JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor KRP6 Induces Mitosis and Impairs Cytokinesis in Giant Cells Induced by Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Arabidopsis.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In Arabidopsis thaliana, seven cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been identified, designated interactors of CDKs or Kip-related proteins (KRPs). Here, the function of KRP6 was investigated during cell cycle progression in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes. Contrary to expectations, analysis of Meloidogyne incognita-induced galls of KRP6-overexpressing lines revealed a role for this particular KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. In accordance, KRP6-overexpressing suspension cultures displayed accelerated entry into mitosis, but delayed mitotic progression. Likewise, phenotypic analysis of cultured cells and nematode-induced giant cells revealed a failure in mitotic exit, with the appearance of multinucleated cells as a consequence. Strong KRP6 expression upon nematode infection and the phenotypic resemblance between KRP6 overexpression cell cultures and root-knot morphology point toward the involvement of KRP6 in the multinucleate and acytokinetic state of giant cells. Along these lines, the parasite might have evolved to manipulate plant KRP6 transcription to the benefit of gall establishment.
Related JoVE Video
Transcriptome Analysis in Cotton Boll Weevil (Anthonomus grandis) and RNA Interference in Insect Pests.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cotton plants are subjected to the attack of several insect pests. In Brazil, the cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis, is the most important cotton pest. The use of insecticidal proteins and gene silencing by interference RNA (RNAi) as techniques for insect control are promising strategies, which has been applied in the last few years. For this insect, there are not much available molecular information on databases. Using 454-pyrosequencing methodology, the transcriptome of all developmental stages of the insect pest, A. grandis, was analyzed. The A. grandis transcriptome analysis resulted in more than 500.000 reads and a data set of high quality 20,841 contigs. After sequence assembly and annotation, around 10,600 contigs had at least one BLAST hit against NCBI non-redundant protein database and 65.7% was similar to Tribolium castaneum sequences. A comparison of A. grandis, Drosophila melanogaster and Bombyx mori protein families data showed higher similarity to dipteran than to lepidopteran sequences. Several contigs of genes encoding proteins involved in RNAi mechanism were found. PAZ Domains sequences extracted from the transcriptome showed high similarity and conservation for the most important functional and structural motifs when compared to PAZ Domains from 5 species. Two SID-like contigs were phylogenetically analyzed and grouped with T. castaneum SID-like proteins. No RdRP gene was found. A contig matching chitin synthase 1 was mined from the transcriptome. dsRNA microinjection of a chitin synthase gene to A. grandis female adults resulted in normal oviposition of unviable eggs and malformed alive larvae that were unable to develop in artificial diet. This is the first study that characterizes the transcriptome of the coleopteran, A. grandis. A new and representative transcriptome database for this insect pest is now available. All data support the state of the art of RNAi mechanism in insects.
Related JoVE Video
Ectopic expression of a Meloidogyne incognita dorsal gland protein in tobacco accelerates the formation of the nematode feeding site.
Plant Sci.
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Meloidogyne spp., plant-parasitic nematodes present worldwide, are intensively studied because of the damage caused to a large variety of agronomically important crops. Several reports indicate that proteins from the Meloidogyne spp. dorsal gland might play an important role to allow proper establishment of a functional nematode feeding site. The precise role of these proteins in the process of feeding cell development is unknown. To gain insights into the function of these secreted M. incognita proteins, we constitutively (ectopically) expressed the nematodes dorsal gland protein 7E12 in tobacco plants. It was found that the number of galls at 8 and 16 days after nematode infection was significantly higher in transgenic plants compared to control plants. Eggs from nematodes in transgenic plants hatched faster than those in control plants. Histological analysis of nematode induced galls in transgenic plants clearly shows a different morphology. Giant feeding cells harbor more vacuoles and an increased amount of cell wall invaginations, while neighboring cells surrounding feeding cells are more numerous. These results suggest that the presence of the 7E12 protein in tobacco accelerates gall formation. This assumption is supported by our data illustrating faster gall formation and egg eclosion in transgenic plants.
Related JoVE Video
Variant Cry1Ia toxins generated by DNA shuffling are active against sugarcane giant borer.
J. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Sugarcane giant borer (Telchin licus licus) is a serious sugarcane pest in Americas whose endophytic lifestyle hampers effective chemical and biological controls. Therefore, development of alternative control methods is extremely important. Envisaging development of transgenic plants resistant to this pest, we investigated the effect of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry protein Cry1Ia12synth (truncated protein lacking C-terminus with plant codon usage) and variants against T. l. licus. cry1Ia12synth gene was used to generate mutated variants, which were screened for toxicity toward T. l. licus. For that purpose, an innovative technique combining cry gene shuffling with phage-display was used to build a combinatorial library comprising 1.97x10(5) Cry1Ia12synth variants. Screening of this library for variants binding to T. l. licus Brush Border Midgut Vesicles led to the identification of hundreds of clones, out of which 30 were randomly chosen for toxicity testing. Bioassays revealed four variants exhibiting activity against T. l. licus as compared to the non-toxic Cry1Ia12synth. Eight single substitutions sites were found in these active variants. Based on theoretical molecular modelling, the probable implications of these mutations are discussed. Therefore, we have four genes encoding Cry1Ia12synth variants active against T. l. licus promising for future development of resistant transgenic sugarcane lines.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.