical and non-medical factors and LOS. In a univariable analysis, 17 variables were significantly related with LOS. Multivariable analysis found seven independent variables: sex, age category, specialism, risk of malnutrition, complications, home care and the involvement of other disciplines. These seven variables explained 48 % of the LOS (R(2) of 0.476).
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Competencies of specialised wound care nurses: a European Delphi study.
Int Wound J
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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Health care professionals responsible for patients with complex wounds need a particular level of expertise and education to ensure optimum wound care. However, uniform education for those working as wound care nurses is lacking. We aimed to reach consensus among experts from six European countries as to the competencies for specialised wound care nurses that meet international professional expectations and educational systems. Wound care experts including doctors, wound care nurses, lecturers, managers and head nurses were invited to contribute to an e-Delphi study. They completed online questionnaires based on the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists framework. Suggested competencies were rated on a 9-point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as an agreement of at least 75% for each competence. Response rates ranged from 62% (round 1) to 86% (rounds 2 and 3). The experts reached consensus on 77 (80%) competences. Most competencies chosen belonged to the domain scholar (n?=?19), whereas few addressed those associated with being a health advocate (n?=?7). Competencies related to professional knowledge and expertise, ethical integrity and patient commitment were considered most important. This consensus on core competencies for specialised wound care nurses may help achieve a more uniform definition and education of specialised wound care nurses.
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Case report: oseltamivir-induced resistant pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in a patient with AIDS and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.
J. Med. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia is the main cause of severe respiratory failure in patients with advanced HIV disease who do not receive P. jirovecii prophylaxis. Other aetiological agents may contribute to the respiratory failure in these patients, which is highlighted by the case described below: A patient with advanced HIV disease was treated for a dual-infection with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and P. jirovecii. Initially, his condition improved, but deteriorated after the emergence of oseltamivir-resistant influenza virus. This is the first documented case of emergence of drug-resistant influenza virus in a patient infected with HIV with a pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and P. jirovecii double infection.
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Evidence-based practice: a survey among pediatric nurses and pediatricians.
J Pediatr Nurs
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This survey compared the attitude, awareness, and knowledge of pediatric nurses and pediatricians regarding evidence-based practice (EBP). Potential barriers were also investigated. Both nurses and pediatricians welcomed EBP (mean scores are 73.3 and 75.4 out of 100). Overall, 52% of the nurses and 36% of the pediatricians did not know relevant sources of information, and 62% of the nurses versus 19% of the pediatricians did not know common EBP terms. Time constraints and lack of knowledge were considered as major barriers. Recommendations include multilevel training and continuous exchange of information.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.