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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Extrasynaptic glutamate release through cystine/glutamate antiporter contributes to ischemic damage.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2014
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During brain ischemia, an excessive release of glutamate triggers neuronal death through the overactivation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs); however, the underlying pathways that alter glutamate homeostasis and whether synaptic or extrasynaptic sites are responsible for excess glutamate remain controversial. Here, we monitored ischemia-gated currents in pyramidal cortical neurons in brain slices from rodents in response to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as a real-time glutamate sensor to identify the source of glutamate release and determined the extent of neuronal damage. Blockade of excitatory amino acid transporters or vesicular glutamate release did not inhibit ischemia-gated currents or neuronal damage after OGD. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of the cystine/glutamate antiporter dramatically attenuated ischemia-gated currents and cell death after OGD. Compared with control animals, mice lacking a functional cystine/glutamate antiporter exhibited reduced anoxic depolarization and neuronal death in response to OGD. Furthermore, glutamate released by the cystine/glutamate antiporter activated extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDARs, and blockade of extrasynaptic NMDARs reduced ischemia-gated currents and cell damage after OGD. Finally, PET imaging showed increased cystine/glutamate antiporter function in ischemic rats. Altogether, these data suggest that cystine/glutamate antiporter function is increased in ischemia, contributing to elevated extracellular glutamate concentration, overactivation of extrasynaptic NMDARs, and ischemic neuronal death.
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Mosses as an integrating tool for monitoring PAH atmospheric deposition: Comparison with total deposition and evaluation of bioconcentration factors. A year-long case-study.
Chemosphere
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) atmospheric deposition was evaluated at a remote site in Northern Spain using moss biomonitoring with Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) Schimp., and by measuring the total deposition fluxes of PAHs. The year-long study allowed seasonal variations of PAH content in mosses to be observed, and these followed a similar trend to those of PAH fluxes in total deposition. Generally, atmospheric deposition of PAHs is greater in winter than in summer, due to more PAH emissions from domestic heating, less photoreactivity of the compounds, and intense leaching of the atmosphere by wet deposition. However, fractionation of these molecules between the environmental compartments occurs: PAH fluxes in total deposition and PAH concentrations in mosses are correlated with their solubility (r=0.852, p<0.01) and lipophilic properties (KOW, r=0.768, p<0.01), respectively. This annual study therefore showed that atmospheric PAH fluxes can be estimated with moss biomonitoring data if the bioconcentration or 'enriching' factors are known.
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Differential neuroprotective effects of 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA) is an endogenous compound produced through the metabolism of polyamines. The therapeutic potential of MTA has been assayed mainly in liver diseases and, more recently, in animal models of multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the neuroprotective effect of this molecule in vitro and to assess whether MTA can cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in order to also analyze its potential neuroprotective efficacy in vivo.
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P2X4 receptors control the fate and survival of activated microglia.
Glia
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, responds to brain disarrangements by becoming activated to contend with brain damage. Here we show that the expression of P2X4 receptors is upregulated in inflammatory foci and in activated microglia in the spinal cord of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as well as in the optic nerve of multiple sclerosis patients. To study the role of P2X4 receptors in microgliosis, we activated microglia with LPS in vitro and in vivo. We observed that P2X4 receptor activity in vitro was increased in LPS-activated microglia as assessed by patch-clamp recordings. In addition, P2X4 receptor blockade significantly reduced microglial membrane ruffling, TNF? secretion and morphological changes, as well as LPS-induced microglial cell death. Accordingly, neuroinflammation provoked by LPS injection in vivo induced a rapid microglial loss in the spinal cord that was totally prevented or potentiated by P2X4 receptor blockade or facilitation, respectively. Within the brain, microglia in the hippocampal dentate gyrus showed particular vulnerability to LPS-induced neuroinflammation. Thus, microglia processes in this region retracted as early as 2 h after injection of LPS and died around 24 h later, two features which were prevented by blocking P2X4 receptors. Together, these data suggest that P2X4 receptors contribute to controlling the fate of activated microglia and its survival.GLIA 2014;62:171-184.
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Neurotransmitter signaling in the pathophysiology of microglia.
Front Cell Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Microglial cells are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system. In the resting state, microglia are highly dynamic and control the environment by rapidly extending and retracting motile processes. Microglia are closely associated with astrocytes and neurons, particularly at the synapses, and more recent data indicate that neurotransmission plays a role in regulating the morphology and function of surveying/resting microglia, as they are endowed with receptors for most known neurotransmitters. In particular, microglia express receptors for ATP and glutamate, which regulate microglial motility. After local damage, the release of ATP induces microgliosis and activated microglial cells migrate to the site of injury, proliferate, and phagocytose cells, and cellular compartments. However, excessive activation of microglia could contribute to the progression of chronic neurodegenerative diseases, though the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Microglia have the capacity to release a large number of substances that can be detrimental to the surrounding neurons, including glutamate, ATP, and reactive oxygen species. However, how altered neurotransmission following acute insults or chronic neurodegenerative conditions modulates microglial functions is still poorly understood. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the role of neurotransmitter receptors in microglial physiology and pathology.
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Increased expression of cystine/glutamate antiporter in multiple sclerosis.
J Neuroinflammation
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2011
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Glutamate excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendrocyte and tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). Intriguingly, glutamate level in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients is elevated, a feature which may be related to the pathophysiology of this disease. In addition to glutamate transporters, levels of extracellular glutamate are controlled by cystine/glutamate antiporter x(c)?, an exchanger that provides intracellular cystine for production of glutathione, the major cellular antioxidant. The objective of this study was to analyze the role of the system x(c)? in glutamate homeostasis alterations in MS pathology.
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Gain-of-function of P2X7 receptor gene variants in multiple sclerosis.
Cell Calcium
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2011
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We have previously shown that P2X7 receptor blockade prevents ATP excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes and ameliorates chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Here, we have explored the putative association of functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms of the P2X7 receptor gene with multiple sclerosis. We found that T allele of rs17525809 polymorphism, which yields an Ala-76 to Val change in the extracellular domain, is more frequent in multiple sclerosis patients than in controls. Importantly, P2X7 variants with Val show a gain-of-function consisting in higher calcium permeability, larger electrophysiological responses and higher ethidium uptake, and enhance the effect of the also gain-of-function His-155 to Tyr substitution (rs208294) in the haplotype formed by these two variants. These findings may contribute to define the genetic background predisposing for multiple sclerosis and its pathophysiology.
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Dual-specific phosphatase-6 (Dusp6) and ERK mediate AMPA receptor-induced oligodendrocyte death.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2011
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Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are highly vulnerable to glutamate excitotoxicity, a mechanism involved in tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Thus, understanding oligodendrocyte death at the molecular level is important to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease. Here, using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR, we observed that dual-specific phosphatase-6 (Dusp6), an extracellular regulated kinase-specific phosphatase, is up-regulated in oligodendrocyte cultures as well as in optic nerves after AMPA receptor activation. In turn, Dusp6 is overexpressed in optic nerves from multiple sclerosis patients before the appearance of evident damage in this structure. We further analyzed the role of Dusp6 and ERK signaling in excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and observed that AMPA receptor activation induces a rapid increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blocking Dusp6 expression, which enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation, significantly diminished AMPA receptor-induced oligodendrocyte death. In contrast, MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition with UO126 significantly potentiates excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and increases cytochrome c release, mitochondrial depolarization, and mitochondrial calcium overload produced by AMPA receptor stimulation. Upstream analysis demonstrated that MAPK/ERK signaling alters AMPA receptor properties. Indeed, Dusp6 overexpression as well as incubation with UO126 produced an increase in AMPA receptor-induced inward currents and cytosolic calcium overload. Together, these data suggest that levels of phosphorylated ERK, controlled by Dusp6 phosphatase, regulate glutamate receptor permeability and oligodendroglial excitotoxicity. Therefore, targeting Dusp6 may be a useful strategy to prevent oligodendrocyte death in multiple sclerosis and other diseases involving CNS white matter.
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Amyloid beta oligomers induce Ca2+ dysregulation and neuronal death through activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors.
Cell Calcium
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers accumulate in brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients and are related to pathogenesis. The precise mechanisms by which Abeta oligomers cause neurotoxicity remain unresolved. In this study, we investigated the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors on the intracellular Ca2+ overload caused by Abeta. Using rat cortical neurons in culture and entorhinal-hippocampal organotypic slices, we found that Abeta oligomers significantly induced inward currents, intracellular Ca2+ increases and apoptotic cell death through a mechanism requiring NMDA and AMPA receptor activation. The massive entry of Ca2+ through NMDA and AMPA receptors induced by Abeta oligomers caused mitochondrial dysfunction as indicated by mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, oxidative stress and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Importantly, chronic treatment with nanomolar concentration of Abeta oligomers also induced NMDA- and AMPA receptor-dependent cell death in entorhinal cortex and hippocampal slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that overactivation of NMDA and AMPA receptor, mitochondrial Ca2+ overload and mitochondrial damage underlie the neurotoxicity induced by Abeta oligomers. Hence, drugs that modulate these events can prevent from Abeta damage to neurons in Alzheimers disease.
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Zn2+ -induced ERK activation mediates PARP-1-dependent ischemic-reoxygenation damage to oligodendrocytes.
Glia
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Much of the cell death following episodes of anoxia and ischemia in the mammalian central nervous system has been attributed to extracellular accumulation of glutamate and ATP, which causes a rise in [Ca(2+)](i), loss of mitochondrial potential, and cell death. However, restoration of blood flow and reoxygenation are frequently associated with exacerbation of tissue injury (the oxygen paradox). Herein we describe a novel signaling pathway that is activated during ischemia-like conditions (oxygen and glucose deprivation; OGD) and contributes to ischemia-induced oligodendroglial cell death. OGD induced a retarded and sustained increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation after restoring glucose and O(2) (reperfusion-like conditions). Blocking the ERK1/2 pathway with the MEK inhibitor UO126 largely protected oligodendrocytes against ischemic insults. ERK1/2 activation was blocked by the high-affinity Zn(2+) chelator TPEN, but not by antagonists of AMPA/kainate or P2X7 receptors that were previously shown to be involved in ischemic oligodendroglial cell death. Using a high-affinity Zn(2+) probe, we showed that ischemia induced an intracellular Zn(2+) rise in oligodendrocytes, and that incubation with TPEN prevented mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation after ischemia. Accordingly, exposure to TPEN and the antioxidant Trolox reduced ischemia-induced oligodendrocyte death. Moreover, UO126 blocked the ischemia-induced increase in poly-[ADP]-ribosylation of proteins, and the poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) inhibitor DPQ significantly inhibited ischemia-induced oligodendroglial cell death-demonstrating that PARP-1 was required downstream in the Zn(2+)-ERK oligodendrocyte cell death pathway. Chelation of cytosolic Zn(2+), blocking ERK signaling, and antioxidants may be beneficial for treating CNS white matter ischemia-reperfusion injury. Importantly, all the inhibitors of this pathway protected oligodendrocytes when applied after the ischemic insult.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.