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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Modelling biological behaviours with the unified modelling language: an immunological case study and critique.
J R Soc Interface
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2014
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We present a framework to assist the diagrammatic modelling of complex biological systems using the unified modelling language (UML). The framework comprises three levels of modelling, ranging in scope from the dynamics of individual model entities to system-level emergent properties. By way of an immunological case study of the mouse disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we show how the framework can be used to produce models that capture and communicate the biological system, detailing how biological entities, interactions and behaviours lead to higher-level emergent properties observed in the real world. We demonstrate how the UML can be successfully applied within our framework, and provide a critique of UML's ability to capture concepts fundamental to immunology and biology more generally. We show how specialized, well-explained diagrams with less formal semantics can be used where no suitable UML formalism exists. We highlight UML's lack of expressive ability concerning cyclic feedbacks in cellular networks, and the compounding concurrency arising from huge numbers of stochastic, interacting agents. To compensate for this, we propose several additional relationships for expressing these concepts in UML's activity diagram. We also demonstrate the ambiguous nature of class diagrams when applied to complex biology, and question their utility in modelling such dynamic systems. Models created through our framework are non-executable, and expressly free of simulation implementation concerns. They are a valuable complement and precursor to simulation specifications and implementations, focusing purely on thoroughly exploring the biology, recording hypotheses and assumptions, and serve as a communication medium detailing exactly how a simulation relates to the real biology.
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A Petri Net Model of Granulomatous Inflammation: Implications for IL-10 Mediated Control of Leishmania donovani Infection.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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Experimental visceral leishmaniasis, caused by infection of mice with the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, is characterized by focal accumulation of inflammatory cells in the liver, forming discrete "granulomas" within which the parasite is eventually eliminated. To shed new light on fundamental aspects of granuloma formation and function, we have developed an in silico Petri net model that simulates hepatic granuloma development throughout the course of infection. The model was extensively validated by comparison with data derived from experimental studies in mice, and the model robustness was assessed by a sensitivity analysis. The model recapitulated the progression of disease as seen during experimental infection and also faithfully predicted many of the changes in cellular composition seen within granulomas over time. By conducting in silico experiments, we have identified a previously unappreciated level of inter-granuloma diversity in terms of the development of anti-leishmanial activity. Furthermore, by simulating the impact of IL-10 gene deficiency in a variety of lymphocyte and myeloid cell populations, our data suggest a dominant local regulatory role for IL-10 produced by infected Kupffer cells at the core of the granuloma.
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In silico investigation into dendritic cell regulation of CD8Treg mediated killing of Th1 cells in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis has been used extensively as an animal model of T cell mediated autoimmunity. A down-regulatory pathway through which encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells are killed by CD8 regulatory T cells (Treg) has recently been proposed. With the CD8Treg cells being primed by dendritic cells, regulation of recovery may be occuring around these antigen presenting cells. CD4Treg cells provide critical help within this process, by licensing dendritic cells to prime CD8Treg cells, however the spatial and temporal aspects of this help in the CTL response is currently unclear.
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In silico investigation of novel biological pathways: the role of CD200 in regulation of T cell priming in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
BioSystems
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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The use of simulation to investigate biological domains will inevitably lead to the need to extend existing simulations as new areas of these domains become more fully understood. Such simulation extensions can entail the incorporation of additional cell types, molecules or molecular pathways, all of which can exert a profound influence on the simulation behaviour. Where the biological domain is not well characterised, a structured development methodology must be employed to ensure that the extended simulation is well aligned with its predecessor. We develop and discuss such a methodology, relying on iterative simulation development and sensitivity analysis. The utility of this methodology is demonstrated using a case study simulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine T cell-mediated autoimmune disease model of multiple sclerosis, where it is used to investigate the activity of an additional regulatory pathway. We discuss how application of this methodology guards against creating inappropriate simulation representations of the biology when investigating poorly characterised biological mechanisms.
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Spartan: a comprehensive tool for understanding uncertainty in simulations of biological systems.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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Integrating computer simulation with conventional wet-lab research has proven to have much potential in furthering the understanding of biological systems. Success requires the relationship between simulation and the real-world system to be established: substantial aspects of the biological system are typically unknown, and the abstract nature of simulation can complicate interpretation of in silico results in terms of the biology. Here we present spartan (Simulation Parameter Analysis RToolkit ApplicatioN), a package of statistical techniques specifically designed to help researchers understand this relationship and provide novel biological insight. The tools comprising spartan help identify which simulation results can be attributed to the dynamics of the modelled biological system, rather than artefacts of biological uncertainty or parametrisation, or simulation stochasticity. Statistical analyses reveal the influence that pathways and components have on simulation behaviour, offering valuable biological insight into aspects of the system under study. We demonstrate the power of spartan in providing critical insight into aspects of lymphoid tissue development in the small intestine through simulation. Spartan is released under a GPLv2 license, implemented within the open source R statistical environment, and freely available from both the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) and http://www.cs.york.ac.uk/spartan. The techniques within the package can be applied to traditional ordinary or partial differential equation simulations as well as agent-based implementations. Manuals, comprehensive tutorials, and example simulation data upon which spartan can be applied are available from the website.
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Functional complexity of the Leishmania granuloma and the potential of in silico modeling.
Front Immunol
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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In human and canine visceral leishmaniasis and in various experimental models of this disease, host resistance is strongly linked to efficient granuloma development. However, it is unknown exactly how the granuloma microenvironment executes an effective antileishmanial response. Recent studies, including using advanced imaging techniques, have improved our understanding of granuloma biology at the cellular level, highlighting heterogeneity in granuloma development and function, and hinting at complex cellular, temporal, and spatial dynamics. In this mini-review, we discuss the factors involved in the formation and function of Leishmania donovani-induced hepatic granulomas, as well as their importance in protecting against inflammation-associated tissue damage and the generation of immunity to rechallenge. Finally, we discuss the role that computational, agent-based models may play in answering outstanding questions within the field.
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Determining disease intervention strategies using spatially resolved simulations.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Predicting efficacy and optimal drug delivery strategies for small molecule and biological therapeutics is challenging due to the complex interactions between diverse cell types in different tissues that determine disease outcome. Here we present a new methodology to simulate inflammatory disease manifestation and test potential intervention strategies in silico using agent-based computational models. Simulations created using this methodology have explicit spatial and temporal representations, and capture the heterogeneous and stochastic cellular behaviours that lead to emergence of pathology or disease resolution. To demonstrate this methodology we have simulated the prototypic murine T cell-mediated autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. In the simulation immune cell dynamics, neuronal damage and tissue specific pathology emerge, closely resembling behaviour found in the murine model. Using the calibrated simulation we have analysed how changes in the timing and efficacy of T cell receptor signalling inhibition leads to either disease exacerbation or resolution. The technology described is a powerful new method to understand cellular behaviours in complex inflammatory disease, permits rational design of drug interventional strategies and has provided new insights into the role of TCR signalling in autoimmune disease progression.
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Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level.
Curr Top Med Chem
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2011
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The G-protein coupled receptors--or GPCRs--comprise simultaneously one of the largest and one of the most multi-functional protein families known to modern-day molecular bioscience. From a drug discovery and pharmaceutical industry perspective, the GPCRs constitute one of the most commercially and economically important groups of proteins known. The GPCRs undertake numerous vital metabolic functions and interact with a hugely diverse range of small and large ligands. Many different methodologies have been developed to efficiently and accurately classify the GPCRs. These range from motif-based techniques to machine learning as well as a variety of alignment-free techniques based on the physiochemical properties of sequences. We review here the available methodologies for the classification of GPCRs. Part of this work focuses on how we have tried to build the intrinsically hierarchical nature of sequence relations, implicit within the family, into an adaptive approach to classification. Importantly, we also allude to some of the key innate problems in developing an effective approach to classifying the GPCRs: the lack of sequence similarity between the six classes that comprise the GPCR family and the low sequence similarity to other family members evinced by many newly revealed members of the family.
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Elucidation of T cell signalling models.
J. Theor. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2009
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A potential mechanism that allows T cells to reliably discriminate pMHC ligands involves an interplay between kinetic proofreading, negative feedback and a destruction of this negative feedback. We analyse a detailed model of these mechanisms which involves the TCR, SHP1 and ERK. We discover that the behaviour of pSHP1 negative feedback is of primary importance, and particularly the influence of a kinetic proofreading base negative feedback state on pSHP1 dynamics. The CD8 co-receptor is shown to benefit from a kinetic proofreading locking mechanism and is able to overcome pSHP1 negative influences to sensitise a T cell.
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Differential RET signaling pathways drive development of the enteric lymphoid and nervous systems.
Sci Signal
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During the early development of the gastrointestinal tract, signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase RET is required for initiation of lymphoid organ (Peyers patch) formation and for intestinal innervation by enteric neurons. RET signaling occurs through glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family receptor ? co-receptors present in the same cell (signaling in cis). It is unclear whether RET signaling in trans, which occurs in vitro through co-receptors from other cells, has a biological role. We showed that the initial aggregation of hematopoietic cells to form lymphoid clusters occurred in a RET-dependent, chemokine-independent manner through adhesion-mediated arrest of lymphoid tissue initiator (LTin) cells. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells were not necessary for this initiation phase. LTin cells responded to all RET ligands in trans, requiring factors from other cells, whereas RET was activated in enteric neurons exclusively by GDNF in cis. Furthermore, genetic and molecular approaches revealed that the versatile RET responses in LTin cells were determined by distinct patterns of expression of the genes encoding RET and its co-receptors. Our study shows that a trans RET response in LTin cells determines the initial phase of enteric lymphoid organ morphogenesis, and suggests that differential co-expression of Ret and Gfra can control the specificity of RET signaling.
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Pairing experimentation and computational modeling to understand the role of tissue inducer cells in the development of lymphoid organs.
Front Immunol
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The use of genetic tools, imaging technologies and ex vivo culture systems has provided significant insights into the role of tissue inducer cells and associated signaling pathways in the formation and function of lymphoid organs. Despite advances in experimental technologies, the molecular and cellular process orchestrating the formation of a complex three-dimensional tissue is difficult to dissect using current approaches. Therefore, a robust set of simulation tools have been developed to model the processes involved in lymphoid tissue development. Specifically, the role of different tissue inducer cell populations in the dynamic formation of Peyers patches has been examined. Utilizing approaches from systems engineering, an unbiased model of lymphoid tissue inducer cell function has been developed that permits the development of emerging behaviors that are statistically not different from that observed in vivo. These results provide the confidence to utilize statistical methods to explore how the simulator predicts cellular behavior and outcomes under different physiological conditions. Such methods, known as sensitivity analysis techniques, can provide insight into when a component part of the system (such as a particular cell type, adhesion molecule, or chemokine) begins to have an influence on observed behavior, and quantifies the effect a component part has on the end result: the formation of lymphoid tissue. Through use of such a principled approach in the design, calibration, and analysis of a computer simulation, a robust in silico tool can be developed which can both further the understanding of a biological system being explored, and act as a tool for the generation of hypotheses which can be tested utilizing experimental approaches.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.