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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Label-free microscopic assessment of glioblastoma biopsy specimens prior to biobanking [corrected].
Neurosurg Focus
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor with a median 12- to 15-month patient survival. Improving patient survival involves better understanding the biological mechanisms of glioblastoma tumorigenesis and seeking targeted molecular therapies. Central to furthering these advances is the collection and storage of surgical biopsies (biobanking) for research. This paper addresses an imaging modality, confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM), for safely screening glioblastoma biopsy samples prior to biobanking to increase the quality of tissue provided for research and clinical trials. These data indicate that CRM can immediately identify cellularity of tissue biopsies from animal models of glioblastoma. When screening fresh human biopsy samples, CRM can differentiate a cellular glioblastoma biopsy from a necrotic biopsy without altering DNA, RNA, or protein expression of sampled tissue. These data illustrate CRM's potential for rapidly and safely screening clinical biopsy samples prior to biobanking, which demonstrates its potential as an effective screening technique that can improve the quality of tissue biobanked for patients with glioblastoma.
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Identification of extracellular miRNA in human cerebrospinal fluid by next-generation sequencing.
RNA
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2013
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There has been a growing interest in using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to profile extracellular small RNAs from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with neurological diseases, CNS tumors, or traumatic brain injury for biomarker discovery. Small sample volumes and samples with low RNA abundance create challenges for downstream small RNA sequencing assays. Plasma, serum, and CSF contain low amounts of total RNA, of which small RNAs make up a fraction. The purpose of this study was to maximize RNA isolation from RNA-limited samples and apply these methods to profile the miRNA in human CSF by small RNA deep sequencing. We systematically tested RNA isolation efficiency using ten commercially available kits and compared their performance on human plasma samples. We used RiboGreen to quantify total RNA yield and custom TaqMan assays to determine the efficiency of small RNA isolation for each of the kits. We significantly increased the recovery of small RNA by repeating the aqueous extraction during the phenol-chloroform purification in the top performing kits. We subsequently used the methods with the highest small RNA yield to purify RNA from CSF and serum samples from the same individual. We then prepared small RNA sequencing libraries using Illuminas TruSeq sample preparation kit and sequenced the samples on the HiSeq 2000. Not surprisingly, we found that the miRNA expression profile of CSF is substantially different from that of serum. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the small RNA fraction from CSF has been profiled using next-generation sequencing.
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Comparison of Analysis Tools for miRNA High Throughput Sequencing Using Nerve Crush as a Model.
Front Genet
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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Recent advances in sample preparation and analysis for next generation sequencing have made it possible to profile and discover new miRNAs in a high throughput manner. In the case of neurological disease and injury, these types of experiments have been more limited. Possibly because tissues such as the brain and spinal cord are inaccessible for direct sampling in living patients, and indirect sampling of blood and cerebrospinal fluid are affected by low amounts of RNA. We used a mouse model to examine changes in miRNA expression in response to acute nerve crush. We assayed miRNA from both muscle tissue and blood plasma. We examined how the depth of coverage (the number of mapped reads) changed the number of detectable miRNAs in each sample type. We also found that samples with very low starting amounts of RNA (mouse plasma) made high depth of mature miRNA coverage more difficult to obtain. Each tissue must be assessed independently for the depth of coverage required to adequately power detection of differential expression, weighed against the cost of sequencing that sample to the adequate depth. We explored the changes in total mapped reads and differential expression results generated by three different software packages: miRDeep2, miRNAKey, and miRExpress and two different analysis packages, DESeq and EdgeR. We also examine the accuracy of using miRDeep2 to predict novel miRNAs and subsequently detect them in the samples using qRT-PCR.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.