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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivatives toward the design of micelles for the sustained delivery of hydrophobic drugs.
Carbohydr Polym
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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The idea of this study was to combine hyaluronic acid (HA) viscosupplementation and a local/controlled delivery of a hydrophobic anti-inflammatory drug. To this aim, we investigated the ability of an octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) modified HA (OSA-HA), to act as a solubility enhancer and as a platform for slow release of hydrophobic drug(s). This novel HA derivative could act as a viscosupplementation agent and, for this reason, a rheological study was conducted along with calorimetric analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results revealed that the ability of HA to sequester water is enhanced by the introduction of lipophilic functions within HA molecules, resulting in a decrease of the fraction of free water able to freeze compared to the unmodified HA. Moreover, OSA-HA solutions appear to be an appropriate tool to be used in viscosupplementation therapy owing to their suitable viscoelastic features. Our results indicate that OSA-HA is able to self-assemble into micelles, load a hydrophobic drug and release the active molecule with controlled kinetics. In particular, the analysis of release profiles showed that, in all cases, drug diffusion into the gel is faster compared to gel/drug dissolution, being the dissolution contribution more relevant as the OSA-HA concentration increases.
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Efficacy of cream-based novel formulations of hyaluronic acid of different molecular weights in anti-wrinkle treatment.
J Drugs Dermatol
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2011
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Due to its strong water-binding potential, hyaluronic acid (HA) is a well-known active ingredient for cosmetic applications. Native HA is proposed to help the skin to retain and maintain elasticity, turgor and moisture.
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Biophysical properties of phenyl succinic acid derivatised hyaluronic acid.
J Fluoresc
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2009
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Modification of hyaluronic acid (HA) with aryl succinic anhydrides results in new biomedical properties of HA as compared to non-modified HA, such as more efficient skin penetration, stronger binding to the skin, and the ability to blend with hydrophobic materials. In the present study, hyaluronic acid has been derivatised with the anhydride form of phenyl succinic acid (PheSA). The fluorescence of PheSA was efficiently quenched by the HA matrix. HA also acted as a singlet oxygen scavenger. Fluorescence lifetime(s) of PheSA in solution and when attached to the HA matrix has been monitored with ps resolved streak camera technology. Structural and fluorescence properties changes induced on HA-PheSA due to the presence of singlet oxygen were monitored using static light scattering (SLS), steady state fluorescence and ps time resolved fluorescence studies. SLS studies provided insight into the depolymerisation kinetics of PheSA derivatised HA matrix in the presence of singlet oxygen. Time resolved fluorescence studies grave insight into the dynamics of the reaction mechanisms induced on HA-PheSA by singlet oxygen. These studies provided insight into the medical relevance of PheSA derivatised HA: its capacity of scavenging singlet oxygen and of quenching PheSA fluorescence. These studies revealed that HA-PheSA is a strong quencher of electronic excited state PheSA and acts as a scavenger of singlet oxygen, thus medical applications of this derivatised form of HA may protect tissues and organs, such as skin, against reactive oxygen species damage.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.