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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
TRIF signaling drives homeostatic intestinal epithelial antimicrobial peptide expression.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2014
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Recent results indicate a significant contribution of innate immune signaling to maintain mucosal homeostasis, but the precise underlying signal transduction pathways are ill-defined. By comparative analysis of intestinal epithelial cells isolated from conventionally raised and germ-free mice, as well as animals deficient in the adaptor molecules MyD88 and TRIF, the TLR3 and TLR4, as well as the type I and III IFN receptors, we demonstrate significant TLR-mediated signaling under homeostatic conditions. Surprisingly, homeostatic expression of Reg3? and Paneth cell enteric antimicrobial peptides critically relied on TRIF and, in part, TLR3 but was independent of IFN receptor signaling. Reduced antimicrobial peptide expression was associated with significantly lower numbers of Paneth cells and a reduced Paneth cell maturation and differentiation factor expression in TRIF mutant compared with wild-type epithelium. This phenotype was not transferred to TRIF-sufficient germ-free animals during cohousing. Low antimicrobial peptide expression in TRIF-deficient mice caused reduced immediate killing of orally administered bacteria but was not associated with significant alterations in the overall composition of the enteric microbiota. The phenotype was rapidly restored in a TRIF-independent fashion after transient epithelial damage. Our results identify TRIF signaling as a truly homeostatic pathway to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function revealing fundamental differences in the innate immune signaling between mucosal homeostasis and tissue repair.
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CD133-targeted Gene Transfer Into Long-term Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2014
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Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as entry receptor, transfers genes preferentially into cells with high engraftment capability. Transduction of unstimulated CD34(+) cells with CD133-LV resulted in gene marking of cells with competitive proliferative advantage in vitro and in immunodeficient mice. The CD133-LV-transduced population contained significantly more cells with repopulating capacity than cells transduced with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-LV, a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Upon transfer of a barcode library, CD133-LV-transduced cells sustained gene marking in vivo for a prolonged period of time with a 6.7-fold higher recovery of barcodes compared to transduced control cells. Moreover, CD133-LV-transduced cells were capable of repopulating secondary recipients. Lastly, we show that this targeting strategy can be used for transfer of a therapeutic gene into CD34(+) cells obtained from patients suffering of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. In conclusion, direct gene transfer into CD133(+) cells allows for sustained long-term engraftment of gene corrected cells.Molecular Therapy (2014); doi:10.1038/mt.2014.173.
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Sustained Engraftment of Cryopreserved Human Bone Marrow CD34(+) Cells in Young Adult NSG Mice.
Biores Open Access
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2014
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Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by their ability to repopulate the bone marrow of myeloablative conditioned and/or (lethally) irradiated recipients. To study the repopulating potential of human HSCs, murine models have been developed that rely on the use of immunodeficient mice that allow engraftment of human cells. The NSG xenograft model has emerged as the current standard for this purpose allowing for engraftment and study of human T cells. Here, we describe adaptations to the original NSG xenograft model that can be readily implemented. These adaptations encompass use of adult mice instead of newborns and a short ex vivo culture. This protocol results in robust and reproducible high levels of lympho-myeloid engraftment. Immunization of recipient mice with relevant antigen resulted in specific antibody formation, showing that both T cells and B cells were functional. In addition, bone marrow cells from primary recipients exhibited repopulating ability following transplantation into secondary recipients. Similar results were obtained with cryopreserved human bone marrow samples, thus circumventing the need for fresh cells and allowing the use of patient derived bio-bank samples. Our findings have implications for use of this model in fundamental stem cell research, immunological studies in vivo and preclinical evaluations for HSC transplantation, expansion, and genetic modification.
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Somatic mutations found in the healthy blood compartment of a 115-yr-old woman demonstrate oligoclonal hematopoiesis.
Genome Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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The somatic mutation burden in healthy white blood cells (WBCs) is not well known. Based on deep whole-genome sequencing, we estimate that approximately 450 somatic mutations accumulated in the nonrepetitive genome within the healthy blood compartment of a 115-yr-old woman. The detected mutations appear to have been harmless passenger mutations: They were enriched in noncoding, AT-rich regions that are not evolutionarily conserved, and they were depleted for genomic elements where mutations might have favorable or adverse effects on cellular fitness, such as regions with actively transcribed genes. The distribution of variant allele frequencies of these mutations suggests that the majority of the peripheral white blood cells were offspring of two related hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) clones. Moreover, telomere lengths of the WBCs were significantly shorter than telomere lengths from other tissues. Together, this suggests that the finite lifespan of HSCs, rather than somatic mutation effects, may lead to hematopoietic clonal evolution at extreme ages.
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Hepatic lentiviral gene transfer is associated with clonal selection, but not with tumor formation in serially transplanted rodents.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2013
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Lentiviral (LV) vectors are promising tools for long-term genetic correction of hereditary diseases. In hematopoietic stem cell gene therapies adverse events in patients due to vector integration-associated genotoxicity have been observed. Only a few studies have explored the potential risks of LV gene therapy targeting the liver. To analyze hepatic genotoxicity in vivo, we transferred the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene by LV vectors into FAH((-/-)) mice (n = 97) and performed serial hepatocyte transplantations (four generations). The integration profile (4,349 mapped insertions) of the LV vectors was assessed by ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction and deep sequencing. We tested whether the polyclonality of vector insertions was maintained in serially transplanted mice, linked the integration sites to global hepatocyte gene expression, and investigated the effects of LV liver gene therapy on the survival of the animals. The lifespan of in vivo gene-corrected mice was increased compared to 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC) control animals and unchanged in serially transplanted animals. The integration profile (4,349 mapped insertions) remained polyclonal through all mouse generations with only mild clonal expansion. Genes close to the integration sites of expanding clones may be associated with enhanced hepatocyte proliferation capacity. Conclusion: We did not find evidence for vector-induced tumors. LV hepatic gene therapy showed a favorable risk profile for stable and long-term therapeutic gene expression. Polyclonality of hepatocyte regeneration was maintained even in an environment of enforced proliferation.
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Evaluating a ligation-mediated PCR and pyrosequencing method for the detection of clonal contribution in polyclonal retrovirally transduced samples.
Hum Gene Ther Methods
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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Retroviral gene transfer has proven therapeutic potential in clinical gene therapy trials but may also cause abnormal cell growth via perturbation of gene expression in the locus surrounding the insertion site. By establishing clonal marks, retroviral insertions are also used to describe the regenerative potential of individual cells. Deep sequencing approaches have become the method of choice to study insertion profiles in preclinical models and clinical trials. We used a protocol combining ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) and pyrosequencing for insertion profiling and quantification in cells of various tissues transduced with various retroviral vectors. The presented method allows simultaneous analysis of a multitude of DNA-barcoded samples per pyrosequencing run, thereby allowing cost-effective insertion screening in studies with multiple samples. In addition, we investigated whether the number of pyrosequencing reads can be used to quantify clonal abundance. By comparing pyrosequencing reads against site-specific quantitative PCR and by performing spike-in experiments, we show that considerable variation exists in the quantification of insertion sites even when present in the same clone. Our results suggest that the protocol used here and similar approaches might misinterpret abundance clones defined by insertion sites, unless careful calibration measures are taken. The crucial variables causing this variation need to be defined and methodological improvements are required to establish pyrosequencing reads as a quantification measure in polyclonal situations.
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Multipotent stromal cells induce human regulatory T cells through a novel pathway involving skewing of monocytes toward anti-inflammatory macrophages.
Stem Cells
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Multipotent stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to possess immunomodulatory capacities and are therefore explored as a novel cellular therapy. One of the mechanisms through which MSC modulate immune responses is by the promotion of regulatory T cell (Treg) formation. In this study, we focused on the cellular interactions and secreted factors that are essential in this process. Using an in vitro culture system, we showed that culture-expanded bone marrow-derived MSC promote the generation of CD4(+) CD25(hi) FoxP3(+) T cells in human PBMC populations and that these populations are functionally suppressive. Similar results were obtained with MSC-conditioned medium, indicating that this process is dependent on soluble factors secreted by the MSC. Antibody neutralization studies showed that TGF-?1 mediates induction of Tregs. TGF-?1 is constitutively secreted by MSC, suggesting that the MSC-induced generation of Tregs by TGF-?1 was independent of the interaction between MSC and PBMC. Monocyte-depletion studies showed that monocytes are indispensable for MSC-induced Treg formation. MSC promote the survival of monocytes and induce differentiation toward macrophage type 2 cells that express CD206 and CD163 and secrete high levels of IL-10 and CCL-18, which is mediated by as yet unidentified MSC-derived soluble factors. CCL18 proved to be responsible for the observed Treg induction. These data indicate that MSC promote the generation of Tregs. Both the direct pathway through the constitutive production of TGF-?1 and the indirect novel pathway involving the differentiation of monocytes toward CCL18 producing type 2 macrophages are essential for the generation of Tregs induced by MSC.
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Insertion sites in engrafted cells cluster within a limited repertoire of genomic areas after gammaretroviral vector gene therapy.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2011
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Vector-associated side effects in clinical gene therapy have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of hematopoietic regulation in vivo. Surprisingly, many retrovirus insertion sites (RIS) present in engrafted cells have been found to cluster nonrandomly in close association with specific genes. Our data demonstrate that these genes directly influence the in vivo fate of hematopoietic cell clones. Analysis of insertions thus far has been limited to individual clinical studies. Here, we studied >7,000 insertions retrieved from various studies. More than 40% of all insertions found in engrafted gene-modified cells were clustered in the same genomic areas covering only 0.36% of the genome. Gene classification analyses displayed significant overrepresentation of genes associated with hematopoietic functions and relevance for cell growth and survival in vivo. The similarity of insertion distributions indicates that vector insertions in repopulating cells cluster in predictable patterns. Thus, insertion analyses of preclinical in vitro and murine in vivo studies as well as vector insertion repertoires in clinical trials yielded concerted results and mark a small number of interesting genomic loci and genes that warrants further investigation of the biological consequences of vector insertions.
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Correction of murine SCID-X1 by lentiviral gene therapy using a codon-optimized IL2RG gene and minimal pretransplant conditioning.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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Clinical trials have demonstrated the potential of ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to treat X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) using ?-retroviral vectors, leading to immune system functionality in the majority of treated patients without pretransplant conditioning. The success was tempered by insertional oncogenesis in a proportion of the patients. To reduce the genotoxicity risk, a self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector (LV) with improved expression of a codon optimized human interleukin-2 receptor ? gene (IL2RG) cDNA (co?c), regulated by its 1.1 kb promoter region (?cPr), was compared in efficacy to the viral spleen focus forming virus (SF) and the cellular phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoters. Pretransplant conditioning of Il2rg(-/-) mice resulted in long-term reconstitution of T and B lymphocytes, normalized natural antibody titers, humoral immune responses, ConA/IL-2 stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and polyclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangements with a clear integration preference of the SF vector for proto-oncogenes, contrary to the PGK and ?cPr vectors. We conclude that SIN lentiviral gene therapy using co?c driven by the ?cPr or PGK promoter corrects the SCID phenotype, potentially with an improved safety profile, and that low-dose conditioning proved essential for immune competence, allowing for a reduced threshold of cell numbers required.
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Avoiding cytotoxicity of transposases by dose-controlled mRNA delivery.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase and its newly developed hyperactive variant, SB100X, are of increasing interest for genome modification in experimental models and gene therapy. The potential cytotoxicity of transposases requires careful assessment, considering that residual integration events of transposase expression vectors delivered by physicochemical transfection or episomal retroviral vectors may lead to permanent transposase expression and resulting uncontrollable transposition. Comparing retrovirus-based approaches for delivery of mRNA, episomal DNA or integrating DNA, we found that conventional SB transposase, SB100X and a newly developed codon-optimized SB100Xo may trigger premitotic arrest and apoptosis. Cell stress induced by continued SB overexpression was self-limiting due to the induction of cell death, which occurred even in the absence of a co-transfected transposable element. The cytotoxic effects of SB transposase were strictly dose dependent and heralded by induction of p53 and c-Jun. Inactivating mutations in SBs catalytic domain could not abrogate cytotoxicity, suggesting a mechanism independent of DNA cleavage activity. An improved approach of retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer allowed transient and dose-controlled expression of SB100X, supported efficient transposition and prevented cytotoxicity. Transposase-mediated gene transfer can thus be tuned to maintain high efficiency in the absence of overt cell damage.
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Canonical wnt signaling regulates hematopoiesis in a dosage-dependent fashion.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2011
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Canonical Wnt signaling has been implicated in the regulation of hematopoiesis. By employing a Wnt-reporter mouse, we observed that Wnt signaling is differentially activated during hematopoiesis, suggesting an important regulatory role for specific Wnt signaling levels. To investigate whether canonical Wnt signaling regulates hematopoiesis in a dosage-dependent fashion, we analyzed the effect of different mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli gene (Apc), a negative modulator of the canonical Wnt pathway. By combining different targeted hypomorphic alleles and a conditional deletion allele of Apc, a gradient of five different Wnt signaling levels was obtained in vivo. We here show that different, lineage-specific Wnt dosages regulate hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), myeloid precursors, and T lymphoid precursors during hematopoiesis. Differential, lineage-specific optimal Wnt dosages provide a unifying concept that explains the differences reported among inducible gain-of-function approaches, leading to either HSC expansion or depletion of the HSC pool.
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Lentiviral gene transfer regenerates hematopoietic stem cells in a mouse model for Mpl-deficient aplastic anemia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Thpo/Mpl signaling plays an important role in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in addition to its role in megakaryopoiesis. Patients with inactivating mutations in Mpl develop thrombocytopenia and aplastic anemia because of progressive loss of HSCs. Yet, it is unknown whether this loss of HSCs is an irreversible process. In this study, we used the Mpl knockout (Mpl(-/-)) mouse model and expressed Mpl from newly developed lentiviral vectors specifically in the physiologic Mpl target populations, namely, HSCs and megakaryocytes. After validating lineage-specific expression in vivo using lentiviral eGFP reporter vectors, we performed bone marrow transplantation of transduced Mpl(-/-) bone marrow cells into Mpl(-/-) mice. We show that restoration of Mpl expression from transcriptionally targeted vectors prevents lethal adverse reactions of ectopic Mpl expression, replenishes the HSC pool, restores stem cell properties, and corrects platelet production. In some mice, megakaryocyte counts were atypically high, accompanied by bone neo-formation and marrow fibrosis. Gene-corrected Mpl(-/-) cells had increased long-term repopulating potential, with a marked increase in lineage(-)Sca1(+)cKit(+) cells and early progenitor populations in reconstituted mice. Transcriptome analysis of lineage(-)Sca1(+)cKit(+) cells in Mpl-corrected mice showed functional adjustment of genes involved in HSC self-renewal.
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Lentiviral vector design and imaging approaches to visualize the early stages of cellular reprogramming.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from somatic cells by gene transfer of reprogramming transcription factors. Expression levels of these factors strongly influence the overall efficacy to form iPSC colonies, but additional contribution of stochastic cell-intrinsic factors has been proposed. Here, we present engineered color-coded lentiviral vectors in which codon-optimized reprogramming factors are co-expressed by a strong retroviral promoter that is rapidly silenced in iPSC, and imaged the conversion of fibroblasts to iPSC. We combined fluorescence microscopy with long-term single cell tracking, and used live-cell imaging to analyze the emergence and composition of early iPSC clusters. Applying our engineered lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that vector silencing typically occurs prior to or simultaneously with the induction of an Oct4-EGFP pluripotency marker. Around 7 days post-transduction (pt), a subfraction of cells in clonal colonies expressed Oct4-EGFP and rapidly expanded. Cell tracking of single cell-derived iPSC colonies supported the concept that stochastic epigenetic changes are necessary for reprogramming. We also found that iPSC colonies may emerge as a genetic mosaic originating from different clusters. Improved vector design with continuous cell tracking thus creates a powerful system to explore the subtle dynamics of biological processes such as early reprogramming events.
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Polyclonal fluctuation of lentiviral vector-transduced and expanded murine hematopoietic stem cells.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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Gene therapy has proven its potential to cure diseases of the hematopoietic system. However, severe adverse events observed in clinical trials have demanded improved gene-transfer conditions. Whereas progress has been made to reduce the genotoxicity of integrating gene vectors, the role of pretransplantation cultivation is less well investigated. We observed that the STIF (stem cell factor [SCF], thrombopoietin [TPO], insulin-like growth factor-2 [IGF-2], and fibroblast growth factor-1 [FGF-1]) cytokine cocktail developed to effectively expand murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) also supports the expansion of leukemia-initiating insertional mutants caused by gammaretroviral gene transfer. We compared 4 protocols to examine the impact of prestimulation and posttransduction culture in STIF in the context of lentiviral gene transfer. Observing 56 transplanted mice for up to 9.5 months, we found consistent engraftment and gene-marking rates after prolonged ex vivo expansion. Although a lentiviral vector with a validated insertional-mutagenic potential was used, longitudinal analysis identifying > 7000 integration sites revealed polyclonal fluctuations, especially in "expanded" groups, with de novo detection of clones even at late time points. Posttransduction expansion in STIF did not enrich clones with insertions in proto-oncogenes but rather increased clonal diversity. Our data indicate that lentiviral transduction in optimized media mediates intact polyclonal hematopoiesis without selection for growth-promoting hits by posttransduction expansion.
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Leukemias induced by altered TRK-signaling are sensitive to mTOR inhibitors in preclinical models.
Ann. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2010
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Rapamycin is a potent allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor with clinical applications as an anticancer agent. However, only a fraction of cancer patients responds to the drug, and no biomarkers are available to predict tumor sensitivity. Recently, we and others have obtained evidence for potential involvement of tropomyosin-related kinase (TRK) receptor protein tyrosine kinases (TRKA, TRKB, TRKC) in leukemia. In the present study, we tested the therapeutic effect of Rapamycin and its analog RAD001 on altered TRK-induced leukemia in a murine model. Daily treatment with Rapamycin (2 mg/kg) or RAD001 (1 mg/kg) significantly prolonged the survival of treated animals (n?=?40) compared with the placebo group. Consistently, both mTOR and S6 proteins were strongly dephosphorylated in vitro and in vivo after treatment with Rapamycin or RAD001. However, Rapamycin did not completely inhibit mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. With exception of one mouse showing slight reactivation of Akt after treatment, no reactivation of MAPK or Akt pathways was observed in other resistant tumors. Interestingly, leukemic cells isolated from a Rapamycin-resistant mouse were still highly sensitive to Rapamycin in vitro. Our findings suggest that altered TRK signaling may be a good predictor of tumor sensitivity to mTOR inhibition and that pathways other than MAPK and Akt exist that may trigger resistance of leukemic cells to Rapamycin in vivo.
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The genomic risk of somatic gene therapy.
Semin. Cancer Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Gene vectors with an untargeted insertion profile have been explored in preclinical models and clinical trials for the transfer of potentially therapeutic genetic information into somatic cells that have a high replicative potential. The gene-modified cell population can be viewed as a genetic mosaic whose complexity depends upon the target cell type, the number of transduced cells, the average number of insertions per cell, the genetic stability and composition of the transgene, and the integration pattern of the vector. Selection by the environment encountered in the patient may support the preferential survival of clones with insertional deregulation of genes that are involved in the control of engraftment, proliferation or differentiation, in the worst case initiating oncogenic progression. Rapid scientific and technological progress has shed much light onto this dark side of untargeted vector integration. New approaches to unbiased and highly sensitive "integromics" promise a precise documentation of stable polyclonality, clonal fluctuation or clonal imbalance of gene-modified cell populations. Evidence has been obtained for a number of approaches to potentially reduce the genomic risk of gene therapy: targeting cells that lack sustained replicative potential, using vectors with a more neutral integration spectrum, reducing the number of vector copies per cell, designing gene expression cassettes that avoid long-distance enhancer interactions or fusion transcripts, and reducing, as far as possible, the risk of secondary mutations. The genomic risk of gene therapy can thus be prevented by the collective targeting of all contributing factors.
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Insertional transformation of hematopoietic cells by self-inactivating lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2009
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Gene transfer vectors may cause clonal imbalance and even malignant cell transformation by insertional upregulation of proto-oncogenes. Lentiviral vectors (LV) with their preferred integration in transcribed genes are considered less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors (GV) with their preference for integration next to transcriptional start sites and regulatory gene regions. Using a sensitive cell culture assay and a series of self-inactivating (SIN) vectors, we found that the lentiviral insertion pattern was approximately threefold less likely than the gammaretroviral to trigger transformation of primary hematopoietic cells. However, lentivirally induced mutants also showed robust replating, in line with the selection for common insertion sites (CIS) in the first intron of the Evi1 proto-oncogene. This potent proto-oncogene thus represents a CIS for both GV and LV, despite major differences in their integration mechanisms. Altering the vectors enhancer-promoter elements had a greater effect on safety than the retroviral insertion pattern. Clinical grade LV expressing the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein under control of its own promoter had no transforming potential. Mechanistic studies support the conclusion that enhancer-mediated gene activation is the major cause for insertional transformation of hematopoietic cells, opening rational strategies for risk prevention.
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Cell-intrinsic and vector-related properties cooperate to determine the incidence and consequences of insertional mutagenesis.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2009
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In gene therapeutic approaches targeting hematopoietic cells, insertional mutagenesis may provoke clonal dominance with potential progress to overt leukemia. To investigate the contribution of cell-intrinsic features and determine the frequency of insertional proto-oncogene activation, we sorted hematopoietic subpopulations before transduction with replication-deficient gamma-retroviral vectors and studied the clonal repertoire in transplanted C57BL/6J mice. Progressive clonal dominance only developed in the progeny of populations with intrinsic stem cell potential, where expanding clones with insertional upregulation of proto-oncogenes such as Evi1 were retrieved with a frequency of approximately 10(-4). Longitudinal studies by high-throughput sequencing and locus-specific quantitative PCR showed clones with >50-fold expansion between weeks 5 and 31 after transplantation. In contrast, insertional events in proto-oncogenes did not endow the progeny of multipotent or myeloid-restricted progenitors with the potential for clonal dominance (risk <10(-6)). Transducing sorted hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors in short-term cultures improved chimerism, and although clonal dominance developed, there was no evidence for insertional events in the vicinity of proto-oncogenes as the underlying cause. We conclude that cell-intrinsic properties cooperate with vector-related features to determine the incidence and consequences of insertional mutagenesis. Furthermore, our study offers perspectives for refinement of animal experiments in the assessment of vector-related genotoxicity.
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Stem cell marking with promotor-deprived self-inactivating retroviral vectors does not lead to induced clonal imbalance.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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Stable genetic modification of stem cells holds great promise for gene therapy and marking, but commonly used gamma-retroviral vectors were found to influence growth/survival characteristics of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by insertional mutagenesis. In this article, we show that promoter-deprived gamma-retroviral self-inactivating (pd-SIN) vectors allow stable genetic marking of serially reconstituting murine HSC. In contrast to findings with gamma-retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) vectors, serial transplantation of pd-SIN-marked HSC in a sensitive mouse model was apparently not associated with induced clonal imbalance of gene-marked HSC. Furthermore, insertions of pd-SIN into protooncogenes, growth-promoting and signaling genes occurred significantly less frequent than in control experiments with LTR vectors. Also, transcriptional dysregulation of neighboring genes potentially caused by the pd-SIN insertion was rarely seen and comparatively weak. The integration pattern of promotor-deprived SIN vectors in reconstituting HSC seems to depend on the transcriptional activity of the respective gene loci reflecting the picture described for LTR vectors. In conclusion, our data strongly support the use of SIN vectors for gene-marking studies and suggest an increased therapeutic index for vectors lacking enhancers active in HSC.
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The nuclear effector of Wnt-signaling, Tcf1, functions as a T-cell-specific tumor suppressor for development of lymphomas.
PLoS Biol.
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The HMG-box factor Tcf1 is required during T-cell development in the thymus and mediates the nuclear response to Wnt signals. Tcf1(-/-) mice have previously been characterized and show developmental blocks at the CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) to CD4+CD8+ double positive transition. Due to the blocks in T-cell development, Tcf1(-/-) mice normally have a very small thymus. Unexpectedly, a large proportion of Tcf1(-/-) mice spontaneously develop thymic lymphomas with 50% of mice developing a thymic lymphoma/leukemia at the age of 16 wk. These lymphomas are clonal, highly metastatic, and paradoxically show high Wnt signaling when crossed with Wnt reporter mice and have high expression of Wnt target genes Lef1 and Axin2. In wild-type thymocytes, Tcf1 is higher expressed than Lef1, with a predominance of Wnt inhibitory isoforms. Loss of Tcf1 as repressor of Lef1 leads to high Wnt activity and is the initiating event in lymphoma development, which is exacerbated by activating Notch1 mutations. Thus, Notch1 and loss of Tcf1 functionally act as collaborating oncogenic events. Tcf1 deficiency predisposes to the development of thymic lymphomas by ectopic up-regulation of Lef1 due to lack of Tcf1 repressive isoforms and frequently by cooperating activating mutations in Notch1. Tcf1 therefore functions as a T-cell-specific tumor suppressor gene, besides its established role as a Wnt responsive transcription factor. Thus, Tcf1 acts as a molecular switch between proliferative and repressive signals during T-lymphocyte development in the thymus.
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Comprehensive investigation of parameter choice in viral integration site analysis and its effects on the gene annotations produced.
Hum. Gene Ther.
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Introducing therapeutic genes into hematopoietic stem cells using retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer is an effective treatment for monogenic diseases. The risks of therapeutic gene integration include aberrant expression of a neighboring gene, resulting in oncogenesis at low frequencies (10(-7)-10(-6)/transduced cell). Mechanisms governing insertional mutagenesis are the subject of intensive ongoing studies that produce large amounts of sequencing data representing genomic regions flanking viral integration sites (IS). Validating and analyzing these data require automated bioinformatics applications. The exact methods used vary between applications, based on the requirements and preferences of the designer. The parameters used to analyze sequence data are capable of shaping the resulting integration site annotations, but a comprehensive examination of these effects is lacking. Here we present a web-based tool for integration site analysis, called Methods for Analyzing ViRal Integration Collections (MAVRIC), and use its highly customizable interface to look at how IS annotations can vary based on the analysis parameters. We used the integration data of the previously published adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) gene therapy trials for evaluation of MAVRIC. The output illustrates how MAVRIC allows for direct multiparameter comparison of integration patterns. Careful analysis of the SCID data and reanalyses using different parameters for trimming, alignment, and repeat masking revealed the degree of variation that can be expected to arise due to changes in these parameters. We observed mainly small differences in annotation, with the largest effects caused by masking repeat sequences and by changing the size of the window around the IS.
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Differential requirements for Wnt and Notch signaling in hematopoietic versus thymic niches.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
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All blood cells are derived from multipotent stem cells, the so-called hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), that in adults reside in the bone marrow. Most types of blood cells also develop there, with the notable exception of T lymphocytes that develop in the thymus. For both HSCs and developing T cells, interactions with the surrounding microenvironment are critical in regulating maintenance, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation. Such specialized regulatory microenvironments are referred to as niches and provide both soluble factors as well as cell-cell interactions between niche component cells and blood cells. Two pathways that are critical for early T cell development in the thymic niche are Wnt and Notch signaling. These signals also play important but controversial roles in the HSC niche. Here, we review the differences and similarities between the thymic and hematopoietic niches, with particular focus on Wnt and Notch signals, as well as the latest insights into regulation of these developmentally important pathways.
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Next-generation sequencing for minimal residual disease monitoring in acute myeloid leukemia patients with FLT3-ITD or NPM1 mutations.
Genes Chromosomes Cancer
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Systematic assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients has been hampered by lack of a reliable, uniform MRD marker applicable to all patients. We evaluated next-generation sequencing (NGS) for MRD assessment in AML patients (n = 80 samples). The ability of NGS technologies to generate thousands of clonal sequences makes it possible to determine the allelic ratio of sequence variants. Using NGS, we were able to determine the allelic ratio of different FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) clones within one patient sample, in addition to resolution of FLT3-ITD insertion site, length, and sequence in a single analysis. Furthermore, NGS allowed us to study emergence of clonal dominance. Parallel assessment of MRD by NGS and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in NPM1 mutated patients was concordant in 95% of analyzed samples (n = 38). The frequency of mutated alleles was linearly quantified by NGS. As NGS sensitivity is scalable depending on sequence coverage, it reflects a highly flexible and reliable tool to assess MRD in leukemia patients.
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Alpharetroviral self-inactivating vectors: long-term transgene expression in murine hematopoietic cells and low genotoxicity.
Mol. Ther.
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Comparative integrome analyses have highlighted alpharetroviral vectors with a relatively neutral, and thus favorable, integration spectrum. However, previous studies used alpharetroviral vectors harboring viral coding sequences and intact long-terminal repeats (LTRs). We recently developed self-inactivating (SIN) alpharetroviral vectors with an advanced split-packaging design. In a murine bone marrow (BM) transplantation model we now compared alpharetroviral, gammaretroviral, and lentiviral SIN vectors and showed that all vectors transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), leading to comparable, sustained multilineage transgene expression in primary and secondary transplanted mice. Alpharetroviral integrations were decreased near transcription start sites, CpG islands, and potential cancer genes compared with gammaretroviral, and decreased in genes compared with lentiviral integrations. Analyzing the transcriptome and intragenic integrations in engrafting cells, we observed stronger correlations between in-gene integration targeting and transcriptional activity for gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors than for alpharetroviral vectors. Importantly, the relatively "extragenic" alpharetroviral integration pattern still supported long-term transgene expression upon serial transplantation. Furthermore, sensitive genotoxicity studies revealed a decreased immortalization incidence compared with gammaretroviral and lentiviral SIN vectors. We conclude that alpharetroviral SIN vectors have a favorable integration pattern which lowers the risk of insertional mutagenesis while supporting long-term transgene expression in the progeny of transplanted HSCs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.