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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effect of local application of an antibody against brain-derived neurotrophic factor on neuroma formation after transection of the inferior alveolar nerve in the rat.
Neuroreport
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2014
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This study aimed to examine the contributions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at the injury site toward neuroma formation and nerve regeneration after inferior alveolar nerve transection. Histological analysis confirmed neuroma formation at 2 weeks after complete transection of the inferior alveolar nerve. A local administration of an antibody to BDNF inhibited connective tissue proliferation at the injury site and promoted nerve fiber integrity. Fluorogold labeling showed a significantly higher number of labeled cells in the trigeminal ganglion in the anti-BDNF-treated group compared with the vehicle control group. In-situ hybridization histochemistry showed intense signals for tropomyosin receptor kinase B mRNA in the area of the injury site containing fibrous or granular tissue in the anti-BDNF-treated group. In contrast, these signals were close to the detection limit in the area of the perineurium in intact nerve trunks, indicating that the signals were expressed by fibroblasts within the connective tissue. These findings suggest that antagonization of endogenous BDNF induced by nerve injury reduces neuroma formation, without inhibiting damaged axon regeneration.
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Protracted delay in taste sensation recovery after surgical lingual nerve repair: a case report.
J Med Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Lingual nerve injury is sometimes caused by dental treatment. Many kinds of treatment have been reported, but many have exhibited poor recovery. Here the authors report changes in somatosensory and chemosensory impairments during a long-term observation after lingual nerve repair.
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Morphologic evaluation of the inferior alveolar nerve in patients with sensory disorders by high-resolution 3D volume rendering magnetic resonance neurography on a 3.0-T system.
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2011
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The objective of this study was to evaluate the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) morphologically in patients with symptomatic posttraumatic sensory disorders using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a high-field system.
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Genetic reduction of GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit expression potentiates the immobilizing action of isoflurane.
Neurosci. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2010
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Potentiation of inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid subtype A (GABA(A)) receptor function is involved in the mechanisms of anesthetic action. The present study examined the immobilizing action of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in mice with double knockout (DKO) of phospholipase C-related inactive protein (PRIP)-1 and -2. Both of these proteins play important roles in the expression of GABA(A) receptors containing the gamma2 subunit on the neuronal cell surface. Immunohistochemistry for GABA(A) receptor subunits demonstrated reduced expression of gamma2 subunits in the spinal cord of the DKO mice. Immunohistochemistry also revealed up-regulation of the alpha1 and beta3 subunits even though there were no apparent differences in the immunoreactivities for the beta2 subunits between wild-type and DKO mice. The tail-clamp method was used to evaluate the anesthetic/immobilizing effect of isoflurane and the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was significantly lower in DKO mice compared with wild-type controls (1.07+/-0.01% versus 1.36+/-0.04% atm), indicating an increased sensitivity to isoflurane in DKO mice. These immunohistochemical and pharmacological findings suggest that reduced expression of the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit affects the composition and function of spinal GABA(A) receptors and potentiates the immobilizing action of isoflurane.
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Placement of mandibular nerve block using computed tomography to locate the foramen ovale in a patient with severe dislocation after segmental mandiblectomy.
Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2009
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Operations to the face and skull can obscure the landmarks that are required to locate the position of the foramen ovale. We describe the use of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) to guide the approach to the foramen ovale to block the mandibular nerve in a patient with a mandibular deformity that had been caused by segmental mandiblectomy. Successful blockage of the mandibular nerve controlled the pain, contributed to the relief of physical and mental stress, and avoided the side effects of analgesics and pain from inserting the blocking needle.
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Behavioural and histological observations of sensory impairment caused by tight ligation of the trigeminal nerve in mice.
J. Neurosci. Methods
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2009
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Dental treatments sometimes cause sensory impairment, especially in the region innervated by the third division of the trigeminal nerve. The most frequent symptoms are loss of sensation and abnormal sensation. Although most studies have addressed the neuropathic symptom "allodynia" using experimental animal models of the infraorbital nerve, there is little information regarding the sensory impairment that frequently occurs clinically. Therefore, different experimental models are required to clarify the mechanisms of the clinical effects, and previous experimental models have been limited to rats. Here, we report a sensory impairment model in mice whose mechanical touch threshold increased after tight ligation of the mental nerve. Habituation before surgery by mechanical touching of the face enabled us to observe the long-term chronological changes in sensation. The mechanical touch thresholds within the mental nerve region were measured for 70 postoperative (PO) days. Changes in the distribution of substance P (SP) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry to clarify the involvement of axonal flow in the sensory impairment and its recovery. The mechanical touch thresholds transiently increased by PO days 2-3, but decreased to the preoperative levels at around PO day 14. Apparent SP immunoreactivity was recognizable on the medial side to the ligation at PO days 2-3 and disappeared at PO day 7. These behavioural and immunohistochemical changes appeared to exhibit similar time courses, suggesting a possible relationship between them. Therefore, we suggest that our experimental mouse model could represent a new model for clarifying the mechanism of the sensory impairment caused by peripheral nerve injury.
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Expression of TRPV1 channels after nerve injury provides an essential delivery tool for neuropathic pain attenuation.
PLoS ONE
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Increased expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels, following nerve injury, may facilitate the entry of QX-314 into nociceptive neurons in order to achieve effective and selective pain relief. In this study we hypothesized that the level of QX-314/capsaicin (QX-CAP)--induced blockade of nocifensive behavior could be used as an indirect in-vivo measurement of functional expression of TRPV1 channels. We used the QX-CAP combination to monitor the functional expression of TRPV1 in regenerated neurons after inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transection in rats. We evaluated the effect of this combination on pain threshold at different time points after IAN transection by analyzing the escape thresholds to mechanical stimulation of lateral mental skin. At 2 weeks after IAN transection, there was no QX-CAP mediated block of mechanical hyperalgesia, implying that there was no functional expression of TRPV1 channels. These results were confirmed immunohistochemically by staining of regenerated trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. This suggests that TRPV1 channel expression is an essential necessity for the QX-CAP mediated blockade. Furthermore, we show that 3 and 4 weeks after IAN transection, application of QX-CAP produced a gradual increase in escape threshold, which paralleled the increased levels of TRPV1 channels that were detected in regenerated TG neurons. Immunohistochemical analysis also revealed that non-myelinated neurons regenerated slowly compared to myelinated neurons following IAN transection. We also show that TRPV1 expression shifted towards myelinated neurons. Our findings suggest that nerve injury modulates the TRPV1 expression pattern in regenerated neurons and that the effectiveness of QX-CAP induced blockade depends on the availability of functional TRPV1 receptors in regenerated neurons. The results of this study also suggest that the QX-CAP based approach can be used as a new behavioral tool to detect dynamic changes in TRPV1 expression, in various pathological conditions.
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Orofacial pain related to traumatic neuroma in a patient with multiple TMJ operations.
Cranio
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The diagnosis of orofacial pain associated with temporomandibular disorders after repeated temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgeries can be quite difficult. This case report describes a 52-year-old woman who had previously undergone five TMJ surgeries and developed divergent pain caused by a trigger point in the left preauricular area. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could not be used to identify a lesion because of metallic artifacts from a TMJ prosthesis. However, sonography indicated the location of the suspected lesion. Moreover, a neurological examination performed with local anesthesia was clinically effective in ruling out other diagnoses of orofacial pain. Ultimately, a histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen from the painful site confirmed the lesion to be a traumatic neuroma. This case report suggests the value of including traumatic neuroma in the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of previous TMJ surgery who present with orofacial pain in the region of the TMJ.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.