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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Distinct characteristics of e13a2 versus e14a2 BCR-ABL1 driven chronic myeloid leukemia under first-line therapy with imatinib.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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The vast majority of chronic myeloid leukemia patients express a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene mRNA encoding a 210 kDa tyrosine kinase which promotes leukemic transformation. A possible differential impact of the corresponding BCR-ABL1 transcript variants e13a2 ("b2a2") and e14a2 ("b3a2") on disease phenotype and outcome is still a subject of debate. A total of 1105 newly diagnosed imatinib-treated patients were analyzed according to transcript type at diagnosis (e13a2, n=451; e14a2, n=496; e13a2+e14a2, n=158). No differences regarding age, sex, or Euro risk score were observed. A significant difference was found between e13a2 and e14a2 when comparing white blood cells (88 vs. 65 × 10(9)/L, respectively; P<0.001) and platelets (296 vs. 430 × 10(9)/L, respectively; P<0.001) at diagnosis, indicating a distinct disease phenotype. No significant difference was observed regarding other hematologic features, including spleen size and hematologic adverse events, during imatinib-based therapies. Cumulative molecular response was inferior in e13a2 patients (P=0.002 for major molecular response; P<0.001 for MR4). No difference was observed with regard to cytogenetic response and overall survival. In conclusion, e13a2 and e14a2 chronic myeloid leukemia seem to represent distinct biological entities. However, clinical outcome under imatinib treatment was comparable and no risk prediction can be made according to e13a2 versus e14a2 BCR-ABL1 transcript type at diagnosis. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:00055874).
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Equivalence of BCR-ABL transcript levels with complete cytogenetic remission in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase.
J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2014
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Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients are monitored by both cytogenetic and molecular assessments, although present guidelines appear to switch from cytogenetic to molecular criteria. Due to the increasing use of molecular measurements, it was the aim of this work to identify a BCR-ABL level according to the international scale (BCR-ABL(IS)) as an equivalent substitute for complete cytogenetic remission (CCyR).
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Explaining survival differences between two consecutive studies with allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.
J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2014
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In the two consecutive German studies III and IIIA on chronic myeloid leukemia, between 1995 and 2004, 781 patients were randomized to receive either allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with a related donor or continued drug treatment. Despite comparable transplantation protocols and most centers participating in both studies, the post-transplant survival probabilities for patients transplanted in first chronic phase were significantly higher in study IIIA (144 patients) than in study III (113 patients). Prior to the decision on a combined analysis of both studies, reasons for this discrepancy had to be investigated.
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The impact of health care settings on survival time of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2014
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With the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients has migrated extensively to municipal hospitals (MHs) and office-based physicians (OBPs). Thus, we wanted to check whether the health care setting has an impact on outcome. Based on 1491 patients of the German CML Study IV, we compared the outcomes of patients from teaching hospitals (THs) with those from MHs and OBPs. Adjusting for age, European Treatment and Outcome Study (EUTOS) score, Karnofsky performance status, year of diagnosis, and experience with CML, a significant survival advantage for TH patients (hazard ratio: 0.632 respectively 0.609) was found. In particular, when treated in THs, patients with blast crisis showed a superior outcome (2-year survival rate: 47.7% vs 22.3% vs 25.0%). Because the impact of the health care setting on the outcome of CML patients has not been reported before, these findings need confirmation by other study groups. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00055874.
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Comprehensive mutational profiling in advanced systemic mastocytosis.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2013
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To explore mechanisms contributing to the clinical heterogeneity of systemic mastocytosis (SM) and to suboptimal responses to diverse therapies, we analyzed 39 KIT D816V mutated patients with indolent SM (n = 10), smoldering SM (n = 2), SM with associated clonal hematologic nonmast cell lineage disorder (SM-AHNMD, n = 5), and aggressive SM (n = 15) or mast cell leukemia (n = 7) with (n = 18) or without (n = 4) AHNMD for additional molecular aberrations. We applied next-generation sequencing to investigate ASXL1, CBL, IDH1/2, JAK2, KRAS, MLL-PTD, NPM1, NRAS, TP53, SRSF2, SF3B1, SETBP1, U2AF1 at mutational hotspot regions, and analyzed complete coding regions of EZH2, ETV6, RUNX1, and TET2. We identified additional molecular aberrations in 24/27 (89%) patients with advanced SM (SM-AHNMD, 5/5; aggressive SM/mast cell leukemia, 19/22) whereas only 3/12 (25%) indolent SM/smoldering SM patients carried one additional mutation each (U2AF1, SETBP1, CBL) (P < .001). Most frequently affected genes were TET2, SRSF2, ASXL1, CBL, and RUNX1. In advanced SM, 21/27 patients (78%) carried ?3 mutations, and 11/27 patients (41%) exhibited ?5 mutations. Overall survival was significantly shorter in patients with additional aberrations as compared to those with KIT D816V only (P = .019). We conclude that biology and prognosis in SM are related to the pattern of mutated genes that are acquired during disease evolution.
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Younger patients with chronic myeloid leukemia do well in spite of poor prognostic indicators: results from the randomized CML study IV.
Ann. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2013
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Since the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the impact of age on outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients has changed. We therefore analyzed patients from the randomized CML study IV to investigate disease manifestations and outcome in different age groups. One thousand five hundred twenty-four patients with BCR-ABL-positive chronic phase CML were divided into four age groups: (1) 16-29 years, n?=?120; (2) 30-44 years, n?=?383; (3) 45-59 years, n?=?495; and (4)??60 years, n?=?526. Group 1 (adolescents and young adults (AYAs)) presented with more aggressive disease features (larger spleen size, more frequent symptoms of organomegaly, higher white blood count, higher percentage of peripheral blasts and lower hemoglobin levels) than the other age groups. In addition, a higher rate of patients with BCR-ABL transcript levels >10 % on the international scale (IS) at 3 months was observed. After a median observation time of 67.5 months, no inferior survival and no differences in cytogenetic and molecular remissions or progression rates were observed. We conclude that AYAs show more aggressive features and poor prognostic indicators possibly indicating differences in disease biology. This, however, does not affect outcome.
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Prediction of post-remission survival in acute myeloid leukaemia: a post-hoc analysis of the AML96 trial.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2011
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The optimum post-remission treatment (PRT) in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is still a matter of debate. Consolidation treatments include chemotherapy with high-dose cytarabine, or allogeneic or autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In a post-hoc analysis of the AML96 trial (NCT00180115), our aim was to differentiate groups of patients according to the treatments that would provide them optimum benefit.
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Impact of additional cytogenetic aberrations at diagnosis on prognosis of CML: long-term observation of 1151 patients from the randomized CML Study IV.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2011
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The prognostic relevance of additional cytogenetic findings at diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unclear. The impact of additional cytogenetic findings at diagnosis on time to complete cytogenetic (CCR) and major molecular remission (MMR) and progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was analyzed using data from 1151 Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML patients randomized to the German CML Study IV. At diagnosis, 1003 of 1151 patients (87%) had standard t(9;22)(q34;q11) only, 69 patients (6.0%) had variant t(v;22), and 79 (6.9%) additional cytogenetic aberrations (ACAs). Of these, 38 patients (3.3%) lacked the Y chromosome (-Y) and 41 patients (3.6%) had ACAs except -Y; 16 of these (1.4%) were major route (second Philadelphia [Ph] chromosome, trisomy 8, isochromosome 17q, or trisomy 19) and 25 minor route (all other) ACAs. After a median observation time of 5.3 years for patients with t(9;22), t(v;22), -Y, minor- and major-route ACAs, the 5-year PFS was 90%, 81%, 88%, 96%, and 50%, and the 5-year OS was 92%, 87%, 91%, 96%, and 53%, respectively. In patients with major-route ACAs, the times to CCR and MMR were longer and PFS and OS were shorter (P < .001) than in patients with standard t(9;22). We conclude that major-route ACAs at diagnosis are associated with a negative impact on survival and signify progression to the accelerated phase and blast crisis.
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Predicting complete cytogenetic response and subsequent progression-free survival in 2060 patients with CML on imatinib treatment: the EUTOS score.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2011
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The outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been profoundly changed by the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors into therapy, but the prognosis of patients with CML is still evaluated using prognostic scores developed in the chemotherapy and interferon era. The present work describes a new prognostic score that is superior to the Sokal and Euro scores both in its prognostic ability and in its simplicity. The predictive power of the score was developed and tested on a group of patients selected from a registry of 2060 patients enrolled in studies of first-line treatment with imatinib-based regimes. The EUTOS score using the percentage of basophils and spleen size best discriminated between high-risk and low-risk groups of patients, with a positive predictive value of not reaching a CCgR of 34%. Five-year progression-free survival was significantly better in the low- than in the high-risk group (90% vs 82%, P = .006). These results were confirmed in the validation sample. The score can be used to identify CML patients with significantly lower probabilities of responding to therapy and survival, thus alerting physicians to those patients who require closer observation and early intervention.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo SCT) for chronic myeloid leukemia in the imatinib era: evaluation of its impact within a subgroup of the randomized German CML Study IV.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2009
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The role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia is being reevaluated. Whereas drug treatment has been shown to be superior in first-line treatment, data on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo SCT) as second-line therapy after imatinib failure are scarce. Using an interim safety analysis of the randomized German CML Study IV designed to optimize imatinib therapy by combination, dose escalation, and transplantation, we here report on 84 patients who underwent consecutive transplantation according to predefined criteria (low European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation [EBMT] score, imatinib failure, and advanced disease). Three-year survival after transplantation of 56 patients in chronic phase was 91% (median follow-up: 30 months). Transplantation-related mortality was 8%. In a matched pair comparison of patients who received a transplant and those who did not, survival was not different. Three-year survival after transplantation of 28 patients in advanced phase was 59%. Eighty-eight percent of patients who received a transplant achieved complete molecular remissions. We conclude that allo SCT could become the preferred second-line option after imatinib failure for suitable patients with a donor. The study is registered at the National Institutes of Health, http://clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00055874.
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A co-operative evaluation of different methods of detecting BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on second-line dasatinib or nilotinib therapy after failure of imatinib.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2009
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Various techniques have been employed to detect BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia who are resistant to imatinib. This has led to different reported frequencies of mutations and the finding of a heterogeneous pattern of individual mutations.
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The quantitative level of T315I mutated BCR-ABL predicts for major molecular response to second-line nilotinib or dasatinib treatment in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.
Haematologica
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The BCR-ABL T315I mutation causes resistance to imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. Forty BCR-ABL positive patients with imatinib resistance were analyzed for T315I mutated clones after six months on nilotinib or dasatinib treatment by quantitative allele-specific ligation polymerase chain reaction with a sensitivity of 0.05%. Ligation polymerase chain reaction revealed 10 patients with more than 10(-5) BCR-ABL(T315I%)/GUS (high levels), none of whom achieved major molecular response after 12 months, and a further 8 patients with 10(-5) or below BCR-ABL(T315I%)/GUS (low levels) who all achieved major molecular response (P<0.001). A second independent group showed molecular response in one of 12 patients with high levels and 5 of 8 patients with low levels (P=0.018). Combining the groups resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 92.9% and 87.5%, respectively. We conclude that the quantitative level of mutant T315I allele is predictive of major molecular response at 12 months on second-line nilotinib or dasatinib treatment. www.clinicaltrials.gov: CT00109707, NCT00384228, CA180013, CA180005 CA180006.
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Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): different treatment strategies versus a common standard arm--combined prospective analysis by the German AML Intergroup.
J. Clin. Oncol.
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Identifying true therapeutic progress in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requires a comparison of treatment strategies and results on the basis of uniform patient selection. To foster comparability across five clinical studies, we introduced a common standard arm combined with a general upfront randomization and performed prospective analyses with adjustment for differences in prognostic baseline characteristics.
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Clinical trials in chronic myeloid leukemia.
Curr Hematol Malig Rep
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The introduction of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has substantially improved the outcome of CML patients. Despite the positive results, problems and questions remained. This was the rationale to setup trials for treatment optimization, where imatinib was administered in higher dose and/or in combination with other therapy but where also new and potentially more efficacious second-generation TKI, nilotinib and dasatinib, were investigated. This review summarizes data of recently published first-line studies with the standard treatment imatinib 400 mg as one study arm. Results of randomized comparisons to higher-dose imatinib treatment, nilotinib or dasatinib are discussed. With regard to outcome interpretation, general aspects on statistical issues and endpoint definitions are put into focus. Considering decidedly increased longevity thanks to TKI treatment, future research should include the evaluation of the quality of life (QoL). Relating also to QoL, safe ways of drug discontinuation need to be investigated.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.