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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Filovirus RefSeq entries: evaluation and selection of filovirus type variants, type sequences, and names.
Viruses
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2014
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Sequence determination of complete or coding-complete genomes of viruses is becoming common practice for supporting the work of epidemiologists, ecologists, virologists, and taxonomists. Sequencing duration and costs are rapidly decreasing, sequencing hardware is under modification for use by non-experts, and software is constantly being improved to simplify sequence data management and analysis. Thus, analysis of virus disease outbreaks on the molecular level is now feasible, including characterization of the evolution of individual virus populations in single patients over time. The increasing accumulation of sequencing data creates a management problem for the curators of commonly used sequence databases and an entry retrieval problem for end users. Therefore, utilizing the data to their fullest potential will require setting nomenclature and annotation standards for virus isolates and associated genomic sequences. The National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI's) RefSeq is a non-redundant, curated database for reference (or type) nucleotide sequence records that supplies source data to numerous other databases. Building on recently proposed templates for filovirus variant naming [ ()////-], we report consensus decisions from a majority of past and currently active filovirus experts on the eight filovirus type variants and isolates to be represented in RefSeq, their final designations, and their associated sequences.
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Comparative analysis of SIV-specific cellular immune responses induced by different vaccine platforms in rhesus macaques.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2014
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To identify the most promising vaccine candidates for combinatorial strategies, we compared five SIV vaccine platforms including recombinant canary pox virus ALVAC, replication-competent adenovirus type 5 host range mutant RepAd, DNA, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), peptides and protein in distinct combinations. Three regimens used viral vectors (prime or boost) and two regimens used plasmid DNA. Analysis at necropsy showed that the DNA-based vaccine regimens elicited significantly higher cellular responses against Gag and Env than any of the other vaccine platforms. The T cell responses induced by most vaccine regimens disseminated systemically into secondary lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, spleen) and effector anatomical sites (including liver, vaginal tissue), indicative of their role in viral containment at the portal of entry. The cellular and reported humoral immune response data suggest that combination of DNA and viral vectors elicits a balanced immunity with strong and durable responses able to disseminate into relevant mucosal sites.
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Humoral immunity induced by mucosal and/or systemic SIV-specific vaccine platforms suggests novel combinatorial approaches for enhancing responses.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Combinatorial HIV/SIV vaccine approaches targeting multiple arms of the immune system might improve protective efficacy. We compared SIV-specific humoral immunity induced in rhesus macaques by five vaccine regimens. Systemic regimens included ALVAC-SIVenv priming and Env boosting (ALVAC/Env); DNA immunization; and DNA plus Env co-immunization (DNA&Env). RepAd/Env combined mucosal replication-competent Ad-env priming with systemic Env boosting. A Peptide/Env regimen, given solely intrarectally, included HIV/SIV peptides followed by MVA-env and Env boosts. Serum antibodies mediating neutralizing, phagocytic and ADCC activities were induced by ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env and DNA&Env vaccines. Memory B cells and plasma cells were maintained in the bone marrow. RepAd/Env vaccination induced early SIV-specific IgA in rectal secretions before Env boosting, although mucosal IgA and IgG responses were readily detected at necropsy in ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env, DNA&Env and DNA vaccinated animals. Our results suggest that combined RepAd priming with ALVAC/Env or DNA&Env regimen boosting might induce potent, functional, long-lasting systemic and mucosal SIV-specific antibodies.
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Transcriptome analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to Lassa virus and to the attenuated Mopeia/Lassa reassortant 29 (ML29), a vaccine candidate.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2013
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Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV) are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease.
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Virus nomenclature below the species level: a standardized nomenclature for filovirus strains and variants rescued from cDNA.
Arch. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2013
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Specific alterations (mutations, deletions, insertions) of virus genomes are crucial for the functional characterization of their regulatory elements and their expression products, as well as a prerequisite for the creation of attenuated viruses that could serve as vaccine candidates. Virus genome tailoring can be performed either by using traditionally cloned genomes as starting materials, followed by site-directed mutagenesis, or by de novo synthesis of modified virus genomes or parts thereof. A systematic nomenclature for such recombinant viruses is necessary to set them apart from wild-type and laboratory-adapted viruses, and to improve communication and collaborations among researchers who may want to use recombinant viruses or create novel viruses based on them. A large group of filovirus experts has recently proposed nomenclatures for natural and laboratory animal-adapted filoviruses that aim to simplify the retrieval of sequence data from electronic databases. Here, this work is extended to include nomenclature for filoviruses obtained in the laboratory via reverse genetics systems. The previously developed template for natural filovirus genetic variant naming, (/)///-, is retained, but we propose to adapt the type of information added to each field for cDNA clone-derived filoviruses. For instance, the full-length designation of an Ebola virus Kikwit variant rescued from a plasmid developed at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could be akin to "Ebola virus H.sapiens-rec/COD/1995/Kikwit-abc1" (with the suffix "rec" identifying the recombinant nature of the virus and "abc1" being a placeholder for any meaningful isolate designator). Such a full-length designation should be used in databases and the methods section of publications. Shortened designations (such as "EBOV H.sap/COD/95/Kik-abc1") and abbreviations (such as "EBOV/Kik-abc1") could be used in the remainder of the text, depending on how critical it is to convey information contained in the full-length name. "EBOV" would suffice if only one EBOV strain/variant/isolate is addressed.
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Japanese womens experiences of pharmacological pain relief in New Zealand.
Women Birth
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2013
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In Japan, most women manage labour pain without pharmacological interventions. However, New Zealand statistics show a high percentage of epidural use amongst Asian women. Entonox (a gas mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen) and pethidine are also available to women in New Zealand. This article investigates how Japanese women in New Zealand respond to the use of pharmacological pain relief in labour.
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A novel adenovirus species associated with an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony and evidence of coincident human infection.
MBio
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2013
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Adenoviruses (AdVs) are DNA viruses that infect many vertebrate hosts, including humans and nonhuman primates. Here we identify a novel AdV species, provisionally named "simian adenovirus C (SAdV-C)," associated with a 1997 outbreak of acute respiratory illness in captive baboons (4 of 9) at a primate research facility in Texas. None of the six AdVs recovered from baboons (BaAdVs) during the outbreak, including the two baboons who died from pneumonia, were typeable. Since clinical samples from the two fatal cases were not available, whole-genome sequencing of nasal isolates from one sick baboon and three asymptomatic baboons during the outbreak was performed. Three AdVs were members of species SAdV-C (BaAdV-2 and BaAdV-4 were genetically identical, and BaAdV-3), while one (BaAdV-1) was a member of the recently described SAdV-B species. BaAdV-3 was the only AdV among the 4 isolated from a sick baboon, and thus was deemed to be the cause of the outbreak. Significant divergence (<58% amino acid identity) was found in one of the fiber proteins of BaAdV-3 relative to BaAdV-2 and -4, suggesting that BaAdV-3 may be a rare SAdV-C recombinant. Neutralizing antibodies to the other 3 AdVs, but not BaAdV-3, were detected in healthy baboons from 1996 to 2003 and staff personnel from 1997. These results implicate a novel adenovirus species (SAdV-C) in an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony and underscore the potential for cross-species transmission of AdVs between humans and nonhuman primates. IMPORTANCE Adenoviruses (AdVs) are DNA viruses that infect many animals, including humans and monkeys. In 1997, an outbreak of acute respiratory illness from AdVs occurred in a baboon colony in Texas. Here we use whole-genome sequencing and antibody testing to investigate new AdVs in baboons (BaAdVs) during the outbreak, one of which, BaAdV-3, came from a sick animal. By sequence analysis, BaAdV-3 may be a recombinant strain that arose from a related BaAdV found in baboons nearby in the colony (who were not sick) and yet another unknown AdV. We also found antibodies to these new BaAdVs in baboons and staff personnel at the facility. Taken together, our findings of a new AdV species as the cause of an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony underscore the ongoing threat from emerging viruses that may carry the potential for cross-species transmission between monkeys and humans.
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Ebola virus does not block apoptotic signaling pathways.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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Since viruses rely on functional cellular machinery for efficient propagation, apoptosis is an important mechanism to fight viral infections. In this study, we sought to determine the mechanism of cell death caused by Ebola virus (EBOV) infection by assaying for multiple stages of apoptosis and hallmarks of necrosis. Our data indicate that EBOV does not induce apoptosis in infected cells but rather leads to a nonapoptotic form of cell death. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed necrotic cell death of EBOV-infected cells. To investigate if EBOV blocks the induction of apoptosis, infected cells were treated with different apoptosis-inducing agents. Surprisingly, EBOV-infected cells remained sensitive to apoptosis induced by external stimuli. Neither receptor- nor mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis signaling was inhibited in EBOV infection. Although double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced activation of protein kinase R (PKR) was blocked in EBOV-infected cells, induction of apoptosis mediated by dsRNA was not suppressed. When EBOV-infected cells were treated with dsRNA-dependent caspase recruiter (dsCARE), an antiviral protein that selectively induces apoptosis in cells containing dsRNA, virus titers were strongly reduced. These data show that the inability of EBOV to block apoptotic pathways may open up new strategies toward the development of antiviral therapeutics.
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A systematic screen of FDA-approved drugs for inhibitors of biological threat agents.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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The rapid development of effective medical countermeasures against potential biological threat agents is vital. Repurposing existing drugs that may have unanticipated activities as potential countermeasures is one way to meet this important goal, since currently approved drugs already have well-established safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in patients, as well as manufacturing and distribution networks. Therefore, approved drugs could rapidly be made available for a new indication in an emergency.
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Sequence variability in viral genome non-coding regions likely contribute to observed differences in viral replication amongst MARV strains.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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The Marburg viruses Musoke (MARV-Mus) and Angola (MARV-Ang) have highly similar genomic sequences. Analysis of viral replication using various assays consistently identified MARV-Ang as the faster replicating virus. Non-coding genomic regions of negative sense RNA viruses are known to play a role in viral gene expression. A comparison of the six non-coding regions using bicistronic minigenomes revealed that the first two non-coding regions (NP/VP35 and VP35/VP40) differed significantly in their transcriptional regulation. Deletion mutation analysis of the MARV-Mus NP/VP35 region further revealed that the MARV polymerase (L) is able to initiate production of the downstream gene without the presence of highly conserved regulatory signals. Bicistronic minigenome assays also identified the VP30 mRNA 5 untranslated region as an rZAP-targeted RNA motif. Overall, our studies indicate that the high variation of MARV non-coding regions may play a significant role in observed differences in transcription and/or replication.
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Antibodies to gp120 and PD-1 expression on virus-specific CD8+ T cells in protection from simian AIDS.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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We compared the relative efficacies against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge of three vaccine regimens that elicited similar frequencies of SIV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses but differed in the level of antibody responses to the gp120 envelope protein. All macaques were primed with DNA plasmids expressing SIV gag, pol, env, and Retanef genes and were boosted with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) expressing the same genes, either once (1 × MVA) or twice (2 × MVA), or were boosted once with MVA followed by a single boost with replication-competent adenovirus (Ad) type 5 host range mutant (Ad5 h) expressing SIV gag and nef genes but not Retanef or env (1 × MVA/Ad5). While two of the vaccine regimens (1 × MVA and 1 × MVA/Ad5) protected from high levels of SIV replication only during the acute phase of infection, the 2 × MVA regimen, with the highest anti-SIV gp120 titers, protected during the acute phase and transiently during the chronic phase of infection. Mamu-A*01 macaques of this third group exhibited persistent Gag CD8(+)CM9(+) effector memory T cells with low expression of surface Programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor and high levels of expression of genes associated with major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II antigen. The fact that control of SIV replication was associated with both high titers of antibodies to the SIV envelope protein and durable effector SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells suggests the hypothesis that the presence of antibodies at the time of challenge may increase innate immune recruiting activity by enhancing antigen uptake and may result in improvement of the quality and potency of secondary SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses.
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Filoviruses utilize glycosaminoglycans for their attachment to target cells.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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Filoviruses are the cause of severe hemorrhagic fever in human and nonhuman primates. The envelope glycoprotein (GP), responsible for both receptor binding and fusion of the virus envelope with the host cell membrane, has been demonstrated to interact with multiple molecules in order to enhance entry into host cells. Here we have demonstrated that filoviruses utilize glycosaminoglycans, and more specifically heparan sulfate proteoglycans, for their attachment to host cells. This interaction is mediated by GP and does not require the presence of the mucin domain. Both the degree of sulfation and the structure of the carbohydrate backbone play a role in the interaction with filovirus GPs. This new step of filovirus interaction with host cells can potentially be a new target for antiviral strategies. As such, we were able to inhibit filovirus GP-mediated infection using carrageenan, a broad-spectrum microbicide that mimics heparin, and also using the antiviral dendrimeric peptide SB105-A10, which interacts with heparan sulfate, antagonizing the binding of the virus to cells.
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Experimental cross-species infection of common marmosets by titi monkey adenovirus.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV), as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses.
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A small nonhuman primate model for filovirus-induced disease.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2011
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Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus are members of the filovirus family and induce a fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates with 90% case fatality. To develop a small nonhuman primate model for filovirus disease, common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were intramuscularly inoculated with wild type Marburgvirus Musoke or Ebolavirus Zaire. The infection resulted in a systemic fatal disease with clinical and morphological features closely resembling human infection. Animals experienced weight loss, fever, high virus titers in tissue, thrombocytopenia, neutrophilia, high liver transaminases and phosphatases and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Evidence of a severe disseminated viral infection characterized principally by multifocal to coalescing hepatic necrosis was seen in EBOV animals. MARV-infected animals displayed only moderate fibrin deposition in the spleen. Lymphoid necrosis and lymphocytic depletion observed in spleen. These findings provide support for the use of the common marmoset as a small nonhuman primate model for filovirus induced hemorrhagic fever.
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Vaccines against viral hemorrhagic fevers: non-human primate models.
Hum Vaccin
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
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Viral hemorrhagic fevers are a group of disease syndromes caused by infection with certain RNA viruses. The disease is marked by a febrile response, malaise, coagulopathy and vascular permeability culminating in death. Case fatality rates can reach 90% depending on the etiologic agent. Currently, there is no approved antiviral treatment. Because of the high case fatality, risk of importation and the potential to use these agents as biological weapons, development of countermeasures to these agents is a high priority. The sporadic nature of disease outbreaks and the ethical issues associated with conducting a human trial for such diseases make human studies impractical; therefore, development of countermeasures must occur in relevant animal models. Non-human primates are superior models to study infectious disease because their immune system is similar to humans and they are good predictors of efficacy in vaccine development and other intervention strategies. This review article summarizes viral hemorrhagic fever non-human primate models.
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Strong viremia control in vaccinated macaques does not prevent gradual Th17 cell loss from central memory.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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It has been proposed that microbial translocation might play a role in chronic immune activation during HIV/SIV infection. Key roles in fighting bacterial and fungal infections have been attributed to Th17 and Tc17 cells. Th17 cells can be infected with HIV/SIV, however whether effective vaccination leads to their maintenance following viral challenge has not been addressed. Here we retrospectively investigated if a vaccine regimen that potently reduced viremia post-challenge preserved Th17 and Tc17 cells, thus adding benefit in the absence of sterilizing protection. Rhesus macaques were previously vaccinated with replication-competent Adenovirus recombinants expressing HIVtat and HIVenv followed by Tat and gp140 protein boosting. Upon SHIV(89.6P) challenge, the vaccines exhibited a significant 4 log reduction in chronic viremia compared to sham vaccinated controls which rapidly progressed to AIDS [39]. Plasma and cryopreserved PBMC samples were examined pre-challenge and during acute and chronic infection. Control macaques exhibited a rapid loss of CD4(+) cells, including Th17 cells. Tc17 cells tended to decline over the course of infection although significance was not reached. Immune activation, assessed by Ki-67 expression, was associated with elevated chronic viremia of the controls. Significantly increased plasma IFN-? levels were also observed. No increase in plasma LPS levels were observed suggesting a lack of microbial translocation. In contrast, vaccinated macaques had no evidence of immune activation within the chronic phase and preserved both CD4(+) T-cells and Tc17 cells in PBMC. Nevertheless, they exhibited a gradual, significant loss of Th17 cells which concomitantly displayed significantly higher CCR6 expression over time. The gradual Th17 cell decline may reflect mucosal homing to inflammatory sites and/or slow depletion due to ongoing low levels of SHIV replication. Our results suggest that potent viremia reduction during chronic SHIV infection will delay but not prevent the loss of Th17 cells.
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Vaccine-elicited SIV and HIV envelope-specific IgA and IgG memory B cells in rhesus macaque peripheral blood correlate with functional antibody responses and reduced viremia.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2011
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An effective HIV vaccine requires strong systemic and mucosal, cellular and humoral immunity. Numerous non-human primate studies have investigated memory T cells, but not memory B cells. Humoral immunologic memory is mediated by long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and differentiation of memory B cells into short-lived plasma blasts following re-exposure to immunizing antigen. Here we studied memory B cells in vaccinated rhesus macaques. PBMC were stimulated polyclonally using CD40 Ligand, IL-21 and CpG to induce B cell proliferation and differentiation into antibody secreting cells (ASCs). Flow cytometry was used for phenotyping and evaluating proliferation by CFSE dilution. B cell responses were quantified by ELISPOT. Methodology was established using PBMC of vaccinated elite-controller macaques that exhibited strong, multi-functional antibody activities. Subsequently, memory B cells elicited by two replicating Ad-recombinant prime/envelope boost regimens were retrospectively evaluated pre- and post-SIV and SHIV challenges. The vaccine regimens induced SIV and HIV Env-specific IgG and IgA memory B cells. Prior to challenge, IgA memory B cells were more numerous than IgG memory B cells, reflecting the mucosal priming immunizations. Pre- and post-challenge memory B cells were correlated with functional antibody responses including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI) and transcytosis inhibition. Post-challenge, Env-specific IgG and IgA memory B cells were correlated with reduced chronic viremia. We conclude that functional antibody responses elicited by our prime/boost regimen were effectively incorporated into the memory B cell pool where they contributed to control of viremia following re-exposure to the immunizing antigen.
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Rapid SIV Env-specific mucosal and serum antibody induction augments cellular immunity in protecting immunized, elite-controller macaques against high dose heterologous SIV challenge.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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Three Indian rhesus macaques, Ad-SIV primed/protein boosted and exposed twice to high-dose mucosal SIV(mac251) challenges, exhibited elite control of viremia over 6.5 years. They were negative for host factors associated with control of SIV infection. After a third intrarectal challenge with SIV(smE660), all controlled viremia, with one (macaque #5) maintaining undetectable viremia in blood. Acquisition was not blocked, but virus was contained in the jejunum and draining lymph nodes. Polyfunctional memory T cell responses and high-titered neutralizing and non-neutralizing serum and mucosal antibodies were present before and maintained post-challenge. The level of protection seen for animal #5 was predicted from analyses of gene transcription in jejunum 2 weeks post-challenge. Macaques #7 and #9, exhibiting lower pre-challenge cellular and humoral immunity, partially controlled the SIV(smE660) challenge. Initial vaccine-induced control by macaque #5 extended to the SIV(smE660) challenge due to multiple immune mechanisms that were boosted and augmented by cryptic SIV exposure.
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Genomic analysis reveals pre- and postchallenge differences in a rhesus macaque AIDS vaccine trial: insights into mechanisms of vaccine efficacy.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2010
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We have employed global transcriptional profiling of whole blood to identify biologically relevant changes in cellular gene expression in response to alternative AIDS vaccine strategies with subsequent viral challenge in a rhesus macaque vaccine model. Samples were taken at day 0 (prechallenge), day 14 (peak viremia), and week 12 (set point) from animals immunized with replicating adenovirus type 5 host range (Ad5hr) recombinant viruses expressing human immunodeficiency virus HIV(env)(89.6P), simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(gag)(239), or SIV(nef)(239) alone or in combination with two intramuscular boosts with HIV(89.6P)gp140?CFI protein (L. J. Patterson et al., Virology 374:322-337, 2008), and each treatment resulted in significant control of viremia following simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(89.6P) challenge (six animals per group plus six controls). At day 0, 8 weeks after the last treatment, the microarray profiles revealed significant prechallenge differences between treatment groups; data from the best-protected animals led to identification of a network of genes related to B cell development and lymphocyte survival. At peak viremia, expression profiles of the immunized groups were extremely similar, and comparisons to control animals reflected immunological differences other than effector T cell functions. Suggested protective mechanisms for vaccinated animals included upregulation of interleukin-27, a cytokine known to inhibit lentivirus replication, and increased expression of complement components, which may synergize with vaccine-induced antibodies. Divergent expression profiles at set point for the immunized groups implied distinct immunological responses despite phenotypic similarities in viral load and CD4(+) T cell levels. Data for the gp140-boosted group provided evidence for antibody-dependent, cell-mediated viral control, whereas animals immunized with only the replicating Ad5hr recombinants exhibited a different evolution of the B cell compartment even at 3 months postchallenge. This study demonstrates the sensitivity and discrimination of gene expression profiling of whole blood as an analytical tool in AIDS vaccine trials, providing unique insights into in vivo mechanisms and potential correlates of protection.
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Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2010
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Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV-GP1 and -GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF proteins and LASV GP antigens in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa.
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Evaluation of RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus vaccine, in a non-human primate model of West Nile virus infection.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2010
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West Nile virus (WNV) causes serious neurologic disease, but no licensed vaccines are available to prevent this disease in humans. We have developed RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus with an expected safety profile superior to other types of live-attenuated viral vaccines. In this report we describe studies examining RepliVAX WN safety, potency, and efficacy in a non-human primate model of WNV infection. A single immunization of four rhesus macaques with RepliVAX WN was safe and elicited detectable neutralizing antibody titers and IgM and IgG responses, and IgG titers were increased in two animals that received a second immunization. After challenge with WNV, three of four immunized animals were completely protected from viremia, and the remaining animal showed minimal viremia on one day. In contrast, the unvaccinated animal developed viremia that lasted six days. These results demonstrate the efficacy and safety of RepliVAX WN in this primate model of WNV infection.
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Multiple vaccine-elicited nonneutralizing antienvelope antibody activities contribute to protective efficacy by reducing both acute and chronic viremia following simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIV89.6P challenge in rhesus macaques.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2010
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We have shown that following priming with replicating adenovirus type 5 host range mutant (Ad5hr)-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) recombinants, boosting with gp140 envelope protein enhances acute-phase protection against intravenous simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)(89.6P) challenge compared to results with priming and no boosting or boosting with an HIV polypeptide representing the CD4 binding site of gp120. We retrospectively analyzed antibodies in sera and rectal secretions from these same macaques, investigating the hypothesis that vaccine-elicited nonneutralizing antibodies contributed to the better protection. Compared to other immunized groups or controls, the gp140-boosted group exhibited significantly greater antibody activities mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI) in sera and transcytosis inhibition in rectal secretions. ADCC and ADCVI activities were directly correlated with antibody avidity, suggesting the importance of antibody maturation for functionality. Both ADCVI and percent ADCC killing prechallenge were significantly correlated with reduced acute viremia. The latter, as well as postchallenge ADCVI and ADCC, was also significantly correlated with reduced chronic viremia. We have previously demonstrated induction by the prime/boost regimen of mucosal antibodies that inhibit transcytosis of SIV across an intact epithelial cell layer. Here, antibody in rectal secretions was significantly correlated with transcytosis inhibition. Importantly, the transcytosis specific activity (percent inhibition/total secretory IgA and IgG) was strongly correlated with reduced chronic viremia, suggesting that mucosal antibody may help control cell-to-cell viral spread during the course of infection. Overall, the replicating Ad5hr-HIV/SIV priming/gp140 protein boosting approach elicited strong systemic and mucosal antibodies with multiple functional activities associated with control of both acute and chronic viremia.
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Protection against lethal challenge by Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
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Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced in insect cells using a recombinant baculovirus expression system and their efficacy for protection against Ebola virus infection was investigated. Two immunizations with 50 microg Ebola VLPs (high dose) induced a high level of antibodies against Ebola GP that exhibited strong neutralizing activity against GP-mediated virus infection and conferred complete protection of vaccinated mice against lethal challenge by a high dose of mouse-adapted Ebola virus. In contrast, two immunizations with 10 microg Ebola VLPs (low dose) induced 5-fold lower levels of antibodies against GP and these mice were not protected against lethal Ebola virus challenge, similar to control mice that were immunized with 50 microg SIV Gag VLPs. However, the antibody responses against GP were boosted significantly after a third immunization with 10 microg Ebola VLPs to similar levels as those induced by two immunizations with 50 microg Ebola VLPs, and vaccinated mice were also effectively protected against lethal Ebola virus challenge. Furthermore, serum viremia levels in protected mice were either below the level of detection or significantly lower compared to the viremia levels in control mice. These results show that effective protection can be achieved by immunization with Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells, which give high production yields, and lend further support to their development as an effective vaccine strategy against Ebola virus.
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The impact of regulations, safety considerations and physical limitations on research progress at maximum biocontainment.
Viruses
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We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review.
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NK and CD4+ T cell cooperative immune responses correlate with control of disease in a macaque simian immunodeficiency virus infection model.
J. Immunol.
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Control of infectious disease may be accomplished by successful vaccination or by complex immunologic and genetic factors favoring Ag-specific multicellular immune responses. Using a rhesus macaque model, we evaluated Ag-specific T cell-dependent NK cell immune responses in SIV-infected macaques, designated "controlling" or "noncontrolling" based on long-term chronic viremia levels, to determine whether NK cell effector functions contribute to control of SIV infection. We observed that Gag stimulation of macaque PBMCs induced subset-specific NK cell responses in SIV-controlling but not SIV-noncontrolling animals, as well as that circulatory NK cell responses were dependent on Ag-specific IL-2 production by CD4(+) central memory T cells. NK cell activation was blocked by anti-IL-2-neutralizing Ab and by CD4(+) T cell depletion, which abrogated the Gag-specific responses. Among tissue-resident cells, splenic and circulatory NK cells displayed similar activation profiles, whereas liver and mucosal NK cells displayed a decreased activation profile, similar in SIV-controlling and -noncontrolling macaques. Lack of T cell-dependent NK cell function was rescued in SIV-noncontrolling macaques through drug-mediated control of viremia. Our results indicate that control of disease progression in SIV-controlling macaques is associated with cooperation between Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells and NK cell effector function, which highlight the importance of such cell-to-cell cooperativity in adaptive immunity and suggest that this interaction should be further investigated in HIV vaccine development and other prophylactic vaccine approaches.
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An animal model that reflects human disease: the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).
Curr Opin Virol
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The common marmoset is a new world primate belonging to the Callitrichidae family weighing between 350 and 400 g. The marmoset has been shown to be an outstanding model for studying aging, reproduction, neuroscience, toxicology, and infectious disease. With regard to their susceptibility to infectious agents, they are exquisite NHP models for viral, protozoan and bacterial agents, as well as prions. The marmoset provides the advantages of a small animal model in high containment coupled with the immunological repertoire of a nonhuman primate and susceptibility to wild type, non-adapted viruses.
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Replicating adenovirus-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vectors efficiently prime SIV-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses by targeting myeloid dendritic cells and persisting in rectal macrophages, regardless of immunization route.
Clin. Vaccine Immunol.
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Although priming with replicating adenovirus type 5 host range mutant (Ad5hr)-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) recombinants, followed by HIV/SIV envelope boosting, has proven highly immunogenic, resulting in protection from SIV/simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenges, Ad5hr recombinant distribution, replication, and persistence have not been examined comprehensively in nonhuman primates. We utilized Ad5hr-green fluorescent protein and Ad5hr-SIV recombinants to track biodistribution and immunogenicity following mucosal priming of rhesus macaques by the intranasal/intratracheal, sublingual, vaginal, or rectal route. Ad recombinants administered by all routes initially targeted macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and rectal tissue, later extending to myeloid dendritic cells in BAL fluid with persistent expression in rectal mucosa 25 weeks after the last Ad immunization. Comparable SIV-specific immunity, including cellular responses, serum binding antibody, and mucosal secretory IgA, was elicited among all groups. The ability of the vector to replicate in multiple mucosal sites irrespective of delivery route, together with the targeting of macrophages and professional antigen-presenting cells, which provide potent immunogenicity at localized sites of virus entry, warrants continued use of replicating Ad vectors.
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Replicating adenovirus-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) recombinant priming and envelope protein boosting elicits localized, mucosal IgA immunity in rhesus macaques correlated with delayed acquisition following a repeated low-dose rectal SIV(mac251) ch
J. Virol.
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We have shown that sequential replicating adenovirus type 5 host range mutant human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) recombinant priming delivered first intranasally (i.n.) plus orally and then intratracheally (i.t.), followed by envelope protein boosting, elicits broad cellular immunity and functional, envelope-specific serum and mucosal antibodies that correlate with protection from high-dose SIV and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenges in rhesus macaques. Here we extended these studies to compare the standard i.n./i.t. regimen with additional mucosal administration routes, including sublingual, rectal, and vaginal routes. Similar systemic cellular and humoral immunity was elicited by all immunization routes. Central and effector memory T cell responses were also elicited by the four immunization routes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and jejunal, rectal, and vaginal tissue samples. Cellular responses in vaginal tissue were more compartmentalized, being induced primarily by intravaginal administration. In contrast, all immunization routes elicited secretory IgA (sIgA) responses at multiple mucosal sites. Following a repeated low-dose intrarectal (i.r.) challenge with SIV(mac251) at a dose transmitting one or two variants, protection against acquisition was not achieved except in one macaque in the i.r. immunized group. All immunized macaques exhibited reduced peak viremia compared to that of controls, correlated inversely with prechallenge serum antienvelope avidity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) titers, and percent antibody-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition. Both antibody avidity and ADCC titers were correlated with the number of exposures required for infection. Notably, we show for the first time a significant correlation of vaccine-induced sIgA titers in rectal secretions with delayed acquisition. Further investigation of the characteristics and properties of the sIgA should elucidate the mechanism leading to this protective effect.
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Discussions and decisions of the 2012-2014 International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Filoviridae Study Group, January 2012-June 2013.
Arch. Virol.
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The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Filoviridae Study Group prepares proposals on the classification and nomenclature of filoviruses to reflect current knowledge or to correct disagreements with the International Code of Virus Classification and Nomenclature (ICVCN). In recent years, filovirus taxonomy has been corrected and updated, but parts of it remain controversial, and several topics remain to be debated. This article summarizes the decisions and discussion of the currently acting ICTV Filoviridae Study Group since its inauguration in January 2012.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.