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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Noninjurious mechanical ventilation activates a proinflammatory transcriptional program in the lung.
Physiol. Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving intervention in patients with respiratory failure. However, human and animal studies have demonstrated that mechanical ventilation using large tidal volumes (>or=12 ml/kg) induces a potent inflammatory response and can cause acute lung injury. We hypothesized that mechanical ventilation with a "noninjurious" tidal volume of 10 ml/kg would still activate a transcriptional program that places the lung at risk for severe injury. To identify key regulators of this transcriptional response, we integrated gene expression data obtained from whole lungs of spontaneously breathing mice and mechanically ventilated mice with computational network analysis. Topological analysis of the gene product interaction network identified Jun and Fos families of proteins as potential regulatory hubs. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay confirmed protein binding to activator protein-1 (AP-1) consensus sequences, and supershift experiments identified JunD and FosB as components of ventilation-induced AP-1 binding. Specific recruitment of JunD to the regulatory region of the F3 gene by mechanical ventilation was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel computational framework to systematically dissect transcriptional programs activated by mechanical ventilation in the lung, and show that noninjurious mechanical ventilation initiates a response that can prime the lung for injury from a subsequent insult.
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Lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury is independent of serum vitamin D concentration.
PLoS ONE
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Vitamin D deficiency is increasing in incidence around the world. Vitamin D, a fat-soluble vitamin, has documented effects on the innate and adaptive immune system, including macrophage and T regulatory (Treg) cell function. Since Treg cells are important in acute lung injury resolution, we hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency increases the severity of injury and delays injury resolution in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury. Vitamin D deficient mice were generated, using C57BL/6 mice, through diet modification and limited exposure to ultraviolet light. At 8 weeks of age, vitamin D deficient and sufficient mice received 2.5 g/kg of LPS or saline intratracheal. At 1 day, 3 days and 10 days, mice were anesthetized and lung elastance measured. Mice were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lungs and serum were collected. Ex vivo neutrophil chemotaxis was evaluated, using neutrophils from vitamin D sufficient and deficient mice exposed to the chemoattractants, KC/CXCL1 and C5a, and to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from LPS-exposed mice. We found no difference in the degree of lung injury. Leukocytes were mildly decreased in the bronchoalveolar fluid of vitamin D deficient mice at 1 day. Ex-vivo, neutrophils from vitamin D deficient mice showed impaired chemotaxis to KC but not to C5a. Vitamin D deficiency modestly impairs neutrophil chemotaxis; however, it does not affect lung injury or its resolution in an LPS model of acute lung injury.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.