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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Brentuximab vedotin administered to platinum-refractory, transplant-naïve Hodgkin lymphoma patients can increase the proportion achieving FDG PET negative status.
Hematol Oncol
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2014
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Normalization of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging prior to high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) improves outcomes in relapsed and refractory (RR) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), but many patients refractory to platinum-based salvage regimens are unable to achieve this goal. We therefore investigated whether brentuximab vedotin (BV) could normalize FDG PET in platinum-refractory HL prior to ASCT. Fifteen consecutive patients with RR HL and FDG PET positive disease after platinum-based salvage therapy were treated with a median of 4 cycles of BV. Normalization of FDG PET (Deauville ?2) occurred in 8/15 (53%) patients but was only observed in patients that had achieved partial remission or stable disease after platinum-based salvage therapy. All patients eventually proceeded to ASCT, regardless of FDG PET status. Our data suggest that BV can normalize FDG PET in a subset of patients with platinum-refractory HL prior to ASCT. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Early Failure of Frontline Rituximab-Containing Chemo-immunotherapy in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Does Not Predict Futility of Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2014
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The poor prognosis for patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who relapse within 1 year of initial diagnosis after first-line rituximab-based chemo-immunotherapy has created controversy about the role of autologous transplantation (HCT) in this setting. We compared autologous HCT outcomes for chemosensitive DLBCL patients between 2000 and 2011 in 2 cohorts based on time to relapse from diagnosis. The early rituximab failure (ERF) cohort consisted of patients with primary refractory disease or those with first relapse within 1 year of initial diagnosis. The ERF cohort was compared with those relapsing >1 year after initial diagnosis (late rituximab failure [LRF] cohort). ERF and LRF cohorts included 300 and 216 patients, respectively. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM), progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) of ERF versus LRF cohorts at 3 years were 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6% to 13%) versus 9% (95% CI, 5% to 13%), 47% (95% CI, 41% to 52%) versus 39% (95% CI, 33% to 46%), 44% (95% CI, 38% to 50%) versus 52% (95% CI, 45% to 59%), and 50% (95% CI, 44% to 56%) versus 67% (95% CI, 60% to 74%), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ERF was not associated with higher NRM (relative risk [RR], 1.31; P = .34). The ERF cohort had a higher risk of treatment failure (progression/relapse or death) (RR, 2.08; P < .001) and overall mortality (RR, 3.75; P <.001) within the first 9 months after autologous HCT. Beyond this period, PFS and OS were not significantly different between the ERF and LRF cohorts. Autologous HCT provides durable disease control to a sizeable subset of DLBCL despite ERF (3-year PFS, 44%) and remains the standard-of-care in chemosensitive DLBCL regardless of the timing of disease relapse.
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Older patients with myeloma derive similar benefit from autologous transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for plasma cell myeloma is performed less often in people >70 years old than in people ?70 years old. We analyzed 11,430 AHCT recipients for plasma cell myeloma prospectively reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 2008 and 2011, representing the majority of US AHCT activity during this period. Survival (OS) was compared in 3 cohorts: ages 18 to 59 years (n = 5818), 60 to 69 years (n = 4666), and >70 years (n = 946). Median OS was not reached for any cohort. In multivariate analysis, increasing age was associated with mortality (P = .0006). Myeloma-specific mortality was similar among cohorts at 12%, indicating an age-related effect on nonmyeloma mortality. Analyses were performed in a representative subgroup comparing relapse rate, progression-free survival (PFS), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). One-year NRM was 0% for age >70 years and 2% for other ages (P = not significant). The three-year relapse rate was 56% in age 18 to 59 years, 61% in age 60 to 69 years, and 63% age >70 (P = not significant). Three-year PFS was similar at 42% in age 18 to 59 years, 38% in age 60 to 69 years, and 33% in age >70 years (P = not significant). Postrelapse survival was significantly worse for the older cohort (P = .03). Older subjects selected for AHCT derived similar antimyeloma benefit without worse NRM, relapse rate, or PFS.
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Autologous transplant for relapsed follicular lymphoma: impact of pre-transplant rituximab sensitivity.
Leuk. Lymphoma
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2014
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Patients with rituximab-refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) have limited options. Before the rituximab era, autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) was shown to improve outcomes in chemotherapy-sensitive, relapsed FL, but the impact of rituximab-sensitivity on these results is unknown. We analyzed 194 consecutive relapsed patients with FL who underwent ASCT at out center and categorized them as rituximab-sensitive (RS, n = 35), rituximab-refractory (RR, n = 65) or no rituximab (NoR, n = 94) if transplanted before rituximab was used. Progression-free survival at 3 years was 85% in RS and 35% in RR patients (p = 0.0004). Only rituximab-sensitivity was significant on multivariate analysis with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.24, p = 0.01) and progression-free survival (PFS) (HR 0.35, p = 0.006) in RS patients and increased relapse in RR patients (HR 2.11, p = 0.01). Pre-transplant rituximab-sensitivity is a strong independent predictor of post-transplant outcomes in relapsed FL, although one-third of RR patients achieved a PFS of over 3 years with ASCT.
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Outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for diffuse large B cell lymphoma transformed from follicular lymphoma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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There are limited data on the outcomes of autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in diffuse large B cell lymphoma transformed from follicular lymphoma. We analyzed transplantation outcomes in 141 subjects with biopsy-proven diffuse large B-cell lymphoma transformed from follicular lymphoma reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1990 and 2009. Two groups were identified: autologous HCT (auto-HCT; n = 108) and allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT; n = 33). Fewer auto-HCTs were done for transformed follicular lymphoma in 2003 to 2009, with a shift favoring allo-HCT. Auto-HCT was associated with a 1-year nonrelapse mortality (NRM) of 8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4% to 14%), 5-year progression-free survival of 35% (95% CI, 26% to 45%), and 5-year overall survival of 50% (95% CI, 40% to 59%). In contrast, allo-HCT was associated with a 1-year NRM of 41% (95% CI, 23% to 58%), 5-year progression-free survival of 18% (95% CI, 6% to 35%), and 5-year overall survival of 22% (95% CI, 8% to 41%). Auto-HCT for transformed follicular lymphoma achieves sustained remission in a high proportion of subjects. The high NRM of allo-HCT offset any benefit that might be associated with this transplantation modality.
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Allotransplantation for patients age ?40 years with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: encouraging progression-free survival.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) disproportionately affects older patients, who do not often undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We analyzed Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data on 1248 patients age ?40 years receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning HCT for aggressive (n = 668) or indolent (n = 580) NHL. Aggressive lymphoma was more frequent in the oldest cohort 49% for age 40 to 54 versus 57% for age 55 to 64 versus 67% for age ?65; P = .0008). Fewer patients aged ?65 had previous autografting (26% versus 24% versus 9%; P = .002). Rates of relapse, acute and chronic GVHD, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year post-HCT were similar in the 3 age cohorts (22% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19% to 26%] for age 40 to 54, 27% [95% CI, 23% to 31%] for age 55 to 64, and 34% [95% CI, 24% to 44%] for age ?65. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years was slightly lower in the older cohorts (OS: 54% [95% CI, 50% to 58%] for age 40 to 54; 40% [95% CI, 36% to 44%] for age 55 to 64, and 39% [95% CI, 28% to 50%] for age ?65; P < .0001). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant effect of age on the incidence of acute or chronic GVHD or relapse. Age ?55 years, Karnofsky Performance Status <80, and HLA mismatch adversely affected NRM, PFS, and OS. Disease status at HCT, but not histological subtype, was associated with worse NRM, relapse, PFS, and OS. Even for patients age ?55 years, OS still approached 40% at 3 years, suggesting that HCT affects long-term remission and remains underused in qualified older patients with NHL.
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Autologous or Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Chemotherapy-Sensitive Mantle-Cell Lymphoma: Analysis of Transplantation Timing and Modality.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2013
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To examine the outcomes of patients with chemotherapy-sensitive mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL) following a first hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HCT), comparing outcomes with autologous (auto) versus reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic (RIC allo) HCT and with transplantation applied at different times in the disease course.
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Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Comorbidity Index is predictive of survival after Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
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Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) but is associated with morbidity and non-relapse mortality (NRM). Hematopoietic cell transplant comorbidity index (HCT-CI) was shown to predict risk of NRM and survival after allogeneic transplantation. We tested the utility of HCT-CI as a predictor of NRM and survival in patients with MM undergoing AHCT.
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Specific features identify patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma benefitting from autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2013
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Outcomes with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto HCT) for relapsed and/or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) are typically poor. We hypothesized that certain factors could predict which patients experience a favorable outcome with this approach. We thus developed a predictive score from a cohort of 67 such patients using 3 factors independently associated with progression-free survival (PFS): (1) simplified Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index score before auto HCT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.9; P = .002); (2) B symptoms at diagnosis (HR, 2.7; P = .005); and (3) remission quotient, calculated by dividing the time, in months, from diagnosis to auto HCT by the number of prior treatments (HR, 1.4; P = .02). The estimated 5-year PFS for favorable-risk patients (n = 23) and unfavorable-risk patients (n = 44) were 58% (95% confidence interval [CI], 34% to 75%) and 15% (95% CI, 6% to 28%), respectively. These factors also independently predicted overall survival. In summary, we have defined 3 simple factors that can identify patients with relapsed/refractory MCL who derive a durable benefit from salvage auto HCT.
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Prevention of dimethylsulfoxide-related nausea and vomiting by prophylactic administration of ondansetron for patients receiving autologous cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cells.
Oncol Nurs Forum
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2013
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To evaluate the effectiveness of ondansetron for the prevention of nausea and vomiting from dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) during autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) infusion.
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Autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma with secondary CNS involvement.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2013
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Pre-existing central nervous system (CNS) involvement may influence referral for autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The outcomes of 151 adult patients with NHL with prior secondary CNS involvement (CNS(+) ) receiving an AHCT were compared to 4688 patients without prior CNS lymphoma (CNS(-) ). There were significant baseline differences between the cohorts. CNS(+) patients were more likely to be younger, have lower performance scores, higher age-adjusted international prognostic index scores, more advanced disease stage at diagnosis, more aggressive histology, more sites of extranodal disease, and a shorter interval between diagnosis and AHCT. However, no statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups by analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. A matched pair comparison of the CNS(+) group with a subset of CNS(-) patients matched on propensity score also showed no differences in outcomes. Patients with active CNS lymphoma at the time of AHCT (n = 55) had a higher relapse rate and diminished PFS and OS compared with patients whose CNS lymphoma was in remission (n = 96) at the time of AHCT. CNS(+) patients can achieve excellent long-term outcomes with AHCT. Active CNS lymphoma at transplant confers a worse prognosis.
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Salvage second hematopoietic cell transplantation in myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2013
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Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) as initial therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) improves survival. However, data to support this approach for relapsed/progressive disease after initial AHCT (AHCT1) are limited. Using Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data, we report the outcomes of 187 patients who underwent a second AHCT (AHCT2) for the treatment of relapsed/progressive MM. Planned tandem AHCT was excluded. Median age at AHCT2 was 59 years (range, 28 to 72), and median patient follow-up was 47 months (range, 3 to 97). Nonrelapse mortality after AHCT2 was 2% at 1 year and 4% at 3 years. Median interval from AHCT1 to relapse/progression was 18 months, and median interval between transplantations was 32 months. After AHCT2, the incidence of relapse/progression at 1 and 3 years was 51% and 82%, respectively. At 3 years after AHCT2, progression-free survival was 13%, and overall survival was 46%. In multivariate analyses, those relapsing ?36 months after AHCT1 had superior progression-free (P = .045) and overall survival (P = .019). Patients who underwent AHCT2 after 2004 had superior survival (P = .026). AHCT2 is safe and feasible for disease progression after AHCT1. In this retrospective study, individuals relapsing ?36 months from AHCT1 derived greater benefit from AHCT2 compared with those with a shorter disease-free interval. Storage of an adequate graft before AHCT1 will ensure that the option of a second autologous transplantation is retained for patients with relapsed/progressive MM.
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The role of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Hodgkin lymphoma.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2011
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Patients with Hodgkin lymphoma are usually cured by primary therapy using chemotherapy alone or combined modality therapy with external beam radiation. Patients who do not experience a complete remission or those who experience relapse may by salvaged by high-dose therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Success of this approach is largely dependent on the tumor being sensitive to salvage chemotherapy before transplant. More studies are showing the predictive value of functional imaging in this setting. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has greater risk of nonrelapse mortality and is generally reserved for patients who experience relapse post-ASCT, but may provide long-term survival for some patients through graft-versus-tumor immune effects.
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Mantle cell lymphoma international prognostic index but not pretransplantation induction regimen predicts survival for patients with mantle-cell lymphoma receiving high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2011
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High-dose therapy (HDT) and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) are frequently used in an attempt to improve outcome in patients with mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL); however, the importance of intensive induction regimens before transplantation is unknown.
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Effect of obesity on outcomes after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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Obesity has implications for chemotherapy dosing and selection of patients for therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AutoHCT) improves outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma, but optimal chemotherapy dosing for obese patients is poorly defined. We analyzed the outcomes of 1087 recipients of AutoHCT for myeloma reported to the CIBMTR between 1995 and 2003 who received high-dose melphalan conditioning, with or without total body irradiation (TBI). We categorized patients by body mass index (BMI) as normal, overweight, obese, or severely obese. There was no overall effect of BMI on progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), progression, or nonrelapse mortality (NRM). In patients receiving melphalan and TBI conditioning, obese and severely obese patients had superior PFS and OS compared with normal and overweight patients, but the clinical significance of this finding is unclear. More obese patients were more likely to receive a reduced dose of melphalan, but there was no evidence that melphalan or TBI dosing variability affected PFS. Therefore, current common strategies of dosing melphalan do not impair outcomes for obese patients, and obesity should not exclude patients from consideration of autologous transplantation. Further research is necessary to optimize dosing of both chemotherapy and radiation in obese patients.
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Race and outcomes of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2009
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Blacks are twice as likely to develop and die from multiple myeloma (MM), and are less likely to receive an autologous hematopoietic-cell transplant (AHCT) for MM compared to Whites. The influence of race on outcomes of AHCT for MM is not well described. We compared the probability of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), disease progression, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) among Black (N=303) and White (N=1892) recipients of AHCT for MM, who were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2005. The Black cohort was more likely to be female, and had better Karnofsky performance scores, but lower hemoglobin and albumin levels at diagnosis. Black recipients were younger and more likely to be transplanted later in their disease course. Disease stage and treatment characteristics prior to AHCT were similar between the 2 groups. Black and White recipients had similar probabilities of 5-year OS (52% versus 47%, P=.19) and PFS (19% versus 21%, P=.64) as well as cumulative incidences of disease progression (72% versus 72%, P=.97) and NRM (9% versus 8%, P=.52). In multivariate analyses, race was not associated with any of these endpoints. Black recipients of AHCT for MM have similar outcomes compared to Whites, suggesting that the reasons underlying lower rates of AHCT in Blacks need to be studied further to ensure equal access to effective therapy.
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Busulfan in hematopoietic stem cell transplant setting.
Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2009
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This paper focuses primarily on the data published in the last decade about the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral and intravenous (i.v.) busulfan, therapeutic drug monitoring and clinical outcome in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) patients. Busulfan is commonly used in HCT as it is toxic to the marrow. Busulfan is available as oral or i.v. formulation. The most common significant toxicity of busulfan is sinusoidal obstruction syndrome. Even with the introduction of i.v. busulfan, variability in the systemic concentrations of busulfan after weight-based dosing and the association between busulfan plasma exposure and outcome in HCT patients have led to the continued use of therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan. New strategies for personalizing busulfan dosing are being studied to maximize the use of busulfan for optimal disease control with the least toxicity to HCT patients. One such strategy currently being evaluated is if busulfan clearance can be accurately predicted by genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase (GST), with the currently available data suggesting that GST polymorphisms cannot be used to personalize busulfan dosing.
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Autologous and allogeneic transplantation for burkitt lymphoma outcomes and changes in utilization: a report from the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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Trends in utilization and outcomes after autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Burkitt lymphoma were analyzed in 241 recipients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1985 and 2007. The autologous HCT cohort had a higher proportion of chemotherapy-sensitive disease, peripheral blood grafts, and HCT in first complete remission (CR1). The use of autologous HCT has declined over time, with only 19% done after 2001. Overall survival at 5 years for the autologous cohort was 83% for those in CR1 and 31% for those not in CR1. Corresponding progression-free survival (PFS) was 78% and 27%, respectively. After allogeneic HCT, overall survival at 5 years was 53% and 20% for the CR1 and non-CR1 cohorts, whereas PFS was 50% and 19%, respectively. The most common cause of death was progressive lymphoma. Allogeneic HCT performed in a higher-risk subset (per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines) resulted in a 5-year PFS of 27%. Autologous HCT resulted in a 5-year PFS of 44% in those undergoing transplantation in the second CR.
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The effective use of plerixafor as a real-time rescue strategy for patients poorly mobilizing autologous CD34(+) cells.
J Clin Apher
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Plerixafor enhances CD34(+) cell mobilization, however, its optimal use is unknown. We hypothesized that plerixafor could "rescue" patients in the midst of mobilization when factors indicated a poor CD34(+) yield. Of 295 consecutive autologous peripheral blood mobilization attempts at our center, 39 (13%) used plerixafor as rescue strategy due to a CD34(+) cell concentration <10/?l (median 5.95/?l, n = 30), low CD34(+) cell yield from prior apheresis day (median 1.06 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg, n = 7), or other (n = 2). Patients received a median of one plerixafor dose (range: 1-4). Thirty-four (87%) collected =2 × 10 (6) CD34(+) cells/kg and 26 (67%) collected =4 × 10 (6) CD34(+) cells/kg. Median collections for lymphoma (n = 24) and myeloma (n = 15) patients were 4.1 × 10(6) and 8.3 × 10(6) CD34/kg, respectively. A single dose of plerixafor was associated with an increase in the mean peripheral blood CD34(+) concentration of 17.2 cells/?l (P < 0.001) and mean increased CD34(+) cell yield following a single apheresis of 5.11 × 10(6) /kg (P < 0.03). A real-time rescue use of plerixafor is feasible and may allow targeted use of this agent. J. Clin. Apheresis, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.