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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Resveratrol prevents high fat/sucrose diet-induced central arterial wall inflammation and stiffening in nonhuman primates.
Cell Metab.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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Central arterial wall stiffening, driven by a chronic inflammatory milieu, accompanies arterial diseases, the leading cause of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality in Western society. An increase in central arterial wall stiffening, measured as an increase in aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), is a major risk factor for clinical CV disease events. However, no specific therapies to reduce PWV are presently available. In rhesus monkeys, a 2 year diet high in fat and sucrose (HFS) increases not only body weight and cholesterol, but also induces prominent central arterial wall stiffening and increases PWV and inflammation. The observed loss of endothelial cell integrity, lipid and macrophage infiltration, and calcification of the arterial wall were driven by genomic and proteomic signatures of oxidative stress and inflammation. Resveratrol prevented the HFS-induced arterial wall inflammation and the accompanying increase in PWV. Dietary resveratrol may hold promise as a therapy to ameliorate increases in PWV.
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Resveratrol and cancer: focus on in vivo evidence.
Endocr. Relat. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol that provides a number of anti-aging health benefits including improved metabolism, cardioprotection, and cancer prevention. Much of the work on resveratrol and cancer comes from in vitro studies looking at resveratrol actions on cancer cells and pathways. There are, however, comparatively fewer studies that have investigated resveratrol treatment and cancer outcomes in vivo, perhaps limited by its poor bioavailability when taken orally. Although research in cell culture has shown promising and positive effects of resveratrol, evidence from rodents and humans is inconsistent. This review highlights the in vivo effects of resveratrol treatment on breast, colorectal, liver, pancreatic, and prostate cancers. Resveratrol supplementation in animal models of cancer has shown positive, neutral as well as negative outcomes depending on resveratrol route of administration, dose, tumor model, species, and other factors. Within a specific cancer type, there is variability between studies with respect to strain, age, and sex of animal used, timing and method of resveratrol supplementation, and dose of resveratrol used to study cancer endpoints. Together, the data suggest that many factors need to be considered before resveratrol can be used for human cancer prevention or therapy.
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Controlled exercise is a safe pregnancy intervention in mice.
J. Am. Assoc. Lab. Anim. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2013
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During pregnancy, women often show a willingness to make positive lifestyle changes, such as smoking cessation, initiation of a vitamin regimen, improvement of their diet, and increases in their levels of exercise or physical activity. To study health outcomes in both pregnant mice and their offspring, we developed a model of controlled maternal exercise during mouse pregnancy. Female ICR and C57BL/6 mice underwent controlled wheel walking for 1 h daily, 5 d each week, at a speed of 6 m/min prior to and during pregnancy and nursing. Dam body weight, food consumption, pregnancy rates, litter size, pup weights and litter survival were used as markers of pregnancy success and were not significantly affected by controlled maternal exercise. The proposed exercise paradigm is a safe pregnancy intervention and can be explored further.
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Resveratrol improves adipose insulin signaling and reduces the inflammatory response in adipose tissue of rhesus monkeys on high-fat, high-sugar diet.
Cell Metab.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2013
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Obesity is associated with a chronic, low-grade, systemic inflammation that may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Resveratrol, a natural compound with anti-inflammatory properties, is shown to improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in obese mice and humans. Here, we tested the effect of a 2-year resveratrol administration on proinflammatory profile and insulin resistance caused by a high-fat, high-sugar (HFS) diet in white adipose tissue (WAT) from rhesus monkeys. Resveratrol supplementation (80 and 480 mg/day for the first and second year, respectively) decreased adipocyte size, increased sirtuin 1 expression, decreased NF-?B activation, and improved insulin sensitivity in visceral, but not subcutaneous, WAT from HFS-fed animals. These effects were reproduced in 3T3-L1 adipocytes cultured in media supplemented with serum from monkeys fed HFS ± resveratrol diets. In conclusion, chronic administration of resveratrol exerts beneficial metabolic and inflammatory adaptations in visceral WAT from diet-induced obese monkeys.
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Maternal exercise improves insulin sensitivity in mature rat offspring.
Med Sci Sports Exerc
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2013
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Recent findings have shown that the intrauterine environment can negatively influence long-term insulin sensitivity in the offspring. Here we look at maternal voluntary exercise as an intervention to improve offspring insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.
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Resveratrol prevents ?-cell dedifferentiation in nonhuman primates given a high-fat/high-sugar diet.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2013
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Eating a "Westernized" diet high in fat and sugar leads to weight gain and numerous health problems, including the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Rodent studies have shown that resveratrol supplementation reduces blood glucose levels, preserves ?-cells in islets of Langerhans, and improves insulin action. Although rodent models are helpful for understanding ?-cell biology and certain aspects of T2DM pathology, they fail to reproduce the complexity of the human disease as well as that of nonhuman primates. Rhesus monkeys were fed a standard diet (SD), or a high-fat/high-sugar diet in combination with either placebo (HFS) or resveratrol (HFS+Resv) for 24 months, and pancreata were examined before overt dysglycemia occurred. Increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance occurred in both HFS and HFS+Resv diets compared with SD. Although islet size was unaffected, there was a significant decrease in ?-cells and an increase in ?-cells containing glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 with HFS diets. Islets from HFS+Resv monkeys were morphologically similar to SD. HFS diets also resulted in decreased expression of essential ?-cell transcription factors forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), NKX6-1, NKX2-2, and PDX1, which did not occur with resveratrol supplementation. Similar changes were observed in human islets where the effects of resveratrol were mediated through Sirtuin 1. These findings have implications for the management of humans with insulin resistance, prediabetes, and diabetes.
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Perinatal Polychlorinated Biphenyl 126 Exposure Alters Offspring Body Composition.
J Pediatr Biochem
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2013
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Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants whose exposure levels are associated with various health hazards. We hypothesized that in utero and lactational exposure to PCBs can cause changes in body composition and obesity in a mouse model. Pregnant mice were exposed biweekly to two concentrations of PCB 126 via oral gavage. Maternal PCB exposure did not result in heavier offspring, however, dose-dependent and sex specific changes in body composition were observed. Female offspring displayed the most susceptibility to PCB-induced alterations in body composition, having less percent lean body mass and increased adiposity compared to females born to control dams, and these effects were largely dose-dependent. In contrast to females, and independent of the exposure level of PCB 126, male offspring had reduced lean body mass but no change in fat mass compared to males born to control dams. In conclusion, perinatal PCB 126 exposure did not affect body weight, but rather modulated body composition in a dose-dependent and gender-specific manner.
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Mineralocorticoid receptor agonists induce mouse aortic aneurysm formation and rupture in the presence of high salt.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2013
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Elevated plasma aldosterone concentrations in patients have been linked to a spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists provide additional benefits in patients with heart failure. However, whether aldosterone and the mineralocorticoid receptor are involved in aortic aneurysm is unknown.
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Specific sequences in N termini of apolipoprotein A-IV modulate its anorectic effect.
Physiol. Behav.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2013
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Rodent apoA-IV is expressed predominantly in small intestine and also expressed to a small extent in liver and hypothalamus. ApoA-IV has been shown to inhibit food intake in rats when injected centrally. In the current study, we hypothesize that a specific sequence within rat apoA-IV is responsible for mediating the anorectic effect. We use a bacterial expression system to generate truncation mutants (?249-371, ?117-371 and ?1-61) of rat apoA-IV and assess the ability of various regions of the molecule to inhibit food intake. The results indicate that a responsible sequence exists within the N-terminal 61 amino acids of rat apoA-IV. Synthetic peptides (1-30 EVTSDQVANVMWDYFTQLSNNAKEAVEQLQ, 1-15 EVTSDQVANVMWDYF and 17-30 QLSNNAKEAVEQLQ) were used to specify the region in between residues 1 and 30. A 14-mer peptide (17-30) encompassing this sequence was capable of reducing food intake in a dose-dependent manner whereas a peptide designed on a more C-terminal region (211-232) of apoA-IV (QEKLNHQMEGLAFQMKKNAEEL) failed to exhibit the dose-dependent anorectic effect. The isolation of this sequence provides a valuable tool for future work directed at identifying apoA-IV binding proteins and is a key step for exploring the potential of therapeutic manipulation of food intake via this pathway.
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Resveratrol protects against polychlorinated biphenyl-mediated impairment of glucose homeostasis in adipocytes.
J. Nutr. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant polyphenol that exhibits several favorable effects on glucose homeostasis in adipocytes. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that are ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor impair glucose homeostasis in mice. PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis was associated with augmented expression of inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue, a site for accumulation of lipophilic PCBs. This study determined if RSV protects against PCB-77 induced impairment of glucose disposal in vitro and in vivo and if these beneficial effects are associated with enhanced nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling in adipose tissue. PCB-77 increased oxidative stress and abolished insulin stimulated 2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake in 3 T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects were restored by RSV, which resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), the downstream target of Nrf2 signaling. We quantified glucose and insulin tolerance and components of Nrf2 and insulin signaling cascades in adipose tissue of male C57BL/6 mice administered vehicle or PCB-77 (50 mg/kg) and fed a diet with or without resVida (0.1%, or 160 mg/kg per day). PCB-77 impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, and these effects were reversed by RSV. PCB-77 induced reductions in insulin signaling in adipose tissue were also abolished by RSV, which increased NQO1 expression. These results demonstrate that coplanar PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis in mice can be prevented by RSV, potentially through stimulation of Nrf2 signaling and enhanced insulin stimulated glucose disposal in adipose tissue.
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SRT1720 improves survival and healthspan of obese mice.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2011
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Sirt1 is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that extends lifespan in lower organisms and improves metabolism and delays the onset of age-related diseases in mammals. Here we show that SRT1720, a synthetic compound that was identified for its ability to activate Sirt1 in vitro, extends both mean and maximum lifespan of adult mice fed a high-fat diet. This lifespan extension is accompanied by health benefits including reduced liver steatosis, increased insulin sensitivity, enhanced locomotor activity and normalization of gene expression profiles and markers of inflammation and apoptosis, all in the absence of any observable toxicity. Using a conditional SIRT1 knockout mouse and specific gene knockdowns we show SRT1720 affects mitochondrial respiration in a Sirt1- and PGC-1?-dependent manner. These findings indicate that SRT1720 has long-term benefits and demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of designing novel molecules that are safe and effective in promoting longevity and preventing multiple age-related diseases in mammals.
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The arcuate nucleus and neuropeptide Y contribute to the antitumorigenic effect of calorie restriction.
Aging Cell
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2011
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Calorie restriction (CR) is known to have profound effects on tumor incidence. A typical consequence of CR is hunger, and we hypothesized that the neuroendocrine response to CR might in part mediate CRs antitumor effects. We tested CR under appetite suppression using two models: neuropeptide Y (NPY) knockout mice and monosodium glutamate-injected mice. While CR was protective in control mice challenged with a two-stage skin carcinogenesis model, papilloma development was neither delayed nor reduced by CR in the monosodium glutamate-treated and NPY knockout mice. Adiponectin levels were also not increased by CR in the appetite-suppressed mice. We propose that some of CRs beneficial effects cannot be separated from those imposed on appetite, and that NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus are involved in the translation of reduced intake to downstream physiological and functional benefits.
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Oxidative stress accumulates in adipose tissue during aging and inhibits adipogenesis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
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Aging constitutes a major independent risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes and is accompanied by insulin resistance and adipose tissue dysfunction. One of the most important factors implicitly linked to aging and age-related chronic diseases is the accumulation of oxidative stress. However, the effect of increased oxidative stress on adipose tissue biology remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that aging in mice results in a loss of fat mass and the accumulation of oxidative stress in adipose tissue. In vitro, increased oxidative stress through glutathione depletion inhibits preadipocyte differentiation. This inhibition of adipogenesis is at least in part the result of reduced cell proliferation and an inhibition of G(1)?S-phase transition during the initial mitotic clonal expansion of the adipocyte differentiation process. While phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) by cyclin/cdk complexes remains unaffected, oxidative stress decreases the expression of S-phase genes downstream of Rb. This silencing of S phase gene expression by increased oxidative stress is mediated through a transcriptional mechanism involving the inhibition of E2F recruitment and transactivation of its target promoters. Collectively, these data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of oxidative stress in the regulation of adipogenesis which may contribute to age-associated adipose tissue dysfunction.
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Dietary whey protein lowers the risk for metabolic disease in mice fed a high-fat diet.
J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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Consuming a high-fat (HF) diet produces excessive weight gain, adiposity, and metabolic complications associated with risk for developing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease. This study evaluated the influence of whey protein isolate (WPI) on systemic energy balance and metabolic changes in mice fed a HF diet. Female C57BL/6J mice received for 11 wk a HF diet, with or without 100 g WPI/L drinking water. Energy consumption and glucose and lipid metabolism were examined. WPI mice had lower rates of body weight gain and percent body fat and greater lean body mass, although energy consumption was unchanged. These results were consistent with WPI mice having higher basal metabolic rates, respiratory quotients, and hepatic mitochondrial respiration. Health implications for WPI were reflected in early biomarkers for fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Livers from WPI mice had significantly fewer hepatic lipid droplet numbers and less deposition of nonpolar lipids. Furthermore, WPI improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We conclude that in mice receiving a HF diet, consumption of WPI results in higher basal metabolic rates and altered metabolism of dietary lipids. Because WPI mice had less hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance, WPI dietary supplements may be effective in slowing the development of fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes.
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Adaptive induction of NF-E2-related factor-2-driven antioxidant genes in endothelial cells in response to hyperglycemia.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus promotes oxidative stress in endothelial cells, which contributes to development of cardiovascular diseases. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor activated by oxidative stress that regulates expression of numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxifying and antioxidant genes. This study was designed to elucidate the homeostatic role of adaptive induction of Nrf2-driven free radical detoxification mechanisms in endothelial protection under diabetic conditions. Using a Nrf2/antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven luciferase reporter gene assay we found that in a cultured coronary arterial endothelial cell model hyperglycemia (10-30 mmol/l glucose) significantly increases transcriptional activity of Nrf2 and upregulates the expression of the Nrf2 target genes NQO1, GCLC, and HMOX1. These effects of high glucose were significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) downregulation of Nrf2 or overexpression of Keap-1, which inactivates Nrf2. High-glucose-induced upregulation of NQO1, GCLC, and HMOX1 was also prevented by pretreatment with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-catalase or N-acetylcysteine, whereas administration of H(2)O(2) mimicked the effect of high glucose. To test the effects of metabolic stress in vivo, Nrf2(+/+) and Nrf2(-/-) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD elicited significant increases in mRNA expression of Gclc and Hmox1 in aortas of Nrf2(+/+) mice, but not Nrf2(-/-) mice, compared with respective standard diet-fed control mice. Additionally, HFD-induced increases in vascular ROS levels were significantly greater in Nrf2(-/-) than Nrf2(+/+) mice. HFD-induced endothelial dysfunction was more severe in Nrf2(-/-) mice, as shown by the significantly diminished acetylcholine-induced relaxation of aorta of these animals compared with HFD-fed Nrf2(+/+) mice. Our results suggest that adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway confers endothelial protection under diabetic conditions.
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Resveratrol confers endothelial protection via activation of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2010
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Epidemiological studies suggest that Mediterranean diets rich in resveratrol are associated with reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Resveratrol was also shown to confer vasoprotection in animal models of type 2 diabetes and aging. However, the mechanisms by which resveratrol exerts its antioxidative vasculoprotective effects are not completely understood. Using a nuclear factor-E(2)-related factor-2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element-driven luciferase reporter gene assay, we found that in cultured coronary arterial endothelial cells, resveratrol, in a dose-dependent manner, significantly increases transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Accordingly, resveratrol significantly upregulates the expression of the Nrf2 target genes NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and heme oxygenase-1. Resveratrol treatment also significantly attenuated high glucose (30 mM)-induced mitochondrial and cellular oxidative stress (assessed by flow cytometry using MitoSox and dihydroethidine staining). The aforementioned effects of resveratrol were significantly attenuated by the small interfering RNA downregulation of Nrf2 or the overexpression of Kelch-like erythroid cell-derived protein 1, which inactivates Nrf2. To test the effects of resveratrol in vivo, we used mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), which exhibit increased vascular oxidative stress associated with an impaired endothelial function. In HFD-fed Nrf2(+/+) mice, resveratrol treatment attenuates oxidative stress (assessed by the Amplex red assay), improves acetylcholine-induced vasodilation, and inhibits apoptosis (assessed by measuring caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation) in branches of the femoral artery. In contrast, the aforementioned endothelial protective effects of resveratrol were diminished in HFD-fed Nrf2(-/-) mice. Taken together, our results indicate that resveratrol both in vitro and in vivo confers endothelial protective effects which are mediated by the activation of Nrf2.
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JNK1 phosphorylates SIRT1 and promotes its enzymatic activity.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2009
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SIRT1 is a NAD-dependent deacetylase that regulates a variety of pathways including the stress protection pathway. SIRT1 deacetylates a number of protein substrates, including histones, FOXOs, PGC-1alpha, and p53, leading to cellular protection. We identified a functional interaction between cJUN N-terminal kinase (JNK1) and SIRT1 by coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins. The interaction between JNK1 and SIRT1 was identified under conditions of oxidative stress and required activation of JNK1 via phosphorylation. Modulation of SIRT1 activity or protein levels using nicotinamide or RNAi did not modify JNK1 activity as measured by its ability to phosphorylate cJUN. In contrast, human SIRT1 was phosphorylated by JNK1 on three sites: Ser27, Ser47, and Thr530 and this phosphorylation of SIRT1 increased its nuclear localization and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, JNK1 phosphorylation of SIRT1 showed substrate specificity resulting in deacetylation of histone H3, but not p53. These findings identify a mechanism for regulation of SIRT1 enzymatic activity in response to oxidative stress and shed new light on its role in the stress protection pathway.
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Resveratrol induces mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2009
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Pathways that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis are potential therapeutic targets for the amelioration of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Resveratrol was shown to impact mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle and the liver, but its role in mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells remains poorly defined. The present study determined whether resveratrol induces mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured human coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). In CAECs resveratrol increased mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA content, upregulated protein expression of electron transport chain constituents, and induced mitochondrial biogenesis factors (proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator-1alpha, nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A). Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) was induced, and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) was upregulated in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Knockdown of SIRT1 (small interfering RNA) or inhibition of NO synthesis prevented resveratrol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. In aortas of type 2 diabetic (db/db) mice impaired mitochondrial biogenesis was normalized by chronic resveratrol treatment, showing the in vivo relevance of our findings. Resveratrol increases mitochondrial content in endothelial cells via activating SIRT1. We propose that SIRT1, via a pathway that involves the upregulation of eNOS, induces mitochondrial biogenesis. Resveratrol induced mitochondrial biogenesis in the aortas of type 2 diabetic mice, suggesting the potential for new treatment approaches targeting endothelial mitochondria in metabolic diseases.
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Design, validity, and reliability of a pediatric resident JumpSTART disaster triage scoring instrument.
Acad Pediatr
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To design an instrument for scoring residents learning pediatric disaster triage (PDT), and to test the validity and reliability of the instrument.
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Perinatal exercise improves glucose homeostasis in adult offspring.
Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.
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Emerging research has shown that subtle factors during pregnancy and gestation can influence long-term health in offspring. In an attempt to be proactive, we set out to explore whether a nonpharmacological intervention, perinatal exercise, might improve offspring health. Female mice were separated into sedentary or exercise cohorts, with the exercise cohort having voluntary access to a running wheel prior to mating and during pregnancy and nursing. Offspring were weaned, and analyses were performed on the mature offspring that did not have access to running wheels during any portion of their lives. Perinatal exercise caused improved glucose disposal following an oral glucose challenge in both female and male adult offspring (P < 0.05 for both). Blood glucose concentrations were reduced to lower values in response to an intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test for both female and male adult offspring of parents with access to running wheels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Male offspring from exercised dams showed increased percent lean mass and decreased fat mass percent compared with male offspring from sedentary dams (P < 0.01 for both), but these parameters were unchanged in female offspring. These data suggest that short-term maternal voluntary exercise prior to and during healthy pregnancy and nursing can enhance long-term glucose homeostasis in offspring.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.