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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Reef ecology. Chemically mediated behavior of recruiting corals and fishes: a tipping point that may limit reef recovery.
Science
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2014
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Coral reefs are in global decline, converting from dominance by coral to dominance by seaweed. Once seaweeds become abundant, coral recovery is suppressed unless herbivores return to remove seaweeds, and corals then recruit. Variance in the recovery of fishes and corals is not well understood. We show that juveniles of both corals and fishes are repelled by chemical cues from fished, seaweed-dominated reefs but attracted to cues from coral-dominated areas where fishing is prohibited. Chemical cues of specific seaweeds from degraded reefs repulsed recruits, and cues from specific corals that are typical of healthy reefs attracted recruits. Juveniles were present at but behaviorally avoided recruiting to degraded reefs dominated by seaweeds. For recovery, degraded reefs may need to be managed to produce cues that attract, rather than repel, recruiting corals and fishes.
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The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2014
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Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to 'barrens' when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs.
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Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae), and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa) against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.
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Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral-seaweed-herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence.
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Consumer diversity interacts with prey defenses to drive ecosystem function.
Ecology
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2013
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Prey traits linking consumer diversity to ecosystem function remain poorly understood. On tropical coral reefs, herbivores promote coral dominance by suppressing competing macroalgae, but the roles of herbivore identity and diversity, macroalgal defenses, and their interactions in affecting reef resilience and function are unclear. We studied adjacent pairs of no-take marine reserves and fished areas on reefs in Fiji and found that protected reefs supported 7-17x greater biomass, 2-3x higher species richness of herbivorous fishes, and 3-11x more live coral cover than did fished reefs. In contrast, macroalgae were 27-61x more abundant and 3-4x more species-rich on fished reefs. When we transplanted seven common macroalgae from fished reefs into reserves they were rapidly consumed, suggesting that rates of herbivory (ecosystem functioning) differed inside vs. outside reserves. We then video-recorded feeding activity on the same seven macroalgae when transplanted into reserves, and assessed the functional redundancy vs. complementarity of herbivorous fishes consuming these macroalgae. Of 29 species of larger herbivorous fishes on these reefs, only four species accounted for 97% of macroalgal consumption. Two unicornfish consumed a range of brown macroalgae, a parrotfish consumed multiple red algae, and a rabbitfish consumed a green alga, with almost no diet overlap among these groups. The two most chemically rich, allelopathic algae were each consumed by a single, but different, fish species. This striking complementarity resulted from herbivore species differing in their tolerances to macroalgal chemical and structural defenses. A model of assemblage diet breadth based on our feeding observations predicted that high browser diversity would be required for effective control of macroalgae on Fijian reefs. In support of this model, we observed strong negative relationships between herbivore diversity and macroalgal abundance and diversity across the six study reefs. Our findings indicate that the total diet breadth of the herbivore community and the probability of all macroalgae being removed from reefs by herbivores increases with increasing herbivore diversity, but that a few critical species drive this relationship. Therefore, interactions between algal defenses and herbivore tolerances create an essential role for consumer diversity in the functioning and resilience of coral reefs.
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Macroalgal terpenes function as allelopathic agents against reef corals.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2011
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During recent decades, many tropical reefs have transitioned from coral to macroalgal dominance. These community shifts increase the frequency of algal-coral interactions and may suppress coral recovery following both anthropogenic and natural disturbance. However, the extent to which macroalgae damage corals directly, the mechanisms involved, and the species specificity of algal-coral interactions remain uncertain. Here, we conducted field experiments demonstrating that numerous macroalgae directly damage corals by transfer of hydrophobic allelochemicals present on algal surfaces. These hydrophobic compounds caused bleaching, decreased photosynthesis, and occasionally death of corals in 79% of the 24 interactions assayed (three corals and eight algae). Coral damage generally was limited to sites of algal contact, but algae were unaffected by contact with corals. Artificial mimics for shading and abrasion produced no impact on corals, and effects of hydrophobic surface extracts from macroalgae paralleled effects of whole algae; both findings suggest that local effects are generated by allelochemical rather than physical mechanisms. Rankings of macroalgae from most to least allelopathic were similar across the three coral genera tested. However, corals varied markedly in susceptibility to allelopathic algae, with globally declining corals such as Acropora more strongly affected. Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from two allelopathic algae led to identification of two loliolide derivatives from the red alga Galaxaura filamentosa and two acetylated diterpenes from the green alga Chlorodesmis fastigiata as potent allelochemicals. Our results highlight a newly demonstrated but potentially widespread competitive mechanism to help explain the lack of coral recovery on many present-day reefs.
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Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.
J Mass Spectrom
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2011
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Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum, and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, a detailed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants.
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Chemical defense of the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens): variation in efficiency against different consumers and in different habitats.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2011
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Amphibian secondary metabolites are well known chemically, but their ecological functions are poorly understood--even for well-studied species. For example, the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) is a well known secretor of tetrodotoxin (TTX), with this compound hypothesized to facilitate this salamanders coexistence with a variety of aquatic consumers across the eastern United States. However, this assumption of chemical defense is primarily based on observational data with low replication against only a few predator types. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that N. viridescens is chemically defended against co-occurring fishes, invertebrates, and amphibian generalist predators and that this defense confers high survivorship when newts are transplanted into both fish-containing and fishless habitats. We found that adult eastern newts were unpalatable to predatory fishes (Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus) and a crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), but were readily consumed by bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus). The eggs and neonate larvae were also unpalatable to fish (L. macrochirus). Bioassay-guided fractionation confirmed that deterrence is chemical and that ecologically relevant concentrations of TTX would deter feeding. Despite predatory fishes rejecting eastern newts in laboratory assays, field experiments demonstrated that tethered newts suffered high rates of predation in fish-containing ponds. We suggest that this may be due to predation by amphibians (frogs) and reptiles (turtles) that co-occur with fishes rather than from fishes directly. Fishes suppress invertebrate consumers that prey on bullfrog larvae, leading to higher bullfrog densities in fish containing ponds and thus considerable consumption of newts due to bullfrog tolerance of newt chemical defenses. Amphibian chemical defenses, and consumer responses to them, may be more complex and indirect than previously appreciated.
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Effects of herbivory, nutrients, and reef protection on algal proliferation and coral growth on a tropical reef.
Oecologia
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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Maintaining coral reef resilience against increasing anthropogenic disturbance is critical for effective reef management. Resilience is partially determined by how processes, such as herbivory and nutrient supply, affect coral recovery versus macroalgal proliferation following disturbances. However, the relative effects of herbivory versus nutrient enrichment on algal proliferation remain debated. Here, we manipulated herbivory and nutrients on a coral-dominated reef protected from fishing, and on an adjacent macroalgal-dominated reef subject to fishing and riverine discharge, over 152 days. On both reefs, herbivore exclusion increased total and upright macroalgal cover by 9-46 times, upright macroalgal biomass by 23-84 times, and cyanobacteria cover by 0-27 times, but decreased cover of encrusting coralline algae by 46-100% and short turf algae by 14-39%. In contrast, nutrient enrichment had no effect on algal proliferation, but suppressed cover of total macroalgae (by 33-42%) and cyanobacteria (by 71% on the protected reef) when herbivores were excluded. Herbivore exclusion, but not nutrient enrichment, also increased sediment accumulation, suggesting a strong link between herbivory, macroalgal growth, and sediment retention. Growth rates of the corals Porites cylindrica and Acropora millepora were 30-35% greater on the protected versus fished reef, but nutrient and herbivore manipulations within a site did not affect coral growth. Cumulatively, these data suggest that herbivory rather than eutrophication plays the dominant role in mediating macroalgal proliferation, that macroalgae trap sediments that may further suppress herbivory and enhance macroalgal dominance, and that corals are relatively resistant to damage from some macroalgae but are significantly impacted by ambient reef condition.
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Herbivore preference for native vs. exotic plants: generalist herbivores from multiple continents prefer exotic plants that are evolutionarily naïve.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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Enemy release and biotic resistance are competing, but not mutually exclusive, hypotheses addressing the success or failure of non-native plants entering a new region. Enemy release predicts that exotic plants become invasive by escaping their co-adapted herbivores and by being unrecognized or unpalatable to native herbivores that have not been selected to consume them. In contrast, biotic resistance predicts that native generalist herbivores will suppress exotic plants that will not have been selected to deter these herbivores. We tested these hypotheses using five generalist herbivores from North or South America and nine confamilial pairs of native and exotic aquatic plants. Four of five herbivores showed 2.4-17.3 fold preferences for exotic over native plants. Three species of South American apple snails (Pomacea sp.) preferred North American over South American macrophytes, while a North American crayfish Procambarus spiculifer preferred South American, Asian, and Australian macrophytes over North American relatives. Apple snails have their center of diversity in South America, but a single species (Pomacea paludosa) occurs in North America. This species, with a South American lineage but a North American distribution, did not differentiate between South American and North American plants. Its preferences correlated with preferences of its South American relatives rather than with preferences of the North American crayfish, consistent with evolutionary inertia due to its South American lineage. Tests of plant traits indicated that the crayfish responded primarily to plant structure, the apple snails primarily to plant chemistry, and that plant protein concentration played no detectable role. Generalist herbivores preferred non-native plants, suggesting that intact guilds of native, generalist herbivores may provide biotic resistance to plant invasions. Past invasions may have been facilitated by removal of native herbivores, introduction of non-native herbivores (which commonly prefer native plants), or both.
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Coral reefs in crisis: reversing the biotic death spiral.
F1000 Biol Rep
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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Coral reefs are disappearing due to global warming, overfishing, ocean acidification, pollution, and interactions of these and other stresses. Ecologically informed management of fishes that facilitate corals by suppressing seaweeds may be our best bet for bringing reefs back from the brink of extinction.
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Ecology and bioprospecting.
Austral Ecol
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2010
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Bioprospecting is the exploration of biodiversity for new resources of social and commercial value. It is carried out by a wide range of established industries such as pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and agriculture as well as a wide range of comparatively new ones such as aquaculture, bioremediation, biomining, biomimetic engineering and nanotechnology. The benefits of bioprospecting have emerged from such a wide range of organisms and environments worldwide that it is not possible to predict what species or habitats will be critical to society, or industry, in the future. The benefits include an unexpected variety of products that include chemicals, genes, metabolic pathways, structures, materials and behaviours. These may provide physical blueprints or inspiration for new designs. Criticism aimed at bioprospecting has been addressed, in part, by international treaties and legal agreements aimed at stopping biopiracy and many activities are now funded by agencies that require capacity-building and economic benefits in host countries. Thus, much contemporary bioprospecting has multiple goals, including the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable management of natural resources and economic development. Ecologists are involved in three vital ways: first, applying ecological principles to the discovery of new resources. In this context, natural history becomes a vast economic database. Second, carrying out field studies, most of them demographic, to help regulate the harvest of wild species. Third, emphasizing the profound importance of millions of mostly microscopic species to the global economy.
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Ecological leads for natural product discovery: Novel sesquiterpene hydroquinones from the red macroalga Peyssonnelia sp.
Tetrahedron
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2010
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Pharmacologically-motivated marine natural product investigations have yielded a large variety of structurally unique compounds with interesting biomedical properties, but the natural roles of these molecules often remain unknown. While secondary metabolites may function as antimicrobial chemical defenses, few studies have examined this hypothesis. In the present investigation, chromatographic fractions from 69 collections of Fijian red macroalgae representing at least 43 species were evaluated for growth inhibition of three microbial pathogens and saprophytes of marine macrophytes. At least one microbe was suppressed by fraction(s) of all evaluated algae, suggesting that antimicrobial defenses are common among tropical seaweeds. From these leads, peyssonoic acids A-B (1-2), novel sesquiterpene hydroquinones, were isolated from the crustose red alga Peyssonnelia sp. At ecologically realistic concentrations, both compounds inhibited growth of Pseudoalteromonas bacteriolytica, a bacterial pathogen of marine algae, and Lindra thalassiae, a fungal pathogen of marine algae, and exhibited modest antineoplastic activity against ovarian cancer cells. The peyssonoic acids included one novel carbon skeleton and illustrated the utility of ecological studies in natural product discovery.
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Structure and biological evaluation of novel cytotoxic sterol glycosides from the marine red alga Peyssonnelia sp.
Bioorg. Med. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2010
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Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the extract from a Fijian red alga Peyssonnelia sp. led to the isolation of two novel sterol glycosides 19-O-?-d-glucopyranosyl-19-hydroxy-cholest-4-en-3-one (1) and 19-O-?-d-N-acetyl-2-aminoglucopyranosyl-19-hydroxy-cholest-4-en-3-one (2), and two known alkaloids indole-3-carboxaldehyde (3) and 3-(hydroxyacetyl)indole (4). Their structures were characterized by 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectral analysis. The sterol glycosides inhibited cancer cell growth with mean IC?? values (for 11 human cancer cell lines) of 1.63 and 1.41?M for 1 and 2, respectively. The most sensitive cancer cell lines were MDA-MB-468 (breast) and A549 (lung), with IC??s in of 0.71-0.97?M for 1 and 2. Modification of the sterol glycoside structures revealed that the ?,?-unsaturated ketone at C-3 and oxygenation at C-19 of 1 and 2 are crucial for anticancer activity, whereas the glucosidic group was not essential but contributed to enhanced activity against the most sensitive cell lines.
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Unusual antimalarial meroditerpenes from tropical red macroalgae.
Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2010
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Three antimalarial meroditerpenes have been isolated from two Fijian red macroalgae. The absolute stereochemistry of callophycolide A (1), a unique macrolide from Callophycus serratus, was determined using a combination of Moshers ester analysis, circular dichroism analysis with a dimolybdenum tetraacetate complex, and conformational analysis using NOEs. In addition, two known tocopherols, ?-tocopherylhydroquinone (4) and ?-tocopherylhydroquinone (5), were isolated from Amphiroa crassa. By oxidizing 5 to the corresponding ?-tocopherylquinone (6), antimalarial activity against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum was increased by more than 20-fold.
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Seaweed allelopathy degrades the resilience and function of coral reefs.
Commun Integr Biol
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2010
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Coral reefs are in dramatic global decline due to a host of local- and global-scale anthropogenic disturbances that suppress corals and enhance seaweeds. This decline is exacerbated, and recovery made less likely, due to over-fishing of herbivores that normally limit seaweed effects on corals. Seaweeds were known to suppress coral reproduction and recruitment, but in a recent study, we demonstrated that numerous seaweeds also directly poison corals via lipid-soluble allelochemicals transferred during contact. These allelopathic interactions may limit reef recovery once seaweeds proliferate and commonly contact remaining corals. Other recent studies suggest that seaweeds may also damage corals by enhancing coral disease or via release of water-soluble compounds that stimulate damaging microbes. For some of these mechanisms, cause versus effect is not yet clear. Here, we suggest that these different mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, may interact in context-dependent ways, but need to be assessed under ecologically realistic field conditions where flow may limit impacts of some mechanisms.
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Chemically rich seaweeds poison corals when not controlled by herbivores.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2010
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Coral reefs are in dramatic global decline, with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. It is unclear, however, whether seaweeds harm corals directly or colonize opportunistically following their decline and then suppress coral recruitment. In the Caribbean and tropical Pacific, we show that, when protected from herbivores, approximately 40 to 70% of common seaweeds cause bleaching and death of coral tissue when in direct contact. For seaweeds that harmed coral tissues, their lipid-soluble extracts also produced rapid bleaching. Coral bleaching and mortality was limited to areas of direct contact with seaweeds or their extracts. These patterns suggest that allelopathic seaweed-coral interactions can be important on reefs lacking herbivore control of seaweeds, and that these interactions involve lipid-soluble metabolites transferred via direct contact. Seaweeds were rapidly consumed when placed on a Pacific reef protected from fishing but were left intact or consumed at slower rates on an adjacent fished reef, indicating that herbivory will suppress seaweeds and lower frequency of allelopathic damage to corals if reefs retain intact food webs. With continued removal of herbivores from coral reefs, seaweeds are becoming more common. This occurrence will lead to increasing frequency of seaweed-coral contacts, increasing allelopathic suppression of remaining corals, and continuing decline of reef corals.
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Induced chemical defenses in a freshwater macrophyte suppress herbivore fitness and the growth of associated microbes.
Oecologia
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
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The freshwater macrophyte Cabomba caroliniana induces a chemical defense when attacked by either the crayfish Procambrus clarkii or the snail Pomacea canaliculata. Induction by either consumer lowers the palatability of the plant to both consumers. When offered food ad libitum, snails feeding on non-induced C. caroliniana grew 2.6-2.7 times more than those feeding on induced C. caroliniana. Because snails fed less on induced plants, this could be a behavioral effect (reduced feeding), a physiological effect of the induced metabolites on the consumer, or both. To assess these possibilities, we made artificial diets with lipid extracts of induced versus non-induced C. caroliniana and restricted control snails to consuming only as much as treatment snails consumed. Growth measured as shell diameter was significantly lower on the diet containing extract from induced, as opposed to non-induced, plants; change in snail mass was more variable and showed a similar, but non-significant, trend. Thus, snails may reduce feeding on induced plants to avoid suppression of fitness. The induced defenses also suppressed growth of co-occurring microbes that might attack the plant through herbivore-generated feeding scars. When two bacteria and three fungi isolated from C. caroliniana surfaces were cultured with the lipid extract from induced and non-induced C. caroliniana, both extracts inhibited the microbes, but the induced extract was more potent against three of the five potential pathogens. Thus, induced plant defenses can act against both direct consumers and microbes that might invade the plant indirectly through herbivore-generated wounds.
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Bioactive bromophycolides R-U from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus.
J. Nat. Prod.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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Four new bromophycolides, R-U (1-4), were isolated from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus and were identified by 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses. These compounds expand the known structural variety of diterpene-benzoate macrolides and exhibited modest cytotoxicity toward selected human cancer cell lines. Bromophycolide S (2) also showed submicromolar activity against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.
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Impact of herbivore identity on algal succession and coral growth on a Caribbean reef.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2010
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Herbivory is an important top-down force on coral reefs that regulates macroalgal abundance, mediates competitive interactions between macroalgae and corals, and provides resilience following disturbances such as hurricanes and coral bleaching. However, reductions in herbivore diversity and abundance via disease or over-fishing may harm corals directly and may indirectly increase coral susceptibility to other disturbances.
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Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry reveals surface-mediated antifungal chemical defense of a tropical seaweed.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2009
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Organism surfaces represent signaling sites for attraction of allies and defense against enemies. However, our understanding of these signals has been impeded by methodological limitations that have precluded direct fine-scale evaluation of compounds on native surfaces. Here, we asked whether natural products from the red macroalga Callophycus serratus act in surface-mediated defense against pathogenic microbes. Bromophycolides and callophycoic acids from algal extracts inhibited growth of Lindra thalassiae, a marine fungal pathogen, and represent the largest group of algal antifungal chemical defenses reported to date. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging revealed that surface-associated bromophycolides were found exclusively in association with distinct surface patches at concentrations sufficient for fungal inhibition; DESI-MS also indicated the presence of bromophycolides within internal algal tissue. This is among the first examples of natural product imaging on biological surfaces, suggesting the importance of secondary metabolites in localized ecological interactions, and illustrating the potential of DESI-MS in understanding chemically-mediated biological processes.
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Antimalarial bromophycolides J-Q from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus.
J. Org. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2009
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Bromophycolides J-Q (1-8) were isolated from extracts of the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus and identified with 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral analyses. These diterpene-benzoate macrolides represent two novel carbon skeletons and add to the 10 previously reported bromophycolides (9-18) from this alga. Among these 18 bromophycolides, several exhibited activities in the low micromolar range against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.
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Antibacterial neurymenolides from the Fijian red alga Neurymenia fraxinifolia.
Org. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2009
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Two novel alpha-pyrone macrolides, neurymenolides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the Fijian red alga Neurymenia fraxinifolia and characterized using a combination of NMR and mass spectral analyses. These molecules represent only the second example of alpha-pyrone macrolides, with 1 existing as interchanging atropisomers due to restricted rotation about the alpha-pyrone ring system. Neurymenolide A (1) displayed moderately potent activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF).
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Marine chemical ecology: chemical signals and cues structure marine populations, communities, and ecosystems.
Ann Rev Mar Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2009
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Chemical cues constitute much of the language of life in the sea. Our understanding of biotic interactions and their effects on marine ecosystems will advance more rapidly if this language is studied and understood. Here, I review how chemical cues regulate critical aspects of the behavior of marine organisms from bacteria to phytoplankton to benthic invertebrates and water column fishes. These chemically mediated interactions strongly affect population structure, community organization, and ecosystem function. Chemical cues determine foraging strategies, feeding choices, commensal associations, selection of mates and habitats, competitive interactions, and transfer of energy and nutrients within and among ecosystems. In numerous cases, the indirect effects of chemical signals on behavior have as much or more effect on community structure and function as the direct effects of consumers and pathogens. Chemical cues are critical for understanding marine systems, but their omnipresence and impact are inadequately recognized.
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Corals chemically cue mutualistic fishes to remove competing seaweeds.
Science
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Corals in the genus Acropora generate much of the structural complexity upon which coral reefs depend, but they are susceptible to damage from toxic seaweeds. Acropora nasuta minimizes this damage by chemically cuing symbiotic goby fishes (Gobiodon histrio or Paragobiodon echinocephalus) to remove the toxic seaweed Chlorodesmis fastigiata. Within minutes of seaweed contact, or contact from only seaweed chemical extract, the coral releases an odor that recruits gobies to trim the seaweed and dramatically reduce coral damage that would otherwise occur. In turn, chemically defended gobies become more toxic after consumption of this noxious alga. Mutualistic gobies and corals appear to represent a marine parallel to terrestrial ant-plants, in that the host provides shelter and food in return for protection from natural enemies.
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Seaweed allelopathy against coral: surface distribution of a seaweed secondary metabolite by imaging mass spectrometry.
J. Chem. Ecol.
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Coral reefs are in global decline, with seaweeds increasing as corals decrease. Although seaweeds inhibit coral growth, recruitment, and survivorship, the mechanism of these interactions is poorly understood. Here, we used field experiments to show that contact with four common seaweeds induces bleaching on natural colonies of Porites rus. Controls in contact with inert, plastic mimics of seaweeds did not bleach, suggesting seaweed effects resulted from allelopathy rather than shading, abrasion, or physical contact. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the hydrophobic extract from the red alga Phacelocarpus neurymenioides revealed a previously characterized antibacterial metabolite, neurymenolide A, as the main allelopathic agent. For allelopathy of lipid-soluble metabolites to be effective, the compounds would need to be deployed on algal surfaces where they could transfer to corals on contact. We used desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to visualize and quantify neurymenolide A on the surface of P. neurymenioides, and we found the molecule on all surfaces analyzed, with highest concentrations on basal portions of blades.
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Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.
Oecologia
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The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.
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Bromophycoic acids: bioactive natural products from a Fijian red alga Callophycus sp.
J. Org. Chem.
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Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from a Fijian red alga in the genus Callophycus resulted in the isolation of five new compounds of the diterpene-benzoate class. Bromophycoic acids A-E (1-5) were characterized by NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses and represent two novel carbon skeletons, one with an unusual proposed biosynthesis. These compounds display a range of activities against human tumor cell lines, malarial parasites, and bacterial pathogens including low micromolar suppression of MRSA and VREF.
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Are lower-latitude plants better defended? Palatability of freshwater macrophytes.
Ecology
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Increased herbivory at lower latitudes is hypothesized to select for more effective plant defenses. Feeding assays with seaweeds and salt marsh plants support this hypothesis, with low-latitude plants experiencing greater damage in the field and being less palatable than higher-latitude plants. We tested this hypothesis for freshwater macrophytes because they offered an independent plant lineage and habitat type for testing this general hypothesis and because the patchiness of consumer occupancy across isolated water bodies might produce local variance in herbivory that would override geographic variance and produce different results for this habitat type. When we fed eight congeneric pairs of live plants from four sites in Indiana vs. four sites in South Florida (-215 and 0 frost days/yr respectively) to three species of crayfishes and one species of snail, three of the four herbivores significantly preferred high-latitude to low-latitude plants. For two crayfishes that differed in feeding on live plants (one favoring high-latitude plants and one not), we retested feeding using foods composed of freeze-dried and finely ground plants, thus removing structural characteristics while retaining most chemical/nutritional traits. In this assay, both herbivores strongly preferred high-latitude plants, suggesting that lower-latitude plants had been selected for more deterrent chemical traits. When we collected 22 pairs of congeneric plants from 9 sites throughout Indiana vs. 13 sites in Central Florida (-215 and -95 frost days/yr respectively) and tested these in feeding assays with three crayfishes using dried, ground, and reconstituted plant material, we found a significant effect of latitude for only one of three species of herbivore. Overall, our results suggest a preference for high-latitude plants, but the strength of this relationship varied considerably across small scales of latitude that differed considerably in numbers of frost-free days. The difference in results suggests that large changes in frost frequency over small spatial scales may affect selection for plant defenses, that local variance in herbivory overrode differential selection at geographic scales, or that these possibilities interact when durations of cold weather periodically exclude herbivores from shallower habitats, producing heterogeneous selection for defenses at small spatial scales.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.