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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Utility of measuring (1,3) ?-D-glucan in cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of fungal central nervous system infection.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2014
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(1-3)-?-D-glucan (BDG) from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising marker for diagnostic and prognostic aid of central nervous system (CNS) fungal infection, but its relationship to serum values has not been studied. Herein we detected BDG from CSF at levels 2-fold lower than serum in patients without evidence of fungal disease but 25-fold higher than in serum in non-cryptococcal CNS fungal infections. CSF BDG may be a useful biomarker in the evaluation of fungal CNS disease.
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AIDS-related mycoses: the way forward.
Trends Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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The contribution of fungal infections to the morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected individuals is largely unrecognized. A recent meeting highlighted several priorities that need to be urgently addressed, including improved epidemiological surveillance, increased availability of existing diagnostics and drugs, more training in the field of medical mycology, and better funding for research and provision of treatment, particularly in developing countries.
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Test performance of blood beta-glucan for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with AIDS and respiratory symptoms.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2013
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The objective of this study was to define the test characteristics of plasma beta-glucan for diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in AIDS patients with respiratory symptoms.
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Serum galactomannan and (1->3)-?-D-glucan assays for patients with multiple myeloma and Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2011
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We assessed the performance of galactomannan and (1?3)-?-d-glucan in 29 serum samples from patients with multiple myeloma and Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia without invasive fungal disease to address issues of false positivity and uninterpretable results previously reported among patients with these conditions. Galactomannan and (1?3)-?-d-glucan assays were not falsely elevated in any patient. (1?3)-?-d-glucan assay results were uninterpretable in 24% of patients. Patients with IgG levels of >2,000 mg/dl had higher odds of uninterpretable (1?3)-?-d-glucan results.
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Does ampicillin-sulbactam cause false positivity of (1,3)-beta-D-glucan assay? A prospective evaluation of 15 patients without invasive fungal infections.
Mycoses
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2011
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The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between intravenous ampicillin-sulbactam treatment and (1,3)-beta-D-glucan (BDG) assay. Fifteen patients with a median age of 60 (16-81) without known risk factors for invasive fungal infections who received a daily dose of 3×2g ampicillin-sulbactam monotherapy from different batches were included in the study. Thirteen patients had soft tissue infections. The 5 of 13 patients who went under surgery had surgical dressings. Serum samples were obtained both before and after antibiotic infusion on the first, third, seventh and tenth days of an ampicillin-sulbactam treatment course. BDG was assayed using the Fungitell kit (Associates of Cape Cod, East Falmouth, MA, USA) according to manufacturers specifications. All serum samples were also tested for galactomannan (GM) antigenemia by Platelia Aspergillus ELISA (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Marnes-la-Coquette, France). A total of 37 of 117 serum samples were positive for BDG at a threshold of 80pg ml(-1) . Seven of 37 BDG positive serum samples had a GM index ?0.5. When a cutoff value of ?0.5 was used for GM positivity, 16 (13.3%) serum samples were positive. For a cutoff value of ?0.7, eight (6.6%) serum samples were positive. There were no statistically significant differences in the median BDG levels (P=0.47) or median GM indices (P?=0.28) of the various sampling times. None of the SAM vials tested positive for BDG or GM. After ruling out fungal infections and all known potential causes of false BDG positivity, environmental contamination remained possible cause of BDG reactivity. We did not observe any significant association of ampicillin-sulbactam administration and positive assays for BDG or GM.
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Early serum (1?3)-?-D-glucan levels in patients with burn injury.
Mycoses
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2011
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Serum (1?3)-?-D-glucan (BG) is increasingly used as diagnostic marker for invasive fungal infections. Exposure to gauze may lead to false-positive BG assays. The role of BG is unclear in thermally injured patients who frequently require extensive gauze coverage; therefore, we prospectively evaluated BG levels in burn-injured patients. Serum BG levels were measured in 18 burn patients immediately before application of the first dressing and 12 h after. Patients were stratified by extent of total body surface area (TBSA) requiring gauze coverage: <20%, 20-39%, 40-60% and >60%. BG levels were obtained from patients with non-burn trauma as controls. BG results were positive (>80 pg ml?¹) in 9/18 (50%) patients at baseline and in 8/18 (44%) 12 h after application of the first dressing. BG levels were positive in 1/5 (20%) of patients with <20% TBSA requiring gauze and in 10/13 (77%) with ? 20% (P < 0.05). None of the control patients had positive BG at any time point and none of the patients had candidemia at baseline. Mean serum BG levels decreased (19.44 pg ml?¹) after gauze placement. False-positive serum BG elevations are common in this patient population. Positivity correlates with extent of TBSA injured, but is not impacted by the gauze itself.
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Prospective survey of (1?3)-beta-D-glucan and its relationship to invasive candidiasis in the surgical intensive care unit setting.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2010
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Non-culture-based diagnostic strategies are needed for diagnosing invasive candidiasis (IC). We evaluated serial serum (1?3)-?-d-glucan (BG) levels in patients in the surgical trauma intensive care unit (SICU) patients with clinical evidence of IC. Serum samples from patients admitted to the SICU for a minimum of 3 days were collected twice weekly and analyzed for BG by using a Fungitell kit with a positive cutoff of ? 80 pg/ml. Diagnosis of IC was done using a set of predefined and validated clinical practice-based criteria. A total of 57 patients consented to participate and were enrolled. The median ICU stay was 16 days (range, 3 to 51). A total of 14 of 57 (25%) false positives were observed in the first sample (ICU day 3) and, overall, 73% of the day 3 samples had higher BG levels than subsequent samples. On the date of clinical diagnosis of IC, the sensitivity of a positive BG for identifying invasive candidiasis was 87%, with a 73% specificity. In patients with evidence of IC, the median BG value was significantly higher than those without evidence of IC (171 versus 48 pg/ml, P = 0.02), respectively. In the three patients with proven IC, BG was detected 4 to 8 days prior to diagnosis. BG serum detection may be a useful tool to aid in the early diagnosis of IC in SICU patients, particularly after day 3 and in patients with at least two positive samples drawn several days apart. Elevated BG levels within the first 3 days need to be further characterized.
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Pneumocystis jirovecii infection: Cell wall (1→3)-β-D-glucan biology and diagnostic utility.
Crit. Rev. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2010
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Pneumocystis jirovecii has emerged as an important pulmonary pathogen. Historically associated with the immunocompromised, it is being increasingly observed in immunocompetent populations. (1?3)-ß-D-glucan (BG) is a major component of the cyst cell wall and plays an important role in the inflammatory response to the organism. Inflammatory synergy by co-stimulation with BG and Toll-like receptor ligands has been demonstrated in vitro and may be a factor in the pathophysiology of Pneumocystis pneumonia. Detection of highly elevated serum concentrations of BG in the serum of patients has been shown to be highly sensitive for the presence of pulmonary P. jirovecii.
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The absence of Candida albicans in milk samples of women with clinical symptoms of ductal candidiasis.
Breastfeed Med
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2009
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The objective of this prospective study was to determine if Candida albicans is present in the milk of women suffering from symptoms of severe nipple and deep breast pain.
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Serum (1?3)-?-D-glucan levels in HIV-infected individuals are associated with immunosuppression, inflammation, and cardiopulmonary function.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
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Translocation of gastrointestinal bacteria in HIV-infected individuals is associated with systemic inflammation, HIV progression, mortality, and comorbidities. HIV-infected individuals are also susceptible to fungal infection and colonization, but whether fungal translocation occurs and influences HIV progression or comorbidities is unknown.
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Serum (1->3)-?-D-glucan measurement in coccidioidomycosis.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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The serum (1?3)-?-d-glucan assay has emerged as an important diagnostic test for invasive fungal disease. The utility of this assay in coccidioidomycosis has not been previously studied. Using a cutoff value of ?80 pg/ml, we found the sensitivity (43.9%), specificity (91.1%), positive predictive value (81.8%), and negative predictive value (64.1%) to be similar to those of the assay in diagnosing other invasive mycoses.
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Correlation of clinical outcomes with ?-glucan levels in patients with invasive candidiasis.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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The correlation of ?-glucan (BG) levels with clinical outcomes in invasive candidiasis (IC) remains unknown. Patients with proven IC were followed prospectively from diagnosis to outcome with twice-weekly serum BG sampling. Correlation of BG with clinical outcome was assessed in each patient. BG levels tend to decrease in successfully treated patients and increase in treatment failures. BG levels may be useful as surrogates for outcome evaluation of IC.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.