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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Molecular pathogenesis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia revealed by exome sequencing, developmental data, and bioinformatics.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2014
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Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and severe birth defect. Despite its clinical significance, the genetic and developmental pathways underlying this disorder are incompletely understood. In this study, we report a catalog of variants detected by a whole exome sequencing study on 275 individuals with CDH. Predicted pathogenic variants in genes previously identified in either humans or mice with diaphragm defects are enriched in our CDH cohort compared with 120 size-matched random gene sets. This enrichment was absent in control populations. Variants in these critical genes can be found in up to 30.9% of individuals with CDH. In addition, we filtered variants by using genes derived from regions of recurrent copy number variations in CDH, expression profiles of the developing diaphragm, protein interaction networks expanded from the known CDH-causing genes, and prioritized genes with ultrarare and highly disruptive variants, in 11.3% of CDH patients. These strategies have identified several high priority genes and developmental pathways that likely contribute to the CDH phenotype. These data are valuable for comparison of candidate genes generated from whole exome sequencing of other CDH cohorts or multiplex kindreds and provide ideal candidates for further functional studies. Furthermore, we propose that these genes and pathways will enhance our understanding of the heterogeneous molecular etiology of CDH.
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Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization.
Dan E Arking, Sara L Pulit, Lia Crotti, Pim van der Harst, Patricia B Munroe, Tamara T Koopmann, Nona Sotoodehnia, Elizabeth J Rossin, Michael Morley, Xinchen Wang, Andrew D Johnson, Alicia Lundby, Daniel F Gudbjartsson, Peter A Noseworthy, Mark Eijgelsheim, Yuki Bradford, Kirill V Tarasov, Marcus Dörr, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Annukka M Lahtinen, Ilja M Nolte, Albert Vernon Smith, Joshua C Bis, Aaron Isaacs, Stephen J Newhouse, Daniel S Evans, Wendy S Post, Daryl Waggott, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Andrew A Hicks, Lewin Eisele, David Ellinghaus, Caroline Hayward, Pau Navarro, Sheila Ulivi, Toshiko Tanaka, David J Tester, Stéphanie Chatel, Stefan Gustafsson, Meena Kumari, Richard W Morris, Asa T Naluai, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Alexander Kluttig, Bernhard Strohmer, Andrie G Panayiotou, Maria Torres, Michael Knoflach, Jaroslav A Hubacek, Kamil Slowikowski, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Runjun D Kumar, Tamara B Harris, Lenore J Launer, Alan R Shuldiner, Alvaro Alonso, Joel S Bader, Georg Ehret, Hailiang Huang, W H Linda Kao, James B Strait, Peter W Macfarlane, Morris Brown, Mark J Caulfield, Nilesh J Samani, Florian Kronenberg, Johann Willeit, , J Gustav Smith, Karin H Greiser, Henriette Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Karl Werdan, Massimo Carella, Leopoldo Zelante, Susan R Heckbert, Bruce M Psaty, Jerome I Rotter, Ivana Kolčić, Ozren Polašek, Alan F Wright, Maura Griffin, Mark J Daly, David O Arnar, Hilma Holm, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Joshua C Denny, Dan M Roden, Rebecca L Zuvich, Valur Emilsson, Andrew S Plump, Martin G Larson, Christopher J O'Donnell, Xiaoyan Yin, Marco Bobbo, Adamo P d'Adamo, AnnaMaria Iorio, Gianfranco Sinagra, Angel Carracedo, Steven R Cummings, Michael A Nalls, Antti Jula, Kimmo K Kontula, Annukka Marjamaa, Lasse Oikarinen, Markus Perola, Kimmo Porthan, Raimund Erbel, Per Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Hagen Kälsch, Markus M Nöthen, Marcel den Hoed, Ruth J F Loos, Dag S Thelle, Christian Gieger, Thomas Meitinger, Siegfried Perz, Annette Peters, Hanna Prucha, Moritz F Sinner, Melanie Waldenberger, Rudolf A de Boer, Lude Franke, Pieter A van der Vleuten, Britt Maria Beckmann, Eimo Martens, Abdennasser Bardai, Nynke Hofman, Arthur A M Wilde, Elijah R Behr, Chrysoula Dalageorgou, John R Giudicessi, Argelia Medeiros-Domingo, Julien Barc, Florence Kyndt, Vincent Probst, Alice Ghidoni, Roberto Insolia, Robert M Hamilton, Stephen W Scherer, Jeffrey Brandimarto, Kenneth Margulies, Christine E Moravec, Fabiola Del Greco M, Christian Fuchsberger, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Wai K Lee, Graham C M Watt, Harry Campbell, Sarah H Wild, Nour E El Mokhtari, Norbert Frey, Folkert W Asselbergs, Irene Mateo Leach, Gerjan Navis, Maarten P van den Berg, Dirk J van Veldhuisen, Manolis Kellis, Bouwe P Krijthe, Oscar H Franco, Albert Hofman, Jan A Kors, André G Uitterlinden, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Lyudmyla Kedenko, Claudia Lamina, Ben A Oostra, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Edward G Lakatta, Antonella Mulas, Marco Orrù, David Schlessinger, Manuela Uda, Marcello R P Markus, Uwe Völker, Harold Snieder, Timothy D Spector, Johan Arnlöv, Lars Lind, Johan Sundström, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Mika Kivimäki, Mika Kähönen, Nina Mononen, Olli T Raitakari, Jorma S Viikari, Vera Adamkova, Stefan Kiechl, María Brión, Andrew N Nicolaides, Bernhard Paulweber, Johannes Haerting, Anna F Dominiczak, Fredrik Nyberg, Peter H Whincup, Aroon D Hingorani, Jean-Jacques Schott, Connie R Bezzina, Erik Ingelsson, Luigi Ferrucci, Paolo Gasparini, James F Wilson, Igor Rudan, Andre Franke, Thomas W Mühleisen, Peter P Pramstaller, Terho J Lehtimäki, Andrew D Paterson, Afshin Parsa, Yongmei Liu, Cornelia M van Duijn, David S Siscovick, Vilmundur Gudnason, Yalda Jamshidi, Veikko Salomaa, Stephan B Felix, Serena Sanna, Marylyn D Ritchie, Bruno H Stricker, Kari Stefansson, Laurie A Boyer, Thomas P Cappola, Jesper V Olsen, Kasper Lage, Peter J Schwartz, Stefan Kääb, Aravinda Chakravarti, Michael J Ackerman, Arne Pfeufer, Paul I W de Bakker, Christopher Newton-Cheh.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain ?8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD.
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Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics.
Nat. Methods
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS). We integrated the LQTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT-interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LQTS protein network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics.
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Protein-protein interactions and genetic diseases: The interactome.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2014
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Protein-protein interactions mediate essentially all biological processes. Despite the quality of these data being widely questioned a decade ago, the reproducibility of large-scale protein interaction data is now much improved and there is little question that the latest screens are of high quality. Moreover, common data standards and coordinated curation practices between the databases that collect the interactions have made these valuable data available to a wide group of researchers. Here, I will review how protein-protein interactions are measured, collected and quality controlled. I discuss how the architecture of molecular protein networks has informed disease biology, and how these data are now being computationally integrated with the newest genomic technologies, in particular genome-wide association studies and exome-sequencing projects, to improve our understanding of molecular processes perturbed by genetics in human diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.
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An international effort towards developing standards for best practices in analysis, interpretation and reporting of clinical genome sequencing results in the CLARITY Challenge.
Catherine A Brownstein, Alan H Beggs, Nils Homer, Barry Merriman, Timothy W Yu, Katherine C Flannery, Elizabeth T DeChene, Meghan C Towne, Sarah K Savage, Emily N Price, Ingrid A Holm, Lovelace J Luquette, Elaine Lyon, Joseph Majzoub, Peter Neupert, David McCallie, Peter Szolovits, Huntington F Willard, Nancy J Mendelsohn, Renee Temme, Richard S Finkel, Sabrina W Yum, Livija Medne, Shamil R Sunyaev, Ivan Adzhubey, Christopher A Cassa, Paul I W de Bakker, Hatice Duzkale, Piotr Dworzynski, William Fairbrother, Laurent Francioli, Birgit H Funke, Monica A Giovanni, Robert E Handsaker, Kasper Lage, Matthew S Lebo, Monkol Lek, Ignaty Leshchiner, Daniel G MacArthur, Heather M McLaughlin, Michael F Murray, Tune H Pers, Paz P Polak, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Heidi L Rehm, Rachel Soemedi, Nathan O Stitziel, Sara Vestecka, Jochen Supper, Claudia Gugenmus, Bernward Klocke, Alexander Hahn, Max Schubach, Mortiz Menzel, Saskia Biskup, Peter Freisinger, Mario Deng, Martin Braun, Sven Perner, Richard J H Smith, Janeen L Andorf, Jian Huang, Kelli Ryckman, Val C Sheffield, Edwin M Stone, Thomas Bair, E Ann Black-Ziegelbein, Terry A Braun, Benjamin Darbro, Adam P DeLuca, Diana L Kolbe, Todd E Scheetz, Aiden E Shearer, Rama Sompallae, Kai Wang, Alexander G Bassuk, Erik Edens, Katherine Mathews, Steven A Moore, Oleg A Shchelochkov, Pamela Trapane, Aaron Bossler, Colleen A Campbell, Jonathan W Heusel, Anne Kwitek, Tara Maga, Karin Panzer, Thomas Wassink, Douglas Van Daele, Hela Azaiez, Kevin Booth, Nic Meyer, Michael M Segal, Marc S Williams, Gerard Tromp, Peter White, Donald Corsmeier, Sara Fitzgerald-Butt, Gail Herman, Devon Lamb-Thrush, Kim L McBride, David Newsom, Christopher R Pierson, Alexander T Rakowsky, Ales Maver, Luca Lovrecic, Anja Palandačić, Borut Peterlin, Ali Torkamani, Anna Wedell, Mikael Huss, Andrey Alexeyenko, Jessica M Lindvall, Måns Magnusson, Daniel Nilsson, Henrik Stranneheim, Fulya Taylan, Christian Gilissen, Alexander Hoischen, Bregje Van Bon, Helger Yntema, Marcel Nelen, Weidong Zhang, Jason Sager, Lu Zhang, Kathryn Blair, Deniz Kural, Michael Cariaso, Greg G Lennon, Asif Javed, Saloni Agrawal, Pauline C Ng, Komal S Sandhu, Shuba Krishna, Vamsi Veeramachaneni, Ofer Isakov, Eran Halperin, Eitan Friedman, Noam Shomron, Gustavo Glusman, Jared C Roach, Juan Caballero, Hannah C Cox, Denise Mauldin, Seth A Ament, Lee Rowen, Daniel R Richards, F Anthony San Lucas, Manuel L Gonzalez-Garay, C Thomas Caskey, Yu Bai, Ying Huang, Fang Fang, Yan Zhang, Zhengyuan Wang, Jorge Barrera, Juan M García-Lobo, Domingo González-Lamuño, Javier Llorca, María C Rodriguez, Ignacio Varela, Martin G Reese, Francisco M De La Vega, Edward Kiruluta, Michele Cargill, Reece K Hart, Jon M Sorenson, Gholson J Lyon, David A Stevenson, Bruce E Bray, Barry M Moore, Karen Eilbeck, Mark Yandell, Hongyu Zhao, Lin Hou, Xiaowei Chen, Xiting Yan, Mengjie Chen, Cong Li, Can Yang, Murat Günel, Peining Li, Yong Kong, Austin C Alexander, Zayed I Albertyn, Kym M Boycott, Dennis E Bulman, Paul M K Gordon, A Micheil Innes, Bartha M Knoppers, Jacek Majewski, Christian R Marshall, Jillian S Parboosingh, Sarah L Sawyer, Mark E Samuels, Jeremy Schwartzentruber, Isaac S Kohane, David M Margulies.
Genome Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2014
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There is tremendous potential for genome sequencing to improve clinical diagnosis and care once it becomes routinely accessible, but this will require formalizing research methods into clinical best practices in the areas of sequence data generation, analysis, interpretation and reporting. The CLARITY Challenge was designed to spur convergence in methods for diagnosing genetic disease starting from clinical case history and genome sequencing data. DNA samples were obtained from three families with heritable genetic disorders and genomic sequence data were donated by sequencing platform vendors. The challenge was to analyze and interpret these data with the goals of identifying disease-causing variants and reporting the findings in a clinically useful format. Participating contestant groups were solicited broadly, and an independent panel of judges evaluated their performance.
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Integrative annotation of variants from 1092 humans: application to cancer genomics.
Science
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2013
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Interpreting variants, especially noncoding ones, in the increasing number of personal genomes is challenging. We used patterns of polymorphisms in functionally annotated regions in 1092 humans to identify deleterious variants; then we experimentally validated candidates. We analyzed both coding and noncoding regions, with the former corroborating the latter. We found regions particularly sensitive to mutations ("ultrasensitive") and variants that are disruptive because of mechanistic effects on transcription-factor binding (that is, "motif-breakers"). We also found variants in regions with higher network centrality tend to be deleterious. Insertions and deletions followed a similar pattern to single-nucleotide variants, with some notable exceptions (e.g., certain deletions and enhancers). On the basis of these patterns, we developed a computational tool (FunSeq), whose application to ~90 cancer genomes reveals nearly a hundred candidate noncoding drivers.
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Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects human islets against cytokine-mediated ?-cell dysfunction and death: a proteomic study of the pathways involved.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2013
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Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been shown to protect pancreatic ?-cells against cytokine-induced dysfunction and destruction. The mechanisms through which GLP-1 exerts its effects are complex and still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the protein expression profiles of human islets of Langerhans treated with cytokines (IL-1? and IFN-?) in the presence or absence of GLP-1 by 2D difference gel electrophoresis and subsequent protein interaction network analysis to understand the molecular pathways involved in GLP-1-mediated ?-cell protection. Co-incubation of cytokine-treated human islets with GLP-1 resulted in a marked protection of ?-cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis and significantly attenuated cytokine-mediated inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The cytoprotective effects of GLP-1 coincided with substantial alterations in the protein expression profile of cytokine-treated human islets, illustrating a counteracting effect on proteins from different functional classes such as actin cytoskeleton, chaperones, metabolic proteins, and islet regenerating proteins. In summary, GLP-1 alters in an integrated manner protein networks in cytokine-exposed human islets while protecting them against cytokine-mediated cell death and dysfunction. These data illustrate the beneficial effects of GLP-1 on human islets under immune attack, leading to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved, a prerequisite for improving therapies for diabetic patients.
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Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine.
Verneri Anttila, Bendik S Winsvold, Padhraig Gormley, Tobias Kurth, Francesco Bettella, George McMahon, Mikko Kallela, Rainer Malik, Boukje de Vries, Gisela Terwindt, Sarah E Medland, Unda Todt, Wendy L McArdle, Lydia Quaye, Markku Koiranen, M Arfan Ikram, Terho Lehtimäki, Anine H Stam, Lannie Ligthart, Juho Wedenoja, Ian Dunham, Benjamin M Neale, Priit Palta, Eija Hämäläinen, Markus Schürks, Lynda M Rose, Julie E Buring, Paul M Ridker, Stacy Steinberg, Hreinn Stefansson, Finnbogi Jakobsson, Debbie A Lawlor, David M Evans, Susan M Ring, Markus Färkkilä, Ville Artto, Mari A Kaunisto, Tobias Freilinger, Jean Schoenen, Rune R Frants, Nadine Pelzer, Claudia M Weller, Ronald Zielman, Andrew C Heath, Pamela A F Madden, Grant W Montgomery, Nicholas G Martin, Guntram Borck, Hartmut Göbel, Axel Heinze, Katja Heinze-Kuhn, Frances M K Williams, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Anneli Pouta, Joyce van den Ende, André G Uitterlinden, Albert Hofman, Najaf Amin, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Jacqueline M Vink, Kauko Heikkilä, Michael Alexander, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Stefan Schreiber, Thomas Meitinger, Heinz Erich Wichmann, Arpo Aromaa, Johan G Eriksson, Bryan J Traynor, Daniah Trabzuni, Elizabeth Rossin, Kasper Lage, Suzanne B R Jacobs, J Raphael Gibbs, Ewan Birney, Jaakko Kaprio, Brenda W Penninx, Dorret I Boomsma, Cornelia van Duijn, Olli Raitakari, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, John-Anker Zwart, Lynn Cherkas, David P Strachan, Christian Kubisch, Michel D Ferrari, Arn M J M van den Maagdenberg, Martin Dichgans, Maija Wessman, George Davey Smith, Kari Stefansson, Mark J Daly, Dale R Nyholt, Daniel I Chasman, Aarno Palotie, .
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2013
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Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 95,425 population-matched controls. We identified 12 loci associated with migraine susceptibility (P<5×10(-8)). Five loci are new: near AJAP1 at 1p36, near TSPAN2 at 1p13, within FHL5 at 6q16, within C7orf10 at 7p14 and near MMP16 at 8q21. Three of these loci were identified in disease subgroup analyses. Brain tissue expression quantitative trait locus analysis suggests potential functional candidate genes at four loci: APOA1BP, TBC1D7, FUT9, STAT6 and ATP5B.
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MetaRanker 2.0: a web server for prioritization of genetic variation data.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2013
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MetaRanker 2.0 is a web server for prioritization of common and rare frequency genetic variation data. Based on heterogeneous data sets including genetic association data, protein-protein interactions, large-scale text-mining data, copy number variation data and gene expression experiments, MetaRanker 2.0 prioritizes the protein-coding part of the human genome to shortlist candidate genes for targeted follow-up studies. MetaRanker 2.0 is made freely available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaRanker-2.0.
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Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 are identified in individuals with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ~12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1 signaling and can be mutated in CHH. We therefore hypothesized that mutations in genes encoding a broader range of modulators of the FGFR1 pathway might contribute to the genetics of CHH as causal or modifier mutations. Thus, we aimed to (1) investigate whether CHH individuals harbor mutations in members of the so-called "FGF8 synexpression" group and (2) validate the ability of a bioinformatics algorithm on the basis of protein-protein interactome data (interactome-based affiliation scoring [IBAS]) to identify high-quality candidate genes. On the basis of sequence homology, expression, and structural and functional data, seven genes were selected and sequenced in 386 unrelated CHH individuals and 155 controls. Except for FGF18 and SPRY2, all other genes were found to be mutated in CHH individuals: FGF17 (n = 3 individuals), IL17RD (n = 8), DUSP6 (n = 5), SPRY4 (n = 14), and FLRT3 (n = 3). Independently, IBAS predicted FGF17 and IL17RD as the two top candidates in the entire proteome on the basis of a statistical test of their protein-protein interaction patterns to proteins known to be altered in CHH. Most of the FGF17 and IL17RD mutations altered protein function in vitro. IL17RD mutations were found only in KS individuals and were strongly linked to hearing loss (6/8 individuals). Mutations in genes encoding components of the FGF pathway are associated with complex modes of CHH inheritance and act primarily as contributors to an oligogenic genetic architecture underlying CHH.
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Differential protein pathways in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin d(3) and dexamethasone modulated tolerogenic human dendritic cells.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2011
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Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) that are maturation-resistant and locked in a semimature state are promising tools in clinical applications for tolerance induction. Different immunomodulatory agents have been shown to induce a tolerogenic DC phenotype, such as the biologically active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)), glucocorticoids, and a synergistic combination of both. In this study, we aimed to characterize the protein profile, function and phenotype of DCs obtained in vitro in the presence of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), dexamethasone (DEX), and a combination of both compounds (combi). Human CD14(+) monocytes were differentiated toward mature DCs, in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and/or DEX. Cells were prefractionated into cytoplasmic and microsomal fractions and protein samples were separated in two different pH ranges (pH 3-7NL and 6-9), analyzed by 2D-DIGE and differentially expressed spots (p < 0.05) were identified after MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. In parallel, morphological and phenotypical analyses were performed, revealing that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)- and combi-mDCs are closer related to each other than DEX-mDCs. This was translated in their protein profile, indicating that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is more potent than DEX in inducing a tolerogenic profile on human DCs. Moreover, we demonstrate that combining 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) with DEX induces a unique protein expression pattern with major imprinting of the 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) effect. Finally, protein interaction networks and pathway analysis suggest that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), rather than DEX treatment, has a severe impact on metabolic pathways involving lipids, glucose, and oxidative phosphorylation, which may affect the production of or the response to ROS generation. These findings provide new insights on the molecular basis of DC tolerogenicity induced by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and/or DEX, which may lead to the discovery of new pathways involved in DC immunomodulation.
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Huntingtin-interacting protein 14 is a type 1 diabetes candidate protein regulating insulin secretion and beta-cell apoptosis.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2011
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Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease characterized by the loss of insulin-secreting ?-cells. Although the disease has a strong genetic component, and several loci are known to increase T1D susceptibility risk, only few causal genes have currently been identified. To identify disease-causing genes in T1D, we performed an in silico "phenome-interactome analysis" on a genome-wide linkage scan dataset. This method prioritizes candidates according to their physical interactions at the protein level with other proteins involved in diabetes. A total of 11 genes were predicted to be likely disease genes in T1D, including the INS gene. An unexpected top-scoring candidate gene was huntingtin-interacting protein (HIP)-14/ZDHHC17. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic sections demonstrated that HIP14 is almost exclusively expressed in insulin-positive cells in islets of Langerhans. RNAi knockdown experiments established that HIP14 is an antiapoptotic protein required for ?-cell survival and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1? and IFN-?) that mediate ?-cell dysfunction in T1D down-regulated HIP14 expression in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells and in isolated rat and human islets. Overexpression of HIP14 was associated with a decrease in IL-1?-induced NF-?B activity and protection against IL-1?-mediated apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that the current network biology approach is a valid method to identify genes of importance for T1D and may therefore embody the basis for more rational and targeted therapeutic approaches.
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Meta-analysis of heterogeneous data sources for genome-scale identification of risk genes in complex phenotypes.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Meta-analyses of large-scale association studies typically proceed solely within one data type and do not exploit the potential complementarities in other sources of molecular evidence. Here, we present an approach to combine heterogeneous data from genome-wide association (GWA) studies, protein-protein interaction screens, disease similarity, linkage studies, and gene expression experiments into a multi-layered evidence network which is used to prioritize the entire protein-coding part of the genome identifying a shortlist of candidate genes. We report specifically results on bipolar disorder, a genetically complex disease where GWA studies have only been moderately successful. We validate one such candidate experimentally, YWHAH, by genotyping five variations in 640 patients and 1,377 controls. We found a significant allelic association for the rs1049583 polymorphism in YWHAH (adjusted P = 5.6e-3) with an odds ratio of 1.28 [1.12-1.48], which replicates a previous case-control study. In addition, we demonstrate our approachs general applicability by use of type 2 diabetes data sets. The method presented augments moderately powered GWA data, and represents a validated, flexible, and publicly available framework for identifying risk genes in highly polygenic diseases. The method is made available as a web service at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/metaranker.
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Pervasive sharing of genetic effects in autoimmune disease.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohns disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and type 1 diabetes. We have developed a novel statistic for Cross Phenotype Meta-Analysis (CPMA) which detects association of a SNP to multiple, but not necessarily all, phenotypes. With it, we find evidence that 47/107 (44%) immune-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P(CPMA)<0.01). We also show that distinct groups of interacting proteins are encoded near SNPs which predispose to the same subsets of diseases; we propose these as the mechanistic basis of shared disease risk. We are thus able to leverage genetic data across diseases to construct biological hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of pathogenesis.
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Proteins encoded in genomic regions associated with immune-mediated disease physically interact and suggest underlying biology.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2011
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these risk variants. It has previously been observed that different genes harboring causal mutations for the same Mendelian disease often physically interact. We sought to evaluate the degree to which this is true of genes within strongly associated loci in complex disease. Using sets of loci defined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohns disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more densely connected than chance expectation. To confirm biological relevance, we show that the components of the networks tend to be expressed in similar tissues relevant to the phenotypes in question, suggesting the network indicates common underlying processes perturbed by risk loci. Furthermore, we show that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non-immune traits to assess its applicability to complex traits in general. We find that genes in loci associated to height and lipid levels assemble into significantly connected networks but did not detect excess connectivity among Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) loci beyond chance. Taken together, our results constitute evidence that, for many of the complex diseases studied here, common genetic associations implicate regions encoding proteins that physically interact in a preferential manner, in line with observations in Mendelian disease.
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Ubiquitin accumulation in autophagy-deficient mice is dependent on the Nrf2-mediated stress response pathway: a potential role for protein aggregation in autophagic substrate selection.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2010
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Genetic ablation of autophagy in mice leads to liver and brain degeneration accompanied by the appearance of ubiquitin (Ub) inclusions, which has been considered to support the hypothesis that ubiquitination serves as a cis-acting signal for selective autophagy. We show that tissue-specific disruption of the essential autophagy genes Atg5 and Atg7 leads to the accumulation of all detectable Ub-Ub topologies, arguing against the hypothesis that any particular Ub linkage serves as a specific autophagy signal. The increase in Ub conjugates in Atg7(-/-) liver and brain is completely suppressed by simultaneous knockout of either p62 or Nrf2. We exploit a novel assay for selective autophagy in cell culture, which shows that inactivation of Atg5 leads to the selective accumulation of aggregation-prone proteins, and this does not correlate with an increase in substrate ubiquitination. We propose that protein oligomerization drives autophagic substrate selection and that the accumulation of poly-Ub chains in autophagy-deficient circumstances is an indirect consequence of activation of Nrf2-dependent stress response pathways.
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Novel insights into the global proteome responses of insulin-producing INS-1E cells to different degrees of endoplasmic reticulum stress.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2010
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Exposure of insulin-secreting ?-cells to inflammatory cytokines or high concentrations of free fatty acids, factors involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, ?-cell dysfunction, and eventually apoptotic ?-cell death. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of ER stress on ?-cells at the protein level to evaluate the contribution of post-transcriptional and post-translational changes in ER stress-induced ?-cell damage. INS-1E cells were exposed in vitro to the ER-stress inducer cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) at two concentrations, and protein changes were evaluated using 2D-DIGE. CPA, 25 ?M, led to massive apoptosis, accompanied by a near complete protein translation shut-down. CPA, 6.25 ?M, led to adaptation of the ?-cells to ER stress. Identification of the differentially expressed proteins in the two conditions led to the discovery of a clear pattern of defense pathways, with post-translational modifications playing a crucial role. Key alterations included inhibition of insulin translation and post-translational modifications in ER chaperones HYOU1 and HSPA5. Also, a central role for 14-3-3 proteins is suggested. In conclusion, INS-1E cells are highly sensitive to ER stress, leading to important post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications that may contribute to ?-cell dysfunction and death.
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Dissecting spatio-temporal protein networks driving human heart development and related disorders.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2010
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Aberrant organ development is associated with a wide spectrum of disorders, from schizophrenia to congenital heart disease, but systems-level insight into the underlying processes is very limited. Using heart morphogenesis as general model for dissecting the functional architecture of organ development, we combined detailed phenotype information from deleterious mutations in 255 genes with high-confidence experimental interactome data, and coupled the results to thorough experimental validation. Hereby, we made the first systematic analysis of spatio-temporal protein networks driving many stages of a developing organ identifying several novel signaling modules. Our results show that organ development relies on surprisingly few, extensively recycled, protein modules that integrate into complex higher-order networks. This design allows the formation of a complicated organ using simple building blocks, and suggests how mutations in the same genes can lead to diverse phenotypes. We observe a striking temporal correlation between organ complexity and the number of discrete functional modules coordinating morphogenesis. Our analysis elucidates the organization and composition of spatio-temporal protein networks that drive the formation of organs, which in the future may lay the foundation of novel approaches in treatments, diagnostics, and regenerative medicine.
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Proteome analysis demonstrates profound alterations in human dendritic cell nature by TX527, an analogue of vitamin D.
Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2009
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Structural analogues of vitamin D have been put forward as therapeutic agents able to exploit the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D, without its undesired calcemic side effects. We have demonstrated that TX527 affects dendritic cell (DC) maturation in vitro, resulting in the generation of a tolerogenic cell. In the present study, we aimed to explore the global protein changes induced by the analogue in immature DC (iDC) and mature human DC and to correlate them with alterations in DC morphology and function. Human CD14(+) monocytes were differentiated toward iDC or mature DCs, in the presence or absence of TX527 (10(-8) M) (n=4). Protein samples were separated into two different pH ranges (pH4-7 and 6-9), analyzed by 2-D DIGE and differentially expressed spots (p<0.01) were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF (76.3 and 70.7% in iDC and mature DCs, respectively). Differential protein expression revealed three protein groups predominantly affected by TX527 treatment, namely proteins involved in cytoskeleton structure, in protein biosynthesis/proteolysis and in metabolism. Moreover, protein interactome-network analysis demonstrated close interaction between these different groups (p<0.001) and morphological and functional analyses confirmed the integrated effect of TX527 on human DCs, resulting in a cell with altered morphology, cell surface marker expression, endocytic and migratory capacity.
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Expression profiling of human genetic and protein interaction networks in type 1 diabetes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
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Proteins contributing to a complex disease are often members of the same functional pathways. Elucidation of such pathways may provide increased knowledge about functional mechanisms underlying disease. By combining genetic interactions in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) with protein interaction data we have previously identified sets of genes, likely to represent distinct cellular pathways involved in T1D risk. Here we evaluate the candidate genes involved in these putative interaction networks not only at the single gene level, but also in the context of the networks of which they form an integral part. mRNA expression levels for each gene were evaluated and profiling was performed by measuring and comparing constitutive expression in human islets versus cytokine-stimulated expression levels, and for lymphocytes by comparing expression levels among controls and T1D individuals. We identified differential regulation of several genes. In one of the networks four out of nine genes showed significant down regulation in human pancreatic islets after cytokine exposure supporting our prediction that the interaction network as a whole is a risk factor. In addition, we measured the enrichment of T1D associated SNPs in each of the four interaction networks to evaluate evidence of significant association at network level. This method provided additional support, in an independent data set, that two of the interaction networks could be involved in T1D and highlights the following processes as risk factors: oxidative stress, regulation of transcription and apoptosis. To understand biological systems, integration of genetic and functional information is necessary, and the current study has used this approach to improve understanding of T1D and the underlying biological mechanisms.
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Expression analyses of human cleft palate tissue suggest a role for osteopontin and immune related factors in palatal development.
Exp. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2009
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Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) is a common congenital malformation with a complex etiology which is not fully elucidated yet. Epidemiological studies point to different etiologies in the cleft lip and palate subgroups, isolated cleft lip (CL), isolated cleft palate (CP) and combined cleft lip and palate (CLP). In order to understand the biological basis in these cleft lip and palate subgroups better we studied the expression profiles in human tissue from patients with CL/P. In each of the CL/P subgroups, samples were obtained from three patients and gene expression analysis was performed. Moreover, selected differentially expressed genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, and by immunohistochemical staining of craniofacial tissue from human embryos. Osteopontin (SPP1) and other immune related genes were significantly higher expressed in palate tissue from patients with CLP compared to CP and immunostaining in palatal shelves against SPP1, chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and serglycin (PRG1) in human embryonic craniofacial tissue were positive, supporting a role for these genes in palatal development. However, gene expression profiles are subject to variations during growth and therefore we recommend that future gene expression in CL/P studies should use tissue from the correct embryonic time and place if possible, to overcome the biases in the presented study.
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Congenital diaphragmatic hernia interval on chromosome 8p23.1 characterized by genetics and protein interaction networks.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
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Chromosome 8p23.1 is a common hotspot associated with major congenital malformations, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiac defects. We present findings from high-resolution arrays in patients who carry a loss (n?=?18) or a gain (n?=?1) of sub-band 8p23.1. We confirm a region involved in both diaphragmatic and heart malformations. Results from a novel CNVConnect algorithm, prioritizing protein-protein interactions between products of genes in the 8p23.1 hotspot and products of previously known CDH causing genes, implicated GATA4, NEIL2, and SOX7 in diaphragmatic defects. Sequence analysis of these genes in 226 chromosomally normal CDH patients, as well as in a small number of deletion 8p23.1 patients, showed rare unreported variants in the coding region; these may be contributing to the diaphragmatic phenotype. We also demonstrated that two of these three genes were expressed in the E11.5-12.5 primordial mouse diaphragm, the developmental stage at which CDH is thought to occur. This combination of bioinformatics and expression studies can be applied to other chromosomal hotspots, as well as private microdeletions or microduplications, to identify causative genes and their interaction networks.
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Genetic and environmental risk factors in congenital heart disease functionally converge in protein networks driving heart development.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Congenital heart disease (CHD) occurs in ?1% of newborns. CHD arises from many distinct etiologies, ranging from genetic or genomic variation to exposure to teratogens, which elicit diverse cell and molecular responses during cardiac development. To systematically explore the relationships between CHD risk factors and responses, we compiled and integrated comprehensive datasets from studies of CHD in humans and model organisms. We examined two alternative models of potential functional relationships between genes in these datasets: direct convergence, in which CHD risk factors significantly and directly impact the same genes and molecules and functional convergence, in which risk factors significantly impact different molecules that participate in a discrete heart development network. We observed no evidence for direct convergence. In contrast, we show that CHD risk factors functionally converge in protein networks driving the development of specific anatomical structures (e.g., outflow tract, ventricular septum, and atrial septum) that are malformed by CHD. This integrative analysis of CHD risk factors and responses suggests a complex pattern of functional interactions between genomic variation and environmental exposures that modulate critical biological systems during heart development.
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Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns.
Cell Rep
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Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle contraction. Furthermore, we illustrate that acetylation of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase serves as a cellular mechanism to switch off enzymatic activity.
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Quantitative maps of protein phosphorylation sites across 14 different rat organs and tissues.
Nat Commun
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Deregulated cellular signalling is a common hallmark of disease, and delineating tissue phosphoproteomes is key to unravelling the underlying mechanisms. Here we present the broadest tissue catalogue of phosphoproteins to date, covering 31,480 phosphorylation sites on 7,280 proteins quantified across 14 rat organs and tissues. We provide the data set as an easily accessible resource via a web-based database, the CPR PTM Resource. A major fraction of the presented phosphorylation sites are tissue-specific and modulate protein interaction networks that are essential for the function of individual organs. For skeletal muscle, we find that phosphotyrosines are over-represented, which is mainly due to proteins involved in glycogenolysis and muscle contraction, a finding we validate in human skeletal muscle biopsies. Tyrosine phosphorylation is involved in both skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction, whereas glycogenolytic enzymes are tyrosine phosphorylated in skeletal muscle but not in the liver. The presented phosphoproteomic method is simple and rapid, making it applicable for screening of diseased tissue samples.
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Sequencing chromosomal abnormalities reveals neurodevelopmental loci that confer risk across diagnostic boundaries.
Cell
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Balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs) represent a relatively untapped reservoir of single-gene disruptions in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). We sequenced BCAs in patients with autism or related NDDs, revealing disruption of 33 loci in four general categories: (1) genes previously associated with abnormal neurodevelopment (e.g., AUTS2, FOXP1, and CDKL5), (2) single-gene contributors to microdeletion syndromes (MBD5, SATB2, EHMT1, and SNURF-SNRPN), (3) novel risk loci (e.g., CHD8, KIRREL3, and ZNF507), and (4) genes associated with later-onset psychiatric disorders (e.g., TCF4, ZNF804A, PDE10A, GRIN2B, and ANK3). We also discovered among neurodevelopmental cases a profoundly increased burden of copy-number variants from these 33 loci and a significant enrichment of polygenic risk alleles from genome-wide association studies of autism and schizophrenia. Our findings suggest a polygenic risk model of autism and reveal that some neurodevelopmental genes are sensitive to perturbation by multiple mutational mechanisms, leading to variable phenotypic outcomes that manifest at different life stages.
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Congenital diaphragmatic hernia candidate genes derived from embryonic transcriptomes.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common (1 in 3,000 live births) major congenital malformation that results in significant morbidity and mortality. The discovery of CDH loci using standard genetic approaches has been hindered by its genetic heterogeneity. We hypothesized that gene expression profiling of developing embryonic diaphragms would help identify genes likely to be associated with diaphragm defects. We generated a time series of whole-transcriptome expression profiles from laser captured embryonic mouse diaphragms at embryonic day (E)11.5 and E12.5 when experimental perturbations lead to CDH phenotypes, and E16.5 when the diaphragm is fully formed. Gene sets defining biologically relevant pathways and temporal expression trends were identified by using a series of bioinformatic algorithms. These developmental sets were then compared with a manually curated list of genes previously shown to cause diaphragm defects in humans and in mouse models. Our integrative filtering strategy identified 27 candidates for CDH. We examined the diaphragms of knockout mice for one of the candidate genes, pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx1), and identified a range of previously undetected diaphragmatic defects. Our study demonstrates the utility of genetic characterization of normal development as an integral part of a disease gene identification and prioritization strategy for CDH, an approach that can be extended to other diseases and developmental anomalies.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.