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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
TGF-? and opioid receptor signaling crosstalk results in improvement of endogenous and exogenous opioid analgesia under pathological pain conditions.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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Transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) protects against neuroinflammatory events underlying neuropathic pain. TGF-? signaling enhancement is a phenotypic characteristic of mice lacking the TGF-? pseudoreceptor BAMBI (BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor), which leads to an increased synaptic release of opioid peptides and to a naloxone-reversible hypoalgesic/antiallodynic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the following: (1) the effects of BAMBI deficiency on opioid receptor expression, functional efficacy, and analgesic responses to endogenous and exogenous opioids; and (2) the involvement of the opioid system in the antiallodynic effect of TGF-?1. BAMBI-KO mice were subjected to neuropathic pain by sciatic nerve crash injury (SNI). Gene (PCR) and protein (Western blot) expressions of ?- and ?-opioid receptors were determined in the spinal cord. The inhibitory effects of agonists on the adenylyl cyclase pathway were investigated. Two weeks after SNI, wild-type mice developed mechanical allodynia and the functionality of ?-opioid receptors was reduced. By this time, BAMBI-KO mice were protected against allodynia and exhibited increased expression and function of opioid receptors. Four weeks after SNI, when mice of both genotypes had developed neuropathic pain, the analgesic responses induced by morphine and RB101 (an inhibitor of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, which increases the synaptic levels of enkephalins) were enhanced in BAMBI-KO mice. Similar results were obtained in the formalin-induced chemical-inflammatory pain model. Subcutaneous TGF-?1 infusion prevented pain development after SNI. The antiallodynic effect of TGF-?1 was naloxone-sensitive. In conclusion, modulation of the endogenous opioid system by TGF-? signaling improves the analgesic effectiveness of exogenous and endogenous opioids under pathological pain conditions.
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Circulating levels of miR-133a predict the regression potential of left ventricular hypertrophy after valve replacement surgery in patients with aortic stenosis.
J Am Heart Assoc
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2013
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Myocardial microRNA-133a (miR-133a) is directly related to reverse remodeling after pressure overload release in aortic stenosis patients. Herein, we assessed the significance of plasma miR-133a as an accessible biomarker with prognostic value in predicting the reversibility potential of LV hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients.
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Transforming growth factor-? in normal nociceptive processing and pathological pain models.
Mol. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2011
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The transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) superfamily is a multifunctional, contextually acting family of cytokines that participate in the regulation of development, disease and tissue repair in the nervous system. The TGF-? family is composed of several members, including TGF-?s, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and activins. In this review, we discuss recent findings that suggest TGF-? function as important pleiotropic modulators of nociceptive processing both physiologically and under pathological painful conditions. The strategy of increasing TGF-? signaling by deleting "BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor" (BAMBI), a TGF-? pseudoreceptor, has demonstrated the inhibitory role of TGF-? signaling pathways in normal nociception and in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. In particular, strong evidence suggests that TGF-?1 is a relevant mediator of nociception and has protective effects against the development of chronic neuropathic pain by inhibiting the neuroimmune responses of neurons and glia and promoting the expression of endogenous opioids within the spinal cord. In the peripheral nervous system, activins and BMPs function as target-derived differentiation factors that determine and maintain the phenotypic identity and circuit assembly of peptidergic nociceptors. In this context, activin is involved in the complex events of neuroinflammation that modulate the expression of pain during wound healing. These findings have provided new insights into the physiopathology of nociception. Moreover, specific members of the TGF-? family and their signaling effectors and modulator molecules may be promising molecular targets for novel therapeutic agents for pain management.
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Myocardial gene expression of microRNA-133a and myosin heavy and light chains, in conjunction with clinical parameters, predict regression of left ventricular hypertrophy after valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis.
Heart
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2011
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Left ventricular (LV) reverse remodelling after valve replacement in aortic stenosis (AS) has been classically linked to the hydraulic performance of the replacement device, but myocardial status at the time of surgery has received little attention.
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Chronic treatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone favours the coupling of spinal cord ?-opioid receptors to G?z protein subunits.
Neuropharmacology
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Sustained administration of opioid antagonists to rodents results in an enhanced antinociceptive response to agonists. We investigated the changes in spinal ?-opioid receptor signalling underlying this phenomenon. Rats received naltrexone (120 ?g/h; 7 days) via osmotic minipumps. The antinociceptive response to the ?-agonist sufentanil was tested 24 h after naltrexone withdrawal. In spinal cord samples, we determined the interaction of ?-receptors with G? proteins (agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTP?S binding and immunoprecipitation of [(35)S]GTP?S-labelled G? subunits) as well as ?-opioid receptor-dependent inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Chronic naltrexone treatment augmented DAMGO-stimulated [(35)S]GTP?S binding, potentiated the inhibitory effect of DAMGO on the AC/cAMP pathway, and increased the inverse agonist effect of naltrexone on cAMP accumulation. In control rats, the inhibitory effect of DAMGO on cAMP production was antagonized by pertussis toxin (PTX) whereas, after chronic naltrexone, the effect became resistant to the toxin, suggesting a coupling of ?-receptors to PTX-insensitive G?(z) subunits. Immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the transduction switch from G?(i/o) to G?(z) proteins. The consequence was an enhancement of the antinociceptive response to sufentanil that, in consonance with the neurochemical data, was prevented by G?(z)-antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides but not by PTX. Such changes in opioid receptor signalling can be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, they may have potential applicability to the optimisation of the analgesic effects of opioid drugs for the control of pain. On the other hand, they represent an important homeostatic dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system that might account for undesirable effects in patients chronically treated with opioid antagonists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
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BAMBI (bone morphogenetic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor) reveals the involvement of the transforming growth factor-beta family in pain modulation.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2010
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Transforming growth factors-beta (TGF-betas) signal through type I and type II serine-threonine kinase receptor complexes. During ligand binding, type II receptors recruit and phosphorylate type I receptors, triggering downstream signaling. BAMBI [bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and activin membrane-bound inhibitor] is a transmembrane pseudoreceptor structurally similar to type I receptors but lacks the intracellular kinase domain. BAMBI modulates negatively pan-TGF-beta family signaling; therefore, it can be used as an instrument for unraveling the roles of these cytokines in the adult CNS. BAMBI is expressed in regions of the CNS involved in pain transmission and modulation. The lack of BAMBI in mutant mice resulted in increased levels of TGF-beta signaling activity, which was associated with attenuation of acute pain behaviors, regardless of the modality of the stimuli (thermal, mechanical, chemical/inflammatory). The nociceptive hyposensitivity exhibited by BAMBI(-/-) mice was reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Moreover, in a model of chronic neuropathic pain, the allodynic responses of BAMBI(-/-) mice also appeared attenuated through a mechanism involving delta-opioid receptor signaling. Basal mRNA and protein levels of precursor proteins of the endogenous opioid peptides proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and proenkephalin (PENK) appeared increased in the spinal cords of BAMBI(-/-). Transcript levels of TGF-betas and their intracellular effectors correlated directly with genes encoding opioid peptides, whereas BAMBI correlated inversely. Furthermore, incubation of spinal cord explants with activin A or BMP-7 increased POMC and/or PENK mRNA levels. Our findings identify TGF-beta family members as modulators of acute and chronic pain perception through the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding the endogenous opioids.
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Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 reflect left ventricular remodeling in aortic stenosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2009
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TGF-beta1 is involved in cardiac remodeling through an auto/paracrine mechanism. The contribution of TGF-beta1 from plasmatic source to pressure overload myocardial remodeling has not been analyzed. We investigated, in patients with valvular aortic stenosis (AS), and in mice subjected to transverse aortic arch constriction (TAC), whether plasma TGF-beta1 relates with myocardial remodeling, reflected by LV transcriptional adaptations of genes linked to myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis, and by heart morphology and function.
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Gender differences of echocardiographic and gene expression patterns in human pressure overload left ventricular hypertrophy.
J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2009
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Gender influence on left ventricular (LV) remodeling associated to aortic valve stenosis (AS) has been long recognized, but underlying myocardial gene expression patterns have not been explored. We studied whether sex differences in echocardiographic LV anatomy and function in AS patients are associated with specific changes in myocardial mRNA expression of remodeling proteins. AS (n=39) and control (n=23)patients were assessed echocardiographically, and LV myocardial mRNA levels were quantified by PCR. AS patients exhibit increased wall thicknesses and LV mass index (LVMI), but only men show chamber dilation.Collagens and fibronectin mRNA levels increased correlatively to transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). In AS women, collagen I upregulation was proportionally higher than other extracellular matrix (ECM)components. No changes in matrix metalloproteinase-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 were detected. Gene expressions of sarcomeric proteins (beta-myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain-2) and TGF-beta1 were directly correlated with each other. Myosin light chain-2 mRNA levels increased proportionally to the transvalvular gradient, but women did so in a greater extent than men for a given gradient. In women, the hypertrophic growth response, reflected by LVMI, was proportional to the expression of genes encoding sarcomeric proteins and TGF-beta1. In men, chamber dilation and deterioration of LVEF was proportional to collagens, fibronectin, and TGF-beta1 gene expression levels. We evidenced gender biased gene expression patterns of the intracellular TGF-beta pathways involving the Smad branch, but not the TAK-1 branch, that could contribute to the remodeling differences observed in AS men and women. Based on these findings, a gender specific therapeutic approach of pressure overload LV hypertrophy could be justified.
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BAMBI (BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor) protects the murine heart from pressure-overload biomechanical stress by restraining TGF-? signaling.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
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Left ventricular (LV) pressure overload is a major cause of heart failure. Transforming growth factors-? (TGF-?s) promote LV remodeling under biomechanical stress. BAMBI (BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor) is a pseudoreceptor that negatively modulates TGF-? signaling. The present study tests the hypothesis that BAMBI plays a protective role during the adverse LV remodeling under pressure overload. The subjects of the study were BAMBI knockout mice (BAMBI(-/-)) undergoing transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). We examined LV gene and protein expression of remodeling-related elements, histological fibrosis, and heart morphology and function. LV expression of BAMBI was increased in AS patients and TAC-mice and correlated directly with TGF-?. BAMBI deletion led to a gain of myocardial TGF-? signaling through canonical (Smads) and non-canonical (TAK1-p38 and TAK1-JNK) pathways. As a consequence, the remodeling response to pressure overload in BAMBI(-/-) mice was exacerbated in terms of hypertrophy, chamber dilation, deterioration of long-axis LV systolic function and diastolic dysfunction. Functional remodeling associated transcriptional activation of fibrosis-related TGF-? targets, up-regulation of the profibrotic micro-RNA-21, histological fibrosis and increased metalloproteinase-2 activity. Histological remodeling in BAMBI(-/-) mice involved TGF-?s. BAMBI deletion in primary cardiac fibroblasts exacerbated TGF-?-induced profibrotic responses while BAMBI overexpression in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts attenuated them. Our findings identify BAMBI as a critical negative modulator of myocardial remodeling under pressure overload. We suggest that BAMBI is involved in negative feedback loops that restrain the TGF-? remodeling signals to protect the pressure-overloaded myocardium from uncontrolled extracellular matrix deposition in humans and mice.
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Myocardial and circulating levels of microRNA-21 reflect left ventricular fibrosis in aortic stenosis patients.
Int. J. Cardiol.
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Various human cardiovascular pathophysiological conditions associate aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and circulating miRNAs are emerging as promising biomarkers. In mice, myocardial miR-21 overexpression is related to cardiac fibrosis elicited by pressure overload. This study was designed to determine the role of myocardial and plasmatic miR-21 in the maladaptive remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by pressure overload in aortic stenosis (AS) patients and the clinical value of miR-21 as a biomarker for pathological myocardial fibrosis.
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Androgens contribute to sex differences in myocardial remodeling under pressure overload by a mechanism involving TGF-?.
PLoS ONE
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In clinical studies, myocardial remodeling in aortic valve stenosis appears to be more favorable in women than in men, even after menopause. In the present study, we assessed whether circulating androgens contribute to a less favorable myocardial remodeling under pressure overload in males. We examined sex-related differences in one-year-old male and female mice. Whereas male mice at this age exhibited circulating androgen levels within the normal range for young adults, the circulating estrogens in females were reduced. The contribution of gonadal androgens to cardiac remodeling was analyzed in a group of same-age castrated mice.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.