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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Characterization of the ATG8-conjugation system in 2 Plasmodium species with special focus on the liver stage: Possible linkage between the apicoplastic and autophagic systems?
Autophagy
PUBLISHED: 12-12-2013
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Plasmodium parasites successfully colonize different habitats within mammals and mosquitoes, and adaptation to various environments is accompanied by changes in their organelle composition and size. Previously, we observed that during hepatocyte infection, Plasmodium discards organelles involved in invasion and expands those implicated in biosynthetic pathways. We hypothesized that this process is regulated by autophagy. Plasmodium spp. possess a rudimentary set of known autophagy-related proteins that includes the ortholog of yeast Atg8. In this study, we analyzed the activity of the ATG8-conjugation pathway over the course of the lifecycle of Plasmodium falciparum and during the liver stage of Plasmodium berghei. We engineered a transgenic P. falciparum strain expressing mCherry-PfATG8. These transgenic parasites expressed mCherry-PfATG8 in human hepatocytes and erythrocytes, and in the midgut and salivary glands of Anopheles mosquitoes. In all observed stages, mCherry-PfATG8 was localized to tubular structures. Our EM and colocalization studies done in P. berghei showed the association of PbATG8 on the limiting membranes of the endosymbiont-derived plastid-like organelle known as the apicoplast. Interestingly, during parasite replication in hepatocytes, the association of PbATG8 with the apicoplast increases as this organelle expands in size. PbATG3, PbATG7 and PbATG8 are cotranscribed in all parasitic stages. Molecular analysis of PbATG8 and PbATG3 revealed a novel mechanism of interaction compared with that observed for other orthologs. This is further supported by the inability of Plasmodium ATG8 to functionally complement atg8? yeast or localize to autophagosomes in starved mammalian cells. Altogether, these data suggests a unique role for the ATG8-conjugation system in Plasmodium parasites.
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A Randomized Controlled Trial of Balance Training During Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Individuals With COPD.
Chest
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2013
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Deficits in balance are increasingly recognized among the important secondary impairments in COPD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a balance-training program on measures of balance and physical function in patients with COPD enrolled in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR).
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Cardiorespiratory Responses During the 6-Minute Walk and Ramp Cycle Ergometer Tests and Their Relationship to Physical Activity in Stroke.
Neurorehabil Neural Repair
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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and objectives. The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is used to measure exercise capacity after stroke. We sought to compare cardiorespiratory responses during the 6MWT with responses to a ramp cycle ergometer test (CET) in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. A secondary objective was to determine the relationship between cardiorespiratory responses during each test and daily physical activity.
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Toxoplasma gondii salvages sphingolipids from the host Golgi through the rerouting of selected Rab vesicles to the parasitophorous vacuole.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2013
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The obligate intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii actively invades mammalian cells and, upon entry, forms its own membrane-bound compartment, named the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Within the PV, the parasite replicates and scavenges nutrients, including lipids, from host organelles. Although T. gondii can synthesize sphingolipids de novo, it also scavenges these lipids from the host Golgi. How the parasite obtains sphingolipids from the Golgi remains unclear, as the PV avoids fusion with host organelles. In this study, we explore the host Golgi-PV interaction and evaluate the importance of host-derived sphingolipids for parasite growth. We demonstrate that the PV preferentially localizes near the host Golgi early during infection and remains closely associated with this organelle throughout infection. The parasite subverts the structure of the host Golgi, resulting in its fragmentation into numerous ministacks, which surround the PV, and hijacks host Golgi-derived vesicles within the PV. These vesicles, marked with Rab14, Rab30, or Rab43, colocalize with host-derived sphingolipids in the vacuolar space. Scavenged sphingolipids contribute to parasite replication since alterations in host sphingolipid metabolism are detrimental for the parasites growth. Thus our results reveal that T. gondii relies on host-derived sphingolipids for its development and scavenges these lipids via Golgi-derived vesicles.
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Host Organelle Hijackers: a similar modus operandi for Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia trachomatis: co-infection model as a tool to investigate pathogenesis.
Pathog Dis
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2013
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The bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are the causative agents of chlamydiosis and toxoplasmosis in humans, respectively. Both microorganisms are obligate intracellular pathogens and notorious for extensively modifying the cytoskeletal architecture and the endomembrane system of their host cells to establish productive infections. This review highlights the similar tactics developed by these two pathogens to manipulate their host cell despite their genetic unrelatedness. Using an in vitro cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are infected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii simultaneously, thus setting up an intracellular competition, we demonstrate that the solutions to the problem of intracellular survival deployed by the parasite and the bacterium may represent an example of convergent evolution, driven by the necessity to acquire nutrients in a hostile environment.
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A novel approach to long-term respiratory care: results of a community-based post-rehabilitation maintenance program in COPD.
Respir Med
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Although the short-term benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) are well established, improvements in exercise tolerance and health status diminish over time. The objectives of this study were to determine the feasibility and within-subject effects of a 1-year community-based maintenance exercise program for patients with COPD following completion of hospital-based PR.
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Dynamics of the major histocompatibility complex class I processing and presentation pathway in the course of malaria parasite development in human hepatocytes: implications for vaccine development.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Control of parasite replication exerted by MHC class I restricted CD8+ T-cells in the liver is critical for vaccination-induced protection against malaria. While many intracellular pathogens subvert the MHC class I presentation machinery, its functionality in the course of malaria replication in hepatocytes has not been characterized. Using experimental systems based on specific identification, isolation and analysis of human hepatocytes infected with P. berghei ANKA GFP or P. falciparum 3D7 GFP sporozoites we demonstrated that molecular components of the MHC class I pathway exhibit largely unaltered expression in malaria-infected hepatocytes until very late stages of parasite development. Furthermore, infected cells showed no obvious defects in their capacity to upregulate expression of different molecular components of the MHC class I machinery in response to pro-inflammatory lymphokines or trigger direct activation of allo-specific or peptide-specific human CD8+ T-cells. We further demonstrate that ectopic expression of circumsporozoite protein does not alter expression of critical genes of the MHC class I pathway and its response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, we identified supra-cellular structures, which arose at late stages of parasite replication, possessed the characteristic morphology of merosomes and exhibited nearly complete loss of surface MHC class I expression. These data have multiple implications for our understanding of natural T-cell immunity against malaria and may promote development of novel, efficient anti-malaria vaccines overcoming immune escape of the parasite in the liver.
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Impairments in systems underlying control of balance in COPD.
Chest
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2011
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Although balance deficits are increasingly recognized in COPD, little is known regarding the disordered subcomponents underlying the control of balance. We aimed to determine the specific components of balance that are impaired in COPD and to investigate the association among balance, peripheral muscle strength, and physical activity.
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Deficiency of a Niemann-Pick, type C1-related protein in toxoplasma is associated with multiple lipidoses and increased pathogenicity.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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Several proteins that play key roles in cholesterol synthesis, regulation, trafficking and signaling are united by sharing the phylogenetically conserved sterol-sensing domain (SSD). The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma possesses at least one gene coding for a protein containing the canonical SSD. We investigated the role of this protein to provide information on lipid regulatory mechanisms in the parasite. The protein sequence predicts an uncharacterized Niemann-Pick, type C1-related protein (NPC1) with significant identity to human NPC1, and it contains many residues implicated in human NPC disease. We named this NPC1-related protein, TgNCR1. Mammalian NPC1 localizes to endo-lysosomes and promotes the movement of sterols and sphingolipids across the membranes of these organelles. Miscoding patient mutations in NPC1 cause overloading of these lipids in endo-lysosomes. TgNCR1, however, lacks endosomal targeting signals, and localizes to flattened vesicles beneath the plasma membrane of Toxoplasma. When expressed in mammalian NPC1 mutant cells and properly addressed to endo-lysosomes, TgNCR1 restores cholesterol and GM1 clearance from these organelles. To clarify the role of TgNCR1 in the parasite, we genetically disrupted NCR1; mutant parasites were viable. Quantitative lipidomic analyses on the ?NCR1 strain reveal normal cholesterol levels but an overaccumulation of several species of cholesteryl esters, sphingomyelins and ceramides. ?NCR1 parasites are also characterized by abundant storage lipid bodies and long membranous tubules derived from their parasitophorous vacuoles. Interestingly, these mutants can generate multiple daughters per single mother cell at high frequencies, allowing fast replication in vitro, and they are slightly more virulent in mice than the parental strain. These data suggest that the ?NCR1 strain has lost the ability to control the intracellular levels of several lipids, which subsequently results in the stimulation of lipid storage, membrane biosynthesis and parasite division. Based on these observations, we ascribe a role for TgNCR1 in lipid homeostasis in Toxoplasma.
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Introduction of caveolae structural proteins into the protozoan Toxoplasma results in the formation of heterologous caveolae but not caveolar endocytosis.
PLoS ONE
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Present on the plasma membrane of most metazoans, caveolae are specialized microdomains implicated in several endocytic and trafficking mechanisms. Caveolins and the more recently discovered cavins are the major protein components of caveolae. Previous studies reported that caveolar invaginations can be induced de novo on the surface of caveolae-negative mammalian cells upon heterologous expression of caveolin-1. However, it remains undocumented whether other components in the transfected cells participate in caveolae formation. To address this issue, we have exploited the protozoan Toxoplasma as a heterologous expression system to provide insights into the minimal requirements for caveogenesis and caveolar endocytosis. Upon expression of caveolin-1, Toxoplasma accumulates prototypical exocytic caveolae precursors in the cytoplasm. Toxoplasma expressing caveolin-1 alone, or in conjunction with cavin-1, neither develops surface-located caveolae nor internalizes caveolar ligands. These data suggest that the formation of functional caveolae at the plasma membrane in Toxoplasma and, by inference in all non-mammalian cells, requires effectors other than caveolin-1 and cavin-1. Interestingly, Toxoplasma co-expressing caveolin-1 and cavin-1 displays an impressive spiraled network of membranes containing the two proteins, in the cytoplasm. This suggests a synergistic activity of caveolin-1 and cavin-1 in the morphogenesis and remodeling of membranes, as illustrated for Toxoplasma.
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Fierce competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for host cell structures in dually infected cells.
Eukaryotic Cell
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The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogens benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients.
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A novel co-infection model with Toxoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis highlights the importance of host cell manipulation for nutrient scavenging.
Cell. Microbiol.
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Toxoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis are obligate intracellular pathogens that have evolved analogous strategies to replicate within mammalian cells. Both pathogens are known to extensively remodel the cytoskeleton, and to recruit endocytic and exocytic organelles to their respective vacuoles. However, how important these activities are for infectivity by either pathogen remains elusive. Here, we have developed a novel co-infection system to gain insights into the developmental cycles of Toxoplasma and C.?trachomatis by infecting human cells with both pathogens, and examining their respective ability to replicate and scavenge nutrients. We hypothesize that the common strategies used by Toxoplasma and Chlamydia to achieve development results in direct competition of the two pathogens for the same pool of nutrients. We show that a single human cell can harbour Chlamydia and Toxoplasma. In co-infected cells, Toxoplasma is able to divert the content of host organelles, such as cholesterol. Consequently, the infectious cycle of Toxoplasma progresses unimpeded. In contrast, Chlamydias ability to scavenge selected nutrients is diminished, and the bacterium shifts to a stress-induced persistent growth. Parasite killing engenders an ordered return to normal chlamydial development. We demonstrate that C.?trachomatisenters a stress-induced persistence phenotype as a direct result from being barred from its normal nutrient supplies as addition of excess nutrients, e.g. amino acids, leads to substantial recovery of Chlamydia growth and infectivity. Co-infection of C.?trachomatis with slow growing strains of Toxoplasma or a mutant impaired in nutrient acquisition does not restrict chlamydial development. Conversely, Toxoplasma growth is halted in cells infected with the highly virulent Chlamydia psittaci. This study illustrates the key role that cellular remodelling plays in the exploitation of host intracellular resources by Toxoplasma and Chlamydia. It further highlights the delicate balance between success and failure of infection by intracellular pathogens in a co-infection system at the cellular level.
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AtMYB61, an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, functions as a pleiotropic regulator via a small gene network.
New Phytol.
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Throughout their lifetimes, plants must coordinate the regulation of various facets of growth and development. Previous evidence has suggested that the Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB, AtMYB61, might function as a coordinate regulator of multiple aspects of plant resource allocation. Using a combination of cell biology, transcriptome analysis and biochemistry, in conjunction with gain-of-function and loss-of-function genetics, the role of AtMYB61 in conditioning resource allocation throughout the plant life cycle was explored. In keeping with its role as a regulator of resource allocation, AtMYB61 is expressed in sink tissues, notably xylem, roots and developing seeds. Loss of AtMYB61 function decreases xylem formation, induces qualitative changes in xylem cell structure and decreases lateral root formation; in contrast, gain of AtMYB61 function has the opposite effect on these traits. AtMYB61 coordinates a small network of downstream target genes, which contain a motif in their upstream regulatory regions that is bound by AtMYB61, and AtMYB61 activates transcription from this same motif. Loss-of-function analysis supports the hypothesis that AtMYB61 targets play roles in shaping subsets of AtMYB61-related phenotypes. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtMYB61 links the transcriptional control of multiple aspects of plant resource allocation.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.