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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cis and trans regulatory mechanisms control AP2-mediated B cell receptor endocytosis via select tyrosine-based motifs.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Following antigen recognition, B cell receptor (BCR)-mediated endocytosis is the first step of antigen processing and presentation to CD4+ T cells, a crucial component of the initiation and control of the humoral immune response. Despite this, the molecular mechanism of BCR internalization is poorly understood. Recently, studies of activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL) have shown that mutations within the BCR subunit CD79b leads to increased BCR surface expression, suggesting that CD79b may control BCR internalization. Adaptor protein 2 (AP2) is the major mediator of receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. The BCR contains five putative AP2-binding YxxØ motifs, including four that are present within two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). Using a combination of in vitro and in situ approaches, we establish that the sole mediator of AP2-dependent BCR internalization is the membrane proximal ITAM YxxØ motif in CD79b, which is a major target of mutation in ABC DLBCL. In addition, we establish that BCR internalization can be regulated at a minimum of two different levels: regulation of YxxØ AP2 binding in cis by downstream ITAM-embedded DCSM and QTAT regulatory elements and regulation in trans by the partner cytoplasmic domain of the CD79 heterodimer. Beyond establishing the basic rules governing BCR internalization, these results illustrate an underappreciated role for ITAM residues in controlling clathrin-dependent endocytosis and highlight the complex mechanisms that control the activity of AP2 binding motifs in this receptor system.
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The Ia.2 epitope defines a subset of lipid raft-resident MHC class II molecules crucial to effective antigen presentation.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2011
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Previous work established that binding of the 11-5.2 anti-I-A(k) mAb, which recognizes the Ia.2 epitope on I-A(k) class II molecules, elicits MHC class II signaling, whereas binding of two other anti-I-A(k) mAbs that recognize the Ia.17 epitope fail to elicit signaling. Using a biochemical approach, we establish that the Ia.2 epitope recognized by the widely used 11-5.2 mAb defines a subset of cell surface I-A(k) molecules predominantly found within membrane lipid rafts. Functional studies demonstrate that the Ia.2-bearing subset of I-A(k) class II molecules is critically necessary for effective B cell-T cell interactions, especially at low Ag doses, a finding consistent with published studies on the role of raft-resident class II molecules in CD4 T cell activation. Interestingly, B cells expressing recombinant I-A(k) class II molecules possessing a ?-chain-tethered hen egg lysosome peptide lack the Ia.2 epitope and fail to partition into lipid rafts. Moreover, cells expressing Ia.2(-) tethered peptide-class II molecules are severely impaired in their ability to present both tethered peptide or peptide derived from exogenous Ag to CD4 T cells. These results establish the Ia.2 epitope as defining a lipid raft-resident MHC class II conformer vital to the initiation of MHC class II-restricted B cell-T cell interactions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.