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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Rapid adoption of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG for acute gastroenteritis.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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A 2007 meta-analysis showed probiotics, specifically Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), shorten diarrhea from acute gastroenteritis (AGE) by 24 hours and decrease risk of progression beyond 7 days. In 2005, our institution published a guideline recommending consideration of probiotics for patients with AGE, but only 1% of inpatients with AGE were prescribed LGG. The objective of this study was to increase inpatient prescribing of LGG at admission to >90%, for children hospitalized with AGE, within 120 days.
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Should breastfeeding mothers avoid allergenic foods?
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2010
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Questions about maternal diet in lactation are common in clinical nursing practice, for nurses often work with breastfeeding women who are concerned about allergies, or who associate infant symptoms of crying or irritability to something they themselves have eaten. Can exposure to food proteins in a womans diet actually cause food allergy in her breastfed child? Are special diets effective in managing infant allergic symptoms or gastrointestinal distress? The purpose of this article is to review the evidence related to diet for new breastfeeding mothers and make recommendations to guide clinical practice; seven such practice recommendations were developed after a thorough literature review. Nurses can use this literature summary to provide care based upon the best available research evidence.
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The development of evidence-based care recommendations to improve the safe use of anticoagulants in children.
J Pediatr Pharmacol Ther
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Evidence-based care recommendations and standardized protocols improve outcomes. In addition, anticoagulant management has been recognized by The Joint Commission (TJC) as an opportunity for improving patient safety. A National Patient Safety Goal requiring a standardized process for patients receiving anticoagulants was established by TJC. This requirement provided an opportunity to apply evidence-based care recommendations to the issue of safe anticoagulant use. To meet TJC requirement, the following searchable clinical question was drafted: "In children receiving anticoagulation therapy, what are the appropriate dosing, laboratory monitoring, timing, and dosing adjustments for warfarin, unfractionated heparin, and low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent coagulation-related complications?" The team used the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation Collaboration (AGREE) instrument to evaluate the quality and relevance of identified guidelines in answering the clinical question. Best Evidence Statements (BESts) were developed for each of the medications (warfarin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and unfractionated heparin). BESts provide the format for the presentation of recommendations, discussion, and methods for point-of-care providers seeking synthesized evidence to guide care decisions. The primary goal of developing and implementing these statements was to standardize the use of anticoagulants and to prevent unsafe practices. A secondary goal was to ensure accessibility of the BESts throughout our organization, including the electronic medical record, various internal division home pages, and our organizations external website. The anticoagulant BESts developed at our organization show how an interprofessional approach to patient care results in the development of evidence-based care recommendations. The BESts were developed to standardize care associated with the use of anticoagulants and to provide dosing and monitoring parameters to ensure safe care to all patients receiving these medications. The development of evidence-based care recommendations can be accomplished with a focused interprofessional team dedicated to providing the safest possible care to patients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.