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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Laparoscopic management of obstructed gastric conduit after minimally invasive esophagectomy.
Ann. Thorac. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2014
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We describe a novel, minimally invasive method of managing an obstructed gastric conduit after minimally invasive esophagectomy. In addition, we briefly review the management of obstructed gastric conduit in patients status-post minimally invasive esophagectomy. On literature review, it was noted that gastrojejunostomy after esophagectomy was exceptionally rare. Only one other reported case of gastrojejunostomy after esophagectomy was found in the literature. This is the first reported case to our knowledge of laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy after minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE). Laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy after minimally invasive esophagectomy for obstructed gastric conduit is technically feasible, and it effectively managed the obstruction in our patient.
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Transgastric large-organ extraction: the initial human experience.
Surg Endosc
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In laparoscopy, it often is the case that port sites are enlarged for specimen extraction. This leads to higher risk of trocar site complications, such as infection or incisional hernia. Natural orifice surgery (NOTES) is beneficial for minimizing these complications, and this is emphasized when the extracted specimen is of large volume. We have been using transgastric technique for appendectomy, cholecystectomy, and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Of these transgastric operations, we focus on the one with relatively large-organ extraction: LSG with transoral remnant extraction (TORE). We describe the details and feasibility of this procedure and compare the outcomes to conventional LSG.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.