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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Preventing occupational stress in healthcare workers.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2014
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Healthcare workers can suffer from occupational stress as a result of lack of skills, organisational factors, and low social support at work. which may lead to distress, burnout and psychosomatic problems, and deterioration in quality of life and service provision.
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Pharmacological interventions for sleepiness and sleep disturbances caused by shift work.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2014
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Shift work results in sleep-wake disturbances, which cause sleepiness during night shifts and reduce sleep length and quality in daytime sleep after the night shift. In its serious form it is also called shift work sleep disorder. Various pharmacological products are used to ameliorate symptoms of sleepiness or poor sleep length and quality.
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Topical anti-inflammatory agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face or scalp.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2014
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Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder affecting primarily the skin of the scalp, face, chest, and intertriginous areas, causing scaling and redness of the skin. Current treatment options include antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and keratolytic agents, as well as phototherapy.
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Gloves, extra gloves or special types of gloves for preventing percutaneous exposure injuries in healthcare personnel.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Healthcare workers are at risk of acquiring viral diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV through exposure to contaminated blood and body fluids at work. Most often infection occurs when a healthcare worker inadvertently punctures the skin of their hand with a sharp implement that has been used in the treatment of an infected patient, thus bringing the patient's blood into contact with their own. Such occurrences are commonly known as percutaneous exposure incidents.
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Devices for preventing percutaneous exposure injuries caused by needles in healthcare personnel.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Needlestick injuries from devices used for blood collection or for injections expose healthcare workers to the risk of blood borne infections such as hepatitis B and C, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Safety features such as shields or retractable needles can possibly contribute to the prevention of these injuries and it is important to evaluate their effectiveness.
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Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss: a Cochrane systematic review.
Int J Audiol
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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To assess the effectiveness of interventions for preventing occupational noise exposure or hearing loss compared to no intervention or alternative interventions.
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Inclusion of nonrandomized studies in Cochrane systematic reviews was found to be in need of improvement.
J Clin Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2014
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Nonrandomized studies (NRSs) are considered to provide less reliable evidence for intervention effects. However, these are included in Cochrane reviews, despite discouragement. There has been no evaluation of when and how these designs are used. Therefore, we conducted an overview of current practice.
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An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain.
Ann Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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We developed an evidence-based practice guideline to support occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals in assessing the risk due to lifting and in selecting effective preventive measures for low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. The guideline was developed at the request of the Dutch government by a project team of experts and OSH professionals in lifting and work-related LBP. The recommendations for risk assessment were based on the quality of instruments to assess the risk on LBP due to lifting. Recommendations for interventions were based on a systematic review of the effects of worker- and work directed interventions to reduce back load due to lifting. The quality of the evidence was rated as strong (A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on consensus (D). Finally, eight experts and twenty-four OSH professionals commented on and evaluated the content and the feasibility of the preliminary guideline. For risk assessment we recommend loads heavier than 25 kg always to be considered a risk for LBP while loads less than 3 kg do not pose a risk. For loads between 3-25 kg, risk assessment shall be performed using the Manual handling Assessment Charts (MAC)-Tool or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. Effective work oriented interventions are patient lifting devices (Level A) and lifting devices for goods (Level C), optimizing working height (Level A) and reducing load mass (Level C). Ineffective work oriented preventive measures are regulations to ban lifting without proper alternatives (Level D). We do not recommend worker-oriented interventions but consider personal lift assist devices as promising (Level C). Ineffective worker-oriented preventive measures are training in lifting technique (Level A), use of back-belts (Level A) and pre-employment medical examinations (Level A). This multidisciplinary evidence-based practice guideline gives clear criteria whether an employee is at risk for LBP while lifting and provides an easy-reference for (in)effective risk reduction measures based on scientific evidence, experience, and consensus among OSH experts and practitioners.
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Randomized controlled trials are needed to close the evidence gap in the prevention of preterm birth.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2013
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Prematurity (<37 weeks gestation) is among the major determinants of infant morbidity and mortality (1). Within developing countries, where the condition is of major public health importance, incidence is around 19% versus 5-7% in developed nations (2). The global estimation of preterm delivery in 2005 was 9.6% of all births, which is a total of 12.9 million, 11 million of which were from Africa and Asia. About 28% of infant deaths occurring within the first seven days of life are a result of prematurity (3). Apart from the negative health implications of prematurity, the monetary cost is very alarming, with America alone spending over $26.2 billion on medical and educational interventions in addition to the cost of productivity loss (3). Despite global and local achievements in the survival rate of premature infants, the rate of prematurity keeps rising (4). The role of women in society has changed dramatically as today´s woman has a higher chance of going to school and getting employed outside the home than her mother (5). There is plausibility of heavy lifting (>5 days per week) in the causal pathway of premature delivery (6). Long working hours and heavy lifting are alleged to be associated with preterm delivery (7). Whilst some studies conclude there is a causal link between heavy lifting and preterm birth, another study concluded that, regardless of the exposure periods and the frequency of lifting, there is no significant association between heavy lifting and preterm birth (8). In a recent National Birth Cohort in Denmark, researchers published in the Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health concluded that occupational lifting of medium-to-heavy loads can lead to pelvic pain during pregnancy (9) whilst pelvic pain is a common signal of labor initiation. Interventions, such as health education, maternity leave, or reassignment to a less-physical task, are already in place in most Western countries to prevent exposure to heavy lifting at work among pregnant women. However, it is unclear which intervention produces better pregnancy outcomes. A systematic review (10) on the effects of bed rest as a preventive measure of preterm birth compared to no intervention among high-risk singleton pregnant women found no evidence to support this preventive measure. No other reviews on the comparative effectiveness of preventive measures for heavy lifting in preventing preterm birth were found. We therefore performed a systematic review of the published literature to locate evaluation studies of interventions to prevent heavy lifting during pregnancy. We searched for randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCT/quasi RCT) comprising pregnant employees exposed to lifting tasks, which evaluated an intervention aimed at decreasing lifting exposure and the effects on the incidence of prematurity. Based on these inclusion criteria we developed a search strategy and searched the databases Medline (via PubMed), Scopus, and CINAHL up to 28 June 2012 (see appendix for full search strategy). Two authors independently scrutinized the references for eligible trials but none fulfilled our inclusion criteria. A further search of reference lists of potentially relevant studies also failed to identify any RCT. Thus, the hypothesis that an intervention that decreases heavy lifting exposure among pregnant woman may have a positive impact on pregnancy outcomes could be not proven either right or wrong. We went strictly for RCT because of the quality in terms of study design (11) as rigorous procedures are carried out to establish the cause and effect relationship between an outcome and intervention (12). Nevertheless, our search did yield five observational studies that did not fit the inclusion criteria (RCT, pregnant employees as subjects, exposure to heavy-lifting tasks, and an intervention aiming at decreasing lifting exposure). Three of the studies investigated a causal association between preterm birth and heavy lifting whilst two were intervention studies. The three exposure studies (6, 13, 14) indicated a negative impact of occupational exposure to strenuous physical activities on gestational age. One literature review suggested that exercise could be beneficial and an observational evaluation study concluded that current legislation in Germany sufficiently protects pregnant women against preterm birth (15, 16). However, their lack of validity and greater margins of errors associated with the studies designs make it difficult to rely on these observational studies. Existing systematic reviews of exposure are inconclusive on the subject matter. A meta-analysis indicated a statistically significant association between preterm birth and physically demanding work (5). Similarly, a systematic review (17) suggested a possible association between lifting and prematurity. In contradiction to these results, a third systematic review (18) refuted an association between lifting, especially during the first trimester, and premature delivery. This review was recently updated and came to similar conclusions (19). In spite of this, another Scand J Work Environ Health systematic review of the risk of miscarriage due to exposure to lifting during pregnancy cautions against lifting high loads during pregnancy (20). A phenomenon that characterized the identified primary studies was misclassification of exposure. The flaws in the estimation of especially the exposure severely hamper the drawing of strong conclusions in these studies and reviews. In almost all the studies, women self-reported their lifting exposure retrospectively or prospectively. It is unsure if the subjective measurement of exposure leads to non-differential misclassification. It has been argued that differential misclassification usually leads to an underestimation of the relation between exposure and outcome if there is any, but this is surrounded by uncertainty especially when exposure is on a continuous scale (21). It could be that misclassification is differential in case-control studies. Among cases, lifting exposure could be better remembered and reported as a result of recall bias. Therefore, there is a need for a high quality evaluation study in which a group of pregnant women with heavy lifting exposure are subjected to an intervention that decreases the exposure while a second group of unexposed women serves as a control. Such a study would provide reliable evidence for both an effect of the intervention and a causal relation (22). There are several possible explanations for the absence of high quality studies to support practice. To start, financial support is a major factor in every research. A substantial amount of money is required to conduct a high quality study. In low- and middle-income countries, where strenuous physical activity and premature birth are common occurrences (3, 6), access to finance to conduct research is always a challenge as evidenced by the "10/90 gap", which indicates only 10% of global resources are earmarked for health research addressing 90% of global disease burden (23). Secondly, ethical considerations can also be a limiting factor. Human lives are involved and there may be ethical issues as to who should and should not be advised to avoid heavy lifting given the current uncertainty about the evidence necessitating precautionary measures (5). Thirdly, an RCT requires recruitment of participants from the first trimester to determine the consequences of varied exposure to strenuous work during the three different trimesters, however, the chances of attrition can be high due to the length of the study. Finally, in high income countries where health research is more common, there already exists legislation on maternity leave that protects pregnant women and therefore researchers may not have enough motivation to carry out such studies. Education to decrease physical activity during pregnancy has been shown to be effective for improving patients outcome and the prevention of unwanted occurrences such as prematurity (24). However, there is currently no evidence to support or refute its implementation for women who are exposed to lifting during pregnancy. Due to the aforementioned inconclusive nature and the methodological flaws in available studies, an RCT is needed to fill the gap. Such an ideal future RCT would hypothesize a reduction in the incidence of preterm birth among pregnant women who receive an intervention to avoid heavy lifting. The intervention could consist of health education pointing out the possibilities to avoid heavy lifting during pregnancy. The study should be a prospective two-arm RCT that is parallel and pragmatic to ascertain the effectiveness of the intervention. Looking at the global trends of premature birth, the appropriate trial must be centered within Asia or Africa because these continents have the highest proportions of preterm birth of 54% and 31%, respectively, in the world (3). Recruitment of participants could be done with the assistance of staff of antenatal clinics. Eligibility criteria for participants could be: women whose pregnancy has not gone beyond 12 weeks, singleton pregnancy, and women who are exposed to heavy lifting (?10 kg) either at home or at work ?10 times per day. Eligible participants would be assigned to either the experimental or control group at different antenatal clinics using an appropriate randomization method. Proper randomization will generate two groups that are equal in known and unknown extraneous variables with the exception of the intervention. To prevent contamination of the control group with the treatment of the intervention group when they are both attending the same clinic, randomization of antenatal clinics with their patients to either the intervention or the control group in a cluster randomized design would be desirable. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)
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A work-directed intervention to enhance the return to work of employees with cancer: A case study.
Work
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2013
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The purpose of this case study was to describe how the return-to-work process evolved in an employee with cancer in the Netherlands and how a work-directed intervention supported this process. The patient was a 35-year old female employee diagnosed with cervix carcinoma. After surgery, the patient experienced depression, fatigue, fear of recurrence, and low mental working capacity. Communication with the occupational physician was difficult. A social worker at the hospital provided three counselling sessions aimed to support return to work and sent letters to the occupational physician to improve the communication. The support by the social worker helped the patient to resume work gradually and the sending of information from the treating physician and social worker improved the communication with the occupational physician. This resulted in the patient being able to achieve lasting return to work. This work-directed intervention was highly valued by the patient and could be an important addition to usual psycho-oncological care for employees with cancer.
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Occupational safety and health enforcement tools for preventing occupational diseases and injuries.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2013
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There is uncertainty as to whether and what extent occupational safety and health regulation and legislation enforcement activities, such as inspections, are effective and efficient to improve workers health and safety. We use the term regulation to refer both to regulation and legislation.
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Physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy to reduce sickness absence for workers with back pain.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2013
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Physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy aims to improve work status for workers on sick leave due to back pain. This is the second update of a Cochrane Review (originally titled Work conditioning, work hardening and functional restoration for workers with back and neck pain) first published in 2003, updated in 2010, and updated again in 2013.
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Remediating buildings damaged by dampness and mould for preventing or reducing respiratory tract symptoms, infections and asthma (Review).
Evid Based Child Health
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2013
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Dampness and mould in buildings have been associated with adverse respiratory symptoms, asthma and respiratory infections of inhabitants. Moisture damage is a very common problem in private houses, workplaces and public buildings such as schools.
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Measurement properties of the Work Limitations Questionnaire were sufficient among cancer survivors.
Qual Life Res
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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The purpose of this study was to determine reproducibility, validity, and responsiveness of the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) among cancer survivors.
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Night-shift work and breast cancer--a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2013
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The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence on the potential relationship between nightshift work and breast cancer.
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Essential Occupational Safety and Health Interventions for Low- and Middle-income Countries: An Overview of the Evidence.
Saf Health Work
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2013
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There is still a considerable burden of occupational diseases and injuries in the world. It is not well known which interventions can effectively reduce the exposures at work that cause this burden. The objective of this article is to summarize evidence from systematic reviews of interventions to prevent occupational diseases and injuries. We included systematic reviews of interventions to reduce the incidence of work-related cancer, dust-related diseases, occupational asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, noiseinduced hearing loss, back pain, and occupational injuries. We searched Medline and Embase with predefined search strategies to locate systematic reviews of these interventions. We found 23 systematic reviews of which the results are also applicable to low- and middle income countries. Effective measures to reduce exposure leading to work-related cancer, dust-related diseases, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, noise, and injuries are available. However, better implementation of these measures is needed. Regulation, enforcement of regulation, and incentives for employers are effective interventions to achieve this goal. There is evidence that feedback and rewards for workers help in reducing occupational injuries. There is no evidence in many studies that back pain can be prevented. Personal protective equipment technically has the potential to reduce exposure but this is difficult to put into effect. There is no evidence in the studies regarding the effectiveness of education and training, preventive drugs, or health examinations. There is evidence that the implementation of technical measures enforced by regulation can prevent occupational diseases and injuries. For other interventions such as education or health examinations, there is no evidence that supports their effectiveness. More systematic reviews are needed in the area of injury prevention.
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A clinically integrated post-graduate training programme in evidence-based medicine versus no intervention for improving disability evaluations: a cluster randomised clinical trial.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2013
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Although several studies have shown that teaching EBM is effective in improving knowledge, at present, there is no convincing evidence that teaching EBM also changes professional behaviour in practice. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinically integrated post-graduate training programme in EBM on evidence-based disability evaluation.
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Effectiveness of a hospital-based work support intervention for female cancer patients - a multi-centre randomised controlled trial.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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One key aspect of cancer survivorship is return-to-work. Unfortunately, many cancer survivors face problems upon their return-to-work. For that reason, we developed a hospital-based work support intervention aimed at enhancing return-to-work. We studied effectiveness of the intervention compared to usual care for female cancer patients in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial.
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Blunt versus sharp suture needles for preventing percutaneous exposure incidents in surgical staff.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2011
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Surgeons and their assistants are especially at risk of exposure to blood due to glove perforations and needle stick injuries during operations. The use of blunt needles can reduce this risk because they dont penetrate skin easily but still perform sufficiently in other tissues.
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Synthesizing study results in a systematic review.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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A single study rarely suffices to underpin treatment or policy decisions. This creates a strong imperative for systematic reviews. Authors of reviews need a method to synthesize the results of several studies, regardless of whether or which statistical method is used. In this article, we provide arguments for combining studies in a review. To combine studies authors should judge the similarity of studies. This judgement should be based on the working mechanism of the intervention or exposure. It should also be assessed if this mechanism is similar for various populations and follow-up times. The same judgement applies to the control interventions. Similar studies can be combined in either a meta-analysis or narrative synthesis. Other methods such as vote counting, levels of evidence synthesis, or best evidence synthesis are better avoided because they may produce biased results. We support our arguments by re-analysing a systematic review. In its original form, the review showed strong evidence of no effect, but our re-analysis concluded there is evidence of an effect. We provide a flow-chart to guide authors through the synthesis and assessment process.
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Breast cancer survivors views of factors that influence the return-to-work process--a qualitative study.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2011
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Accumulating evidence suggests that most employed breast cancer survivors are able to return to work but often experience difficulties in the process. The objective of this study was to identify: (i) factors experienced as barriers to and facilitators of the return-to-work (RTW) process, (ii) which factors were important during initial and post RTW, and (iii) possible solutions to RTW problems.
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Remediating buildings damaged by dampness and mould for preventing or reducing respiratory tract symptoms, infections and asthma.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2011
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Dampness and mould in buildings have been associated with adverse respiratory symptoms, asthma and respiratory infections of inhabitants. Moisture damage is a very common problem in private houses, workplaces and public buildings such as schools.
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Manual material handling advice and assistive devices for preventing and treating back pain in workers.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2011
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Training and the provision of assistive devices are considered major interventions to prevent back pain and its related disability among workers exposed to manual material handling (MMH).
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Workplace interventions for treatment of occupational asthma.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2011
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The impact of workplace interventions on the outcome of occupational asthma is not well-understood.
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Integrating evidence in disability evaluation by social insurance physicians.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2011
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The aim of this study was to explore applying the method of evidence-based medicine (EBM) to resolve common questions in the field of disability evaluation.
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Interventions to enhance return-to-work for cancer patients.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2011
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Cancer survivors are 1.4 times more likely to be unemployed than healthy people. It is therefore important to provide cancer patients with programmes to support the return-to-work process.
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Effect of job maintenance training program for employees with chronic disease - a randomized controlled trial on self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and fatigue.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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Employees with a chronic physical condition may be hampered in job performance due to physical or cognitive limitations, pain, fatigue, psychosocial barriers, or because medical treatment interferes with work. This study investigates the effect of a group-training program aimed at job maintenance. Essential elements of the program are exploration of work-related problems, communication at the workplace, and the development and implementation of solutions.
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Pre-employment examinations for preventing occupational injury and disease in workers.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2010
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Many employers and other stakeholders believe that health examinations of job applicants prevent occupational diseases and sickness absence.
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Physical conditioning programs for improving work outcomes among workers with back pain.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2010
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The aim of this review was to assess the effect of physical conditioning programs, compared to no or alternative interventions, in reducing time lost from work among patients with back pain.
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A knowledge infrastructure for occupational safety and health.
J. Occup. Environ. Med.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2010
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Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) professionals should use scientific evidence to support their decisions in policy and practice. Although examples from practice show that progress has been made in evidence-based decision making, there is a challenge to improve and extend the facilities that support knowledge translation in practice. A knowledge infrastructure that supports OSH practice should include scientific research, systematic reviews, practice guidelines, and other tools for professionals such as well accessible virtual libraries and databases providing knowledge, quality tools, and good learning materials. A good infrastructure connects facilities with each other and with practice. Training and education is needed for OSH professionals in the use of evidence to improve effectiveness and efficiency. New initiatives show that occupational health can profit from intensified international collaboration to establish a good functioning knowledge infrastructure.
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Functional capacity evaluations for the prevention of occupational re-injuries in injured workers.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2010
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Functional capacity evaluation (FCE) has been widely used to assess workers physical state of readiness to return to work (RTW) after an injury and to make recommendations for the time and capacity in which they might return. FCEs are also used to prevent re-injury after RTW. Despite being a commonly used tool, little is known about how effective FCE is in preventing occupational injuries.
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Transferring results of occupational safety and health cost-effectiveness studies from one country to another - a case study.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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There are a limited number of studies about the cost-effectiveness of occupational health and safety (OSH) interventions. Applying the results of a cost-effectiveness study from one country to another is hampered by differences in the organization of healthcare and social security. In order to find out how these problems can be overcome, we transferred the results of a Dutch occupational cost-effectiveness study to the Finnish situation and vice-versa.
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Irrational Beliefs in Employees with an Adjustment, a Depressive, or an Anxiety Disorder: a Prospective Cohort Study.
J Ration Emot Cogn Behav Ther
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2010
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It remains unclear if patients with different types of common mental disorders, such as adjustment, anxiety and depressive disorders, have the same irrational ideas. The aim of this prospective cohort study (n = 190) is to investigate differences in level and type of irrational beliefs among these groups and to examine whether a change in irrational beliefs is related to symptom recovery. Irrational beliefs (IBI) and symptoms were measured at four points in time: at baseline, after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results showed that diagnostic groups differed in their level of irrational beliefs and this effect remained over time. Highest levels of irrationality were observed in the double diagnosis group, followed by the anxiety disorder group and the depression group. Participants with adjustment disorders showed the lowest levels of irrationality, comparable to a community sample. We did not find differences in the type of irrational beliefs between diagnostic groups. The level of irrationality declined over time for all diagnostic groups. No differences in decrease were observed between diagnostic groups. The magnitude and direction of change in irrational beliefs were related to the magnitude of recovery of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms over time. These results support the application of general cognitive interventions, especially for patients with a depressive or an anxiety disorder.
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Developing guidelines for good practice in the economic evaluation of occupational safety and health interventions.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2010
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One of the objectives of a recently held workshop in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, was to advance methods for the economic evaluation of occupational safety and health (OSH) interventions at the corporate and societal level. Drawing from that workshop, we discuss issues to consider when developing guidelines for good practice (ie, a reference case).
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Enhancing return-to-work in cancer patients, development of an intervention and design of a randomised controlled trial.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2010
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Compared to healthy controls, cancer patients have a higher risk of unemployment, which has negative social and economic impacts on the patients and on society at large. Therefore, return-to-work of cancer patients needs to be improved by way of an intervention. The objective is to describe the development and content of a work-directed intervention to enhance return-to-work in cancer patients and to explain the study design used for evaluating the effectiveness of the intervention. DEVELOPMENT AND CONTENT OF THE INTERVENTION: The work-directed intervention has been developed based on a systematic literature review of work-directed interventions for cancer patients, factors reported by cancer survivors as helping or hindering their return-to-work, focus group and interview data for cancer patients, health care professionals, and supervisors, and vocational rehabilitation literature. The work-directed intervention consists of: 1) 4 meetings with a nurse at the treating hospital department to start early vocational rehabilitation, 2) 1 meeting with the participant, occupational physician, and supervisor to make a return-to-work plan, and 3) letters from the treating physician to the occupational physician to enhance communication. STUDY DESIGN TO EVALUATE THE INTERVENTION: The treating physician or nurse recruits patients before the start of initial treatment. Patients are eligible when they have a primary diagnosis of cancer, will be treated with curative intent, are employed at the time of diagnosis, are on sick leave, and are between 18 and 60 years old. After the patients have given informed consent and have filled out a baseline questionnaire, they are randomised to either the control group or to the intervention group and receive either care as usual or the work-directed intervention, respectively. Primary outcomes are return-to-work and quality of life. The feasibility of the intervention and direct and indirect costs will be determined. Outcomes will be assessed by a questionnaire at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after baseline.
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Exercises for prevention of recurrences of low-back pain.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Back pain is a common disorder that has a tendency to recur. It is unclear if exercises, either as part of treatment or as a post-treatment programme, can reduce back pain recurrences.
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Physical conditioning programs for improving work outcomes in workers with back pain.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Physical conditioning programs aim to improve work status for workers on sick leave. This is an update of a Cochrane Review (Work conditioning, work hardening and functional restoration for workers with back and neck pain) first published in 2003.
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Characteristics of national registries for occupational diseases: international development and validation of an audit tool (ODIT).
BMC Health Serv Res
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2009
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The aim of the study was to develop quality indicators that can be used for quality assessment of registries of occupational diseases in relation to preventive policy on a national level. The research questions were: 1. Which indicators determine the quality of national registries of occupational diseases with respect to their ability to provide appropriate information for preventive policy? 2. What are the criteria that can distinguish low quality from high quality?
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Search strings for the study of putative occupational determinants of disease.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2009
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To identify efficient PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles regarding putative occupational determinants of conditions not generally considered to be work related.
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A systematic review of occupational safety and health business cases.
Scand J Work Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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Business cases are commonly developed as means to rationalize investment. We systematically reviewed 26 reported cases on occupational safety and health (OSH) interventions to assess if health and productivity arguments make a good business case.
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The role of neuropsychological functioning in cancer survivors return to work one year after diagnosis.
Psychooncology
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2009
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The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between neuropsychological functioning and the ability to work in cancer survivors.
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Interventions to prevent occupational noise induced hearing loss.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2009
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Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to noise levels that increase their risk of hearing impairment. Little is known about the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention interventions.
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Alcohol and drug screening of occupational drivers for preventing injury.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2009
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Workforce alcohol and drug testing is commonplace but its effect in reducing occupational injuries remains unclear.
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Cancer survivors and unemployment: a meta-analysis and meta-regression.
JAMA
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2009
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Nearly half of adult cancer survivors are younger than 65 years, but the association of cancer survivorship with employment status is unknown.
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Audit of quality of diagnostic procedures for occupational asthma.
Occup Med (Lond)
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2009
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Previous studies have reported deficiencies in the quality of the diagnosis of occupational asthma. A low quality of diagnostic procedures means that the occupational cause of asthma is less likely to be revealed.
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Interventions to facilitate return to work in adults with adjustment disorders.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
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Adjustment disorders are a frequent cause of sick leave and various interventions have been developed to expedite the return to work (RTW) of individuals on sick leave due to adjustment disorders.
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Interventions to prevent injuries in construction workers.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
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Construction workers are frequently exposed to various types of injury-inducing hazards. A number of injury prevention interventions have been proposed, yet their effectiveness is uncertain.
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Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
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Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to noise levels that increase their risk of hearing impairment. Little is known about the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention interventions.
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When Work is Related to Disease, What Establishes Evidence for a Causal Relation?
Saf Health Work
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Establishing a causal relationship between factors at work and disease is difficult for occupational physicians and researchers. This paper seeks to provide arguments for the judgement of evidence of causality in observational studies that relate work factors to disease. I derived criteria for the judgement of evidence of causality from the following sources: the criteria list of Hill, the approach by Rothman, the methods used by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), and methods used by epidemiologists. The criteria are applied to two cases of putative occupational diseases; breast cancer caused by shift work and aerotoxic syndrome. Only three of the Hill criteria can be applied to an actual study. Rothman stresses the importance of confounding and alternative explanations than the putative cause. IARC closely follows Hill, but they also incorporate other than epidemiological evidence. Applied to shift work and breast cancer, these results have found moderate evidence for a causal relationship, but applied to the aerotoxic syndrome, there is an absence of evidence of causality. There are no ready to use algorithms for judgement of evidence of causality. Criteria from different sources lead to similar results and can make a conclusion of causality more or less likely.
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Proper manual handling techniques to prevent low back pain, a Cochrane systematic review.
Work
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Training and provision of assistive devices are considered major interventions to prevent and treat low back pain (LBP) among workers exposed to manual material handling (MMH). To establish the effectiveness of training and provision of assistive devices in preventing and treating LBP an update of a Cochrane literature review was performed to November 2010. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cohort studies with a concurrent control group (CCTs) were included. Nine RCTs (20.101 employees) and nine CCTs (1280 employees) were included for prevention: six more than in the previous version. No study on treatment was found. None of the included RCTs and CCTs provided evidence that training and provision of assistive devices prevented LBP when compared to no intervention or another intervention.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.