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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Low-Dose Aspirin, Smoking Status, and the Risk of Spontaneous Preterm Birth.
Am J Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2014
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Objective?We evaluated the relationship between aspirin supplementation and perinatal outcomes for potential effect modification by smoking status. Study Design?A secondary analysis of two multicenter trials for which prophylactic aspirin supplementation was given to either low- or high-risk women for prevention of preeclampsia (PE). We examined the effect of aspirin by smoking status using the Breslow-Day test. Primary outcomes for this analysis were PE and preterm birth (PTB)?
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Timing of Elective Delivery in Gastroschisis: A Decision and Cost Effectiveness Analysis.
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2014
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To determine the most cost-effective delivery timing in pregnancies complicated by gastroschisis using a decision-analytic model.
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Is low-dose aspirin therapy to prevent preeclampsia more efficacious in non-obese women or when initiated early in pregnancy?
J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2014
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Abstract Objective: Late timing of intervention and maternal obesity are potential explanations for the modest effect of aspirin for preeclampsia prevention. We explored whether low-dose aspirin (LDA) is more effective in women at increased risk when initiated before 16 weeks' gestation or given to non-obese women. Methods: Secondary analysis of a trial to evaluate LDA (60 mg/day) for preeclampsia prevention in high risk women. Participants were randomized to LDA or placebo between 13-26 weeks. We stratified the effect of LDA on preeclampsia by a) timing of randomization (<16 or ?16 weeks gestation) and b) BMI class (non-obese and obese). The Breslow-Day test for homogeneity was used to assess for variations in effect of LDA across gestational age (GA) and BMI groups. Results: Of 2503 women, 461 (18.4%) initiated LDA <16 weeks. LDA effect was not better when initiated <16 weeks (RR 0.93, 95%CI 0.67-1.31) vs. ?16 weeks (RR 0.90, 95%CI 0.75-1.08), (p-value for interaction=0.87). Similarly, LDA effect was not better in non-obese (RR 0.91, 95%CI 0.7-1.13) vs. obese women (RR 0.89, 95%CI 0.7-1.13), (p-value for interaction=0.85). Conclusion: LDA for preeclampsia prevention was not more effective when initiated <16 weeks or used in non-obese women at risk for preeclampsia. No particular subgroup of women was more or less likely to benefit from LDA therapy.
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The Institute of Medicine Guidelines for Gestational Weight Gain after a Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Outcomes.
Am J Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2014
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Objective?The objective of this study was to assess the impact of gestational weight gain outside the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations after the diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) on perinatal outcomes. Materials and Methods?This was a retrospective cohort study. Women were classified as gestational weight gain (GWG) within, less than, or greater than IOM recommendations for body mass index as calculated by gestational weight gain per week after a diagnosis of GDM. Outcomes assessed were preeclampsia, cesarean delivery, A2 GDM, birth weight, small for gestational age (SGA), large for gestational age (LGA), macrosomia, and preterm delivery. Groups were compared using analysis of variance and chi-square test for trend, as appropriate. Backward stepwise logistic regression was used to adjust for significant confounding factors. Results?Of 635 subjects, 92 gained within, 175 gained less than, and 368 gained more than IOM recommendations. The risk of cesarean delivery and A2 GDM was increased in those gaining above the IOM recommendations compared with within. For every 1-lb/week increase in weight gain after diagnosis of GDM, there was a 36 to 83% increase in the risk of preeclampsia, cesarean delivery, A2 GDM, macrosomia, and LGA, without decreases in SGA or preterm delivery. Conclusion?Weight gain more than the IOM recommendations per week of gestation after a diagnosis of GDM is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.
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Cervical pessary use and preterm birth.
Clin Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
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Preterm birth remains a considerable public health concern and priority. Little headway has been made in the prevention of preterm birth despite considerable research in this area. New ideas and treatments are desperately needed. The pessary has emerged as a possible treatment for the prevention of preterm birth in both singleton and twin gestations. It appears to be low cost with minimal side effects. This review focuses on the available evidence for the use of cervical pessaries for the prevention of preterm birth, especially in a high-risk population with a shortened cervical length. Larger scale randomized-controlled trials are warranted before incorporation of the pessary into standard obstetrical practice.
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Risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with mild chronic hypertension before 20 weeks of gestation.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2014
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To evaluate whether blood pressure (BP) less than 140/90 mm Hg is associated with lower risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with mild chronic hypertension.
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Epidural Use and Clinical Chorioamnionitis among Women Who Delivered Vaginally.
Am J Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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Objective?Chorioamnionitis, an important cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity, is influenced by epidural use and the occurrence of epidural fever. We evaluated the association between chorioamnionitis, histologic placental findings, and intrapartum factors focusing on epidural use. Materials and Methods?We conducted a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of different doses of oxytocin to prevent postpartum hemorrhage among women who delivered vaginally. The primary outcome was clinical diagnosis of chorioamnionitis leading to antibiotic therapy. Intrapartum factors examined included epidural use, parity, labor induction, gestational age, maternal age, ethnicity, body mass index, cervical dilatation at admission, preeclampsia/eclampsia, preterm labor, and duration of labor. Results?Of the 1,798 women randomized, we excluded 13 multifetal births leaving 1,785 for analysis: 1,491 had an epidural and 294 did not. Of those with epidural, 8.0% had clinically diagnosed chorioamnionitis compared with only 1.0% without epidural: unadjusted odds ratio (OR)?=?8.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.63-26.40); p?
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Higher-dose oxytocin to prevent obstetric hemorrhage at vaginal delivery-does duration of infusion matter?
Am J Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Objective?Postpartum higher-dose oxytocin (80 U) compared with lower dose (10 U) given in 500 mL over 1 hour does not decrease postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) requiring treatment, but reduces the risk of hematocrit decline???6% among women delivering vaginally. Our objective was to evaluate whether the duration of administration of oxytocin influences outcomes. Study Design?We compared a cohort receiving a postpartum oxytocin infusion of 80 U/500 mL over 1 hour to a concurrent cohort of women receiving 80 U/500 mL over 8 hours. The primary outcome was any treatment of PPH (uterotonics, blood transfusion, tamponade, and surgery). Secondary outcomes included pre- to postdelivery median hematocrit change and hematocrit decline???6%. Results?There were 653 and 676 women identified in the 1- and 8-hour cohorts, respectively. There was no difference in PPH requiring any treatment between the 1- and 8-hour cohorts (6 vs. 6%, p?=?0.70). There were no differences in individual treatment components including blood transfusion (p?=?0.75). Median hematocrit decline (p?=?0.02) was lower in the 8-hour cohort, but there was no difference in frequency of hematocrit decline???6% (p?=?0.15). Results were unchanged by multivariable adjustments. Conclusions?Postpartum higher-dose oxytocin administered over 1 hour compared with 8 hours was not associated with an increased treatment of PPH or frequency of hematocrit decline???6%.
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The utility of ultrasound surveillance of fluid and growth in obese women.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of ultrasound surveillance in obese women.
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Maternal serum serpin B7 is associated with early spontaneous preterm birth.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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We sought to identify serum biomarkers of early spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) using semiquantitative proteomic analyses.
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Impact of Sickle Hemoglobinopathies on Pregnancy-Related Venous Thromboembolism.
Am J Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 12-12-2013
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Objective?The aim of the study is to examine the relationship between sickle cell trait (Hb AS) and other sickle hemoglobinopathies and the risk of thromboembolism during pregnancy or the puerperium. Study Design?Retrospective cohort study of African American women receiving prenatal care from 1991 to 2006. Sickle cell status was ascertained by routine hemoglobin electrophoresis. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) was defined as one or more episodes of deep venous and/or pulmonary thromboembolism during pregnancy or the puerperium according to discharge diagnoses based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Results?Among 22,140 women with hemoglobin (Hb) AA status, 20 women (0.09%) experienced pregnancy-related VTE compared with 3 women (0.15%) of 2,037 women with Hb AS; relative risk (RR) for the association with AS status?=?1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5 to 5.5. Of 103 women, 3 women (2.9%) with sickle cell disease conditions (Hb SS, Hb SC, or Hb S,beta-thalassemia) experienced thromboembolism. Compared with women with Hb AA status, the RR?=?32.2, 95% CI 9.7 to 107. Conclusion?Sickle cell trait may be associated with a modest increase in VTE in the setting of pregnancy; sickle cell disease conditions are strongly associated with this rare but potentially fatal outcome.
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Risk factors for wound disruption following cesarean delivery.
J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.
PUBLISHED: 10-31-2013
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Abstract Objective: Risk factors for post-cesarean wound infection, but not disruption, are well-described in the literature. The primary objective of this study was to identify risk factors for non-infectious post-cesarean wound disruption. Methods: Secondary analysis was conducted using data from a single-center randomized controlled trial of staple versus suture skin closure in women ?24 weeks gestation undergoing cesarean delivery. Wound disruption was defined as subcutaneous skin or fascial dehiscence excluding primary wound infections. Composite wound morbidity (disruption or infection) was examined as a secondary outcome. Patient demographics, medical co-morbidities, and intrapartum characteristics were evaluated as potential risk factors using multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of the 398 randomized patients, 340, including 26 with disruptions (7.6%) met inclusion criteria and were analyzed. After multivariable adjustments, African-American race (aOR 3.9, 95% CI 1.1-13.8) and staple - as opposed to suture - wound closure (aOR 5.4, 95% CI 1.8-16.1) remained significant risk factors for disruption; non-significant increases were observed for body mass index ?30 (aOR 2.1, 95% CI 0.6-7.5), but not for diabetes mellitus (aOR 0.9, 95% CI 0.3-2.9). Results for composite wound morbidity were similar. Conclusions: Skin closure with staples, African-American race, and considering the relatively small sample size, potentially obesity are associated with increased risk of non-infectious post-cesarean wound disruption.
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Inflammatory and Tissue Remodeling Urinary Biomarkers before and after Mid Urethral Sling Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence.
J. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2013
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Urinary biomarkers were measured in women at baseline and 1 year after surgery for stress urinary incontinence, and associations with clinicodemographic covariates and outcomes were analyzed.
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Is Midtrimester Vitamin D Status Associated with Spontaneous Preterm Birth and Preeclampsia?
Am J Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
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Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate whether midtrimester maternal vitamin D is associated with preeclampsia < 37 weeks or spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) < 35 weeks.Study Design Nested case-control comprising two case subsets: (1) 100 women with preeclampsia < 37 weeks and (2) 100 women with SPB < 35 weeks. Controls consisted of 200 women delivered between 39 and 40 weeks. Stored maternal serum obtained between 15 and 21 weeks was tested for total 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH D) levels using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Mean 25-OH D levels and prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency (25-OH D < 30 ng/mL) and deficiency (25-OH D < 15 ng/mL) were compared.Results In this study, 89 preeclampsia, 90 SPTB cases, and 177 controls had valid measurements. Mean midtrimester vitamin D was not significantly different between women with preeclampsia (27.4 ng/mL ± 14.4) and controls (28.6 ± 12.6) (p = 0.46), or SPTB (28.8 ± 13.2) and controls (p = 0.92). After adjusting for potential cofounders, neither vitamin D insufficiency (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6-2.0) nor deficiency (adjusted OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7-3.0) was significantly associated with preeclampsia. Likewise, SPTB was not significantly associated with either vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency (adjusted OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4-1.4, adjusted OR, 1.3 or 95% CI, 0.6-3.0, respectively).Conclusion Midtrimester maternal vitamin D was not significantly associated with preeclampsia < 37 weeks or SPTB < 35 weeks.
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Decreasing prematurity in twin gestations: predicaments and possibilities.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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The twin birth rate has been steadily increasing in the United States over the past 10 years attributable in large part to the increased use of reproductive technologies. Despite advancements in the prevention of preterm labor for singletons, the overall rate of preterm birth has decreased only minimally. Several interventions to prevent preterm birth in twins have been studied, but none has proven effective. Inpatient bedrest has not been shown to be effective and can cause significant maternal morbidity. Although intramuscular 17?-hydroxyprogesterone caproate is effective in decreasing the risk of recurrent preterm delivery in singletons, neither it nor cerclage is effective in twin gestations, even in those with a short cervix. However, small trials, subgroup analyses, and a meta-analysis suggest that vaginal progesterone and the Arabin cervical pessary may reduce rates of preterm birth in twins of mothers with a short cervix. Given the current lack of effective therapies to prevent preterm birth in twins, large multicenter trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of vaginal progesterone and pessary in twins of mothers with a short cervix.
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The association of maternal obesity with fetal pH and base deficit at cesarean delivery.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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To evaluate the association between maternal body mass index (BMI) and umbilical cord acid-base status at the time of cesarean delivery.
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Surgical staples compared with subcuticular suture for skin closure after cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2013
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To compare the risk of cesarean wound disruption or infection after closure with surgical staples compared with subcuticular suture.
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Selective uptake of influenza vaccine and pregnancy outcomes.
J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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To describe the characteristics of pregnant women who accept the influenza vaccine and evaluate the relationship between vaccination and adverse pregnancy outcomes.
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Effect of corticosteroid interval on markers of inflammation in spontaneous preterm birth.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2013
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The objective of the study was to evaluate whether the time interval from corticosteroid administration to delivery is associated with variations in inflammatory/infectious markers in women with spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB).
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Risk factors for uterine atony/postpartum hemorrhage requiring treatment after vaginal delivery.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2013
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We sought to identify risk factors for uterine atony or hemorrhage.
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Early severe hypoalbuminemia is an independent risk factor for intestinal failure in gastroschisis.
Pediatr. Surg. Int.
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2011
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This study attempted to evaluate the association of early hypoalbuminemia with the risk of intestinal failure in gastroschisis patients.
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Use of ethnic-specific medians for Hispanic patients reduces ethnic disparities in multiple marker screening.
Prenat. Diagn.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2011
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To estimate whether midtrimester maternal serum analyte concentrations differ between Caucasian and Hispanic women and whether using ethnic-specific medians affects quad screen performance.
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Effects of multidisciplinary prenatal care and delivery mode on gastroschisis outcomes.
J. Pediatr. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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This study examined the effects of multidisciplinary prenatal care and delivery mode on gastroschisis outcomes, with adjustment for key confounding variables.
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Cervical conization and the risk of preterm delivery.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2011
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The current body of literature concerning cervical conization and its effect on subsequent pregnancy outcome is conflicting. Depending on the type of conization procedure that is examined and the quality of the control group, the results and conclusions vary widely. Because treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is commonplace among women of reproductive age, it is imperative that practitioners have an understanding of the issues surrounding the treatment. Therefore, this review will summarize the published literature that addresses excisional procedures of the uterine cervix and the risk of preterm delivery in subsequent pregnancies and provide reasonable treatment recommendations for women with cervical abnormalities and a desire for future fertility.
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Fetal anomalies in obese women: the contribution of diabetes.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2010
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To examine temporal changes in maternal weight and the association with major structural anomalies and other factors, such as diabetes, in our primary obstetric population.
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Ten putative contributors to the obesity epidemic.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr
PUBLISHED: 12-05-2009
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The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic.
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Medication effects on midtrimester maternal serum screening.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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To determine whether medication classes are associated with alterations in concentrations of Quad screen analytes or the screen-positive rate.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.