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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Herpes simplex encephalitis in glioma patients: a challenging diagnosis.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2014
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In recent years, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) has been reported with increasing frequency in settings of immunosuppression, such as acquired immunodeficiency, transplantation and cancer. As observed, in immunocompromised individuals HSE presents peculiar clinical and paraclinical features, and poorer prognosis.
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Lower motor neuron disease with respiratory failure caused by a novel MAPT mutation.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2014
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To investigate the molecular defect underlying a large Italian kindred with progressive adult-onset respiratory failure, proximal weakness of the upper limbs, and evidence of lower motor neuron degeneration.
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Facing contrast-enhancing gliomas: perfusion MRI in grade III and grade IV gliomas according to tumor area.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2014
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Tumoral neoangiogenesis characterizes high grade gliomas. Relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV), calculated with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) Perfusion-Weighted Imaging (PWI), allows for the estimation of vascular density over the tumor bed. The aim of the study was to characterize putative tumoral neoangiogenesis via the study of maximal rCBV with a Region of Interest (ROI) approach in three tumor areas-the contrast-enhancing area, the nonenhancing tumor, and the high perfusion area on CBV map-in patients affected by contrast-enhancing glioma (grades III and IV). Twenty-one patients were included: 15 were affected by grade IV and 6 by grade III glioma. Maximal rCBV values for each patient were averaged according to glioma grade. Although rCBV from contrast-enhancement and from nonenhancing tumor areas was higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (5.58 and 2.68; 3.01 and 2.2, resp.), the differences were not significant. Instead, rCBV recorded in the high perfusion area on CBV map, independently of tumor compartment, was significantly higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (7.51 versus 3.78, P = 0.036). In conclusion, neoangiogenesis encompasses different tumor compartments and CBV maps appear capable of best characterizing the degree of neovascularization. Facing contrast-enhancing brain tumors, areas of high perfusion on CBV maps should be considered as the reference areas to be targeted for glioma grading.
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A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies a novel locus at 17q11.2 associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2013
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Identification of mutations at familial loci for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has provided novel insights into the aetiology of this rapidly progressing fatal neurodegenerative disease. However, genome wide association studies (GWAS) of the more common (?90%) sporadic form have been less successful with the exception of the replicated locus at 9p21.2. To identify new loci associated with disease susceptibility we have established the largest association study in ALS to date and undertaken a GWAS meta-analytical study combining 3,959 newly genotyped Italian individuals (1,982 cases, 1,977 controls) collected by SLAGEN (Italian Consortium for the Genetics of ALS) together with samples from Netherlands, USA, UK, Sweden, Belgium, France, Ireland and Italy collected by ALSGEN (the International Consortium on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Genetics). We analyzed a total of 13,225 individuals, 6,100 cases and 7,125 controls for almost 7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We identified a novel locus with genome-wide significance at 17q11.2 (rs34517613 P=1.11 x 10(-8); OR 0.82) that was validated when combined with genotype data from a replication cohort (P=8.62 x 10(-9); OR 0.833) of 4,656 individuals. Furthermore, we confirmed the previously reported association at 9p21.2 (rs3849943 with P=7.69 x 10(-9); OR 1.16). Finally, we have estimated the contribution of common variation to heritability of sporadic ALS as ?12% using a linear mixed model accounting for all SNPs. Our results provide an insight into the genetic structure of sporadic ALS, confirming that common variation contributes to risk and that sufficiently powered studies can identify novel susceptibility loci.
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Acute late-onset encephalopathy after radiotherapy: an unusual life-threatening complication.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2013
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Unusual late-onset complications of brain irradiation, characterized by reversible neurologic focal signs, seizures, and MRI alterations, have recently been reported and classified as stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART)(1) and peri-ictal pseudoprogression (PIPG).(2.)
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Posttranscriptional regulation of SOD1 gene expression under oxidative stress: Potential role of ELAV proteins in sporadic ALS.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2013
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Increased levels of SOD1 mRNA have been observed in sporadic ALS patients (SALS) compared to controls. Hence, the understanding of the mechanisms by which SOD1 gene expression is modulated may shed new light on SOD1 involvement in ALS. Of interest, some adenine/uracil-rich elements (AREs) in SOD1 3-untranslated region have been identified. These sequences represent the docking sites for several RNA-binding proteins such as ELAV proteins (ELAVs), positive regulators of gene expression. We first investigated in SH-SY5Y cells whether SOD1 mRNA represents a target of ELAVs. Results from RNA Electrophoretic Mobility Shift and RNA-immunoprecipitation assays showed a molecular interaction between ELAVs and SOD1 mRNA. We also observed that the treatment with H2O2 induced a significant increase of the amount of SOD1 mRNA bound by ELAVs and an up-regulation of SOD1 protein levels. We found a specific increase in ELAV/HuR phosphorylation, suggesting activation of this protein, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from SALS patients compared to controls. Finally, we found increased levels of ELAV proteins in the motor cortex and spinal cord from SALS patients compared to controls, in parallel with SOD1 up-regulation in the same areas. This study suggests, for the first time, that ELAVs are involved in the regulation of SOD1 gene expression at post-transcriptional level and that these proteins are more activated in ALS pathology. The link between ELAVs and SOD1 may open novel perspectives for ALS research, paving the way for new therapeutic options.
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Postinfectious neurologic syndromes: a prospective cohort study.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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Postinfectious neurologic syndromes (PINSs) of the CNS include heterogeneous disorders, sometimes relapsing. In this study, we aimed to a) describe the spectrum of PINSs; b) define predictors of outcome in PINSs; and c) assess the clinical/paraclinical features that help differentiate PINSs from multiple sclerosis (MS).
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Altered intracellular localization of SOD1 in leukocytes from patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Several lines of evidence support the hypothesis of a toxic role played by wild type SOD1 (WT-SOD1) in the pathogenesis of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). In this study we investigated both distribution and expression profile of WT-SOD1 in leukocytes from 19 SALS patients and 17 healthy individuals. Immunofluorescence experiments by confocal microscopy showed that SOD1 accumulates in the nuclear compartment in a group of SALS subjects. These results were also confirmed by western blot carried out on soluble nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions, with increased nuclear SOD1 level (p<0.05). In addition, we observed the presence of cytoplasmic SOD1 aggregates in agreement with an increased amount of the protein recovered by the insoluble fraction. A further confirmation of the overall increased level of SOD1 has been obtained from single cells analysis using flow cytometry as cells from SALS patients showed an higher SOD1 protein content (p<0.05). These findings add further evidence to the hypothesis of an altered WT-SOD1 expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with ALS suggesting that WT-SOD1 species with different degrees of solubility could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.
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Prognostic value of CD109+ circulating endothelial cells in recurrent glioblastomas treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Recent data suggest that circulating endothelial and progenitor cells (CECs and CEPs, respectively) may have predictive potential in cancer patients treated with bevacizumab, the antibody recognizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here we report on CECs and CEPs investigated in 68 patients affected by recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan and two Independent Datasets of rGBM patients respectively treated with bevacizumab alone (n=32, independent dataset A: IDA) and classical antiblastic chemotherapy (n=14, independent dataset B: IDB).
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Systemic sclerosis in aquaporin-4 antibody-positive longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis.
J. Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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We report on the first patient with a relapsing, anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) antibody-positive, longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) who developed systemic sclerosis (SSc). A 62-year-old woman, who presented with bilateral, distal lower limb and perineal numbness, developed clinical manifestations and paraclinical features of SSc. Spinal cord imaging revealed lesions that were consistent with LETM. Patients serum was positive for neuromyelitis optica (NMO)-IgG/AQP-4 antibodies. High-dose intravenous corticosteroids improved the neurological symptoms. The present case expands the list of autoimmune systemic diseases that occur in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders associated with NMO-IgG/AQP-4 antibodies.
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NGF and heart: Is there a role in heart disease?
Pharmacol. Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2010
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The review emphasizes the role of NGF, the most representative member of the neurotrophins family, in cardiac physiopathology with a particular focus on healing and sprouting processes occurring after tissue damage. Cardiac and circulating NGF levels dramatically increase following myocardial injury (MI). A very early rise of this neurotrophin is indeed observed soon after MI (hours). Such a rise may lead to sympathetic nerve sprouting which may underlie the later genesis of arrhythmias but may also favor the healing process. At later times (months after), when heart failure develops, the opposite is detected and NGF tissue levels are below the normal range, an event that may in turn participate to defective innervation and cardiac failure. Through a careful analysis of preclinical and clinical studies, this review proposes that time is the key variable when studying these opposite changes in NGF expression observed following MI and attempting to interpret and correlate them with cardiac physiopathology. The examination of the results leads to the speculation that NGF modulation may be a pharmacological target for interventions in specific stages of heart dysfunction following MI.
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Cerebrospinal BAFF and Epstein-Barr virus-specific oligoclonal bands in multiple sclerosis and other inflammatory demyelinating neurological diseases.
J. Neuroimmunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2010
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We measured circulating serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of B lymphocyte activating factor of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily (BAFF), and determined total and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific oligoclonal IgG bands (OCBs) in 43 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 23 patients with other inflammatory demyelinating neurological diseases, and 20 patients with non-inflammatory neurological diseases. Serum and CSF BAFF concentrations did not differ in the three studied groups. In MS, the highest BAFF concentrations were found in the CSF samples with more than 6 OCBs (233.1 ± 129.5 vs 79.2 ± 51.6 pg/mL in the samples with less than 7 OCBs, p<0.0001). Irrespectively from BAFF levels, EBV-specific OCBs were detected in MS and in the other non-inflammatory and inflammatory demyelinating neurological diseases, with a similar frequency, and as a mirror pattern in 30 of 33 EBV-specific OCB-positive cases (p<0.0001). These results indicate that circulating CSF BAFF concentrations cannot help differentiate MS from other inflammatory demyelinating neurological diseases, but positively associates with the qualitative expression of elevated intrathecal IgG production in MS, and that the oligoclonal EBV-specific antibody response, when present, is mostly systemic in all the studied neurological patients, and not preferentially restricted to MS.
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Changes in skeletal muscle qualities during enzyme replacement therapy in late-onset type II glycogenosis: temporal and spatial pattern of mass vs. strength response.
J. Inherit. Metab. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2010
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Muscle quality is defined as muscle strength generated per unit muscle mass. If enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has some effects on type II glycogenosis (GSDII) skeletal muscle pathology, we should be able to measure a change in strength and mass. We conducted a prospective study including 11 patients aged 54.2 ± 11.2 years, referring to a single institution and receiving ERT for ?2 years. Median Walton score was 3 (2.5-6). Lower limb skeletal muscles were assessed by dynamometry and quantitative muscle MRI. Three segments (anterior thigh, posterior thigh, leg) were analysed separately. Clinical-MRI correlations were searched for at T0, T6/T8, and T18/24. Changes in lean and fat body composition were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. We found that the anterior thigh showed the best therapeutic response, with an improvement in muscle quality (muscle mass: +7.5%, p = 0.035; strength: +45%, p = 0.002). BMI and lean body mass increased (p = 0.007). Patients with low BMI showed a better outcome. Intramuscular fat accumulation significantly progressed in spite of ERT (+3.7%, p = 0.001), especially in the poorly responsive posterior thigh muscles. Both clinical assessment and MRI revealed a definite improvement in the anterior thigh muscles. However, progression of intramuscular fat accumulation during ERT, as well as the limited responsiveness of posterior thigh muscles, suggests the necessity for early treatment intervention. The better outcome of patients with low BMI, if confirmed, may indicate that dietary protocols could be adopted as adjuvant measures to ERT in adult GSDII.
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Flavin-containing monooxygenase mRNA levels are up-regulated in als brain areas in SOD1-mutant mice.
Neurotox Res
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2010
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Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are a family of microsomal enzymes involved in the oxygenation of a variety of nucleophilic heteroatom-containing xenobiotics. Recent results have pointed to a relation between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and FMO genes. ALS is an adult-onset, progressive, and fatal neurodegenerative disease. We have compared FMO mRNA expression in the control mouse strain C57BL/6J and in a SOD1-mutated (G93A) ALS mouse model. Fmo expression was examined in total brain, and in subregions including cerebellum, cerebral hemisphere, brainstem, and spinal cord of control and SOD1-mutated mice. We have also considered expression in male and female mice because FMO regulation is gender-related. Real-Time TaqMan PCR was used for FMO expression analysis. Normalization was done using hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) as a control housekeeping gene. Fmo genes, except Fmo3, were detectably expressed in the central nervous system of both control and ALS model mice. FMO expression was generally greater in the ALS mouse model than in control mice, with the highest increase in Fmo1 expression in spinal cord and brainstem. In addition, we showed greater Fmo expression in males than in female mice in the ALS model. The expression of Fmo1 mRNA correlated with Sod1 mRNA expression in pathologic brain areas. We hypothesize that alteration of FMO gene expression is a consequence of the pathological environment linked to oxidative stress related to mutated SOD1.
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G93A SOD1 alters cell cycle in a cellular model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.
Cell. Signal.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2010
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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative multifactorial disease characterized, like other diseases such as Alzheimers disease (AD), Parkinsons disease (PD) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD), by the degeneration of specific neuronal cell populations. Motor neuron loss is distinctive of ALS. However, the causes of onset and progression of motor neuron death are still largely unknown. In about 2% of all cases, mutations in the gene encoding for the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are implicated in the disease. Several alterations in the expression or activation of cell cycle proteins have been described in the neurodegenerative diseases and related to cell death. In this work we show that mutant SOD1 can alter cell cycle in a cellular model of ALS. Our findings suggest that modifications in the cell cycle progression could be due to an increased interaction between mutant G93A SOD1 and Bcl-2 through the cyclins regulator p27. As previously described in post mitotic neurons, cell cycle alterations could fatally lead to cell death.
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SOD1 mRNA expression in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2010
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The mutated Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) (E.C. No. 1.15.1.1) is generally recognized as a pathological cause of 20% of the familial form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). However, several pieces of evidence also show that wild-type SOD1, under conditions of cellular stress, is implicated in a significant fraction of sporadic ALS cases, which represent 90% of ALS patients. Herein, we describe an abnormally high level of SOD1 transcript in spinal cord, brain stem and lymphocytes of sporadic ALS patients. Protein expression studies show a similar or lower amount of SOD1 in affected brain areas and lymphocytes, respectively. No differences are found in brain regions (cerebellum and non-motor cerebral cortex) not involved in the ALS neurodegenerative processes. In this report, cell and disease specificity are shown since no mRNA SOD1 increase is observed in sporadic ALS fibroblasts or in lymphocytes of patients affected by Alzheimers disease. These findings provide new insight and understanding of the pathologic causes of sporadic forms of ALS and allow a possible explanation for the molecular involvement of wild-type SOD1.
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Severe familial ALS with a novel exon 4 mutation (L106F) in the SOD1 gene.
J. Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2010
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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with a positive familial history in 5-10% of ALS cases. Mutations in the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene have been found in 12%-23% of patients diagnosed with familial ALS. Here we report a novel mutation in exon 4 of SOD1 gene in a 55-year-old ALS patient belonging to a large Italian family with ALS first clinically described in 1968. In the family the clinical presentation was characterized by relatively early age of onset, spinal onset with proximal distribution weakness, bulbar involvement and a rapid disease course. Molecular analysis showed a heterozygous mutation at codon 106 resulting in a substitution of phenylalanine for leucine in the SOD1 protein (L106F). In analogy with the previously reported L106V mutation, we propose that the L106F causes a relevant destabilization of the protein chain around the mutation site, able to affect the SOD1 monomer and dimer structures suggesting a pathogenic role for this novel mutation.
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Time course of oxidant markers and antioxidant defenses in subgroups of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.
Neurochem. Int.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2010
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Oxidative stress markers have been found in nervous and peripheral tissues of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. Here, we evaluated the activity of some antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase in erythrocyte, the marker of non-enzymatic antioxidant response (total antioxidant status), as well as plasma reactive oxygen species, at the enrolment and during disease progression in 88 patients affected by the sporadic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our study has been performed along 72 months by grouping the patients according to the ALS functional rating score or rate of disease progression. Our results showed a significant impairment of erythrocytes glutathione peroxidase activity in all groups of patients that remained low during disease time course. SOD1 activity significantly decreased along disease course in subjects with a more impaired functional status. A decreasing activity of all assayed enzymes was found in patients who have a faster disease progression rate. By this work we have the evidence that different ALS phenotypes present with different profile of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant response.
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Doxorubicin and congo red effectiveness on prion infectivity in golden Syrian hamster.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2009
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The effect of doxorubicin and Congo Red on prion protein (PrP) infectivity in experimental scrapie was studied to better understand the effect of these compounds in prion diseases and to establish whether a dose-response correlation exists for Congo Red. This was performed in order to test the effectiveness of compounds that may easily be used in human prion diseases. Brain homogenate containing membrane bound PrPSc monomers was used as inoculum and was previously incubated with doxorubicin 10(-3) M and with increasing concentrations of Congo Red ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-2) M. This study shows for the first time that doxorubicin, and confirms that Congo Red, may interact with pathological PrP monomers modifying their infectious properties. Pre-incubation of infected brain homogenate with Congo Red resulted in prolonged incubation time and survival, independently of Congo Red concentration (p<0.05). Doxorubicin and Congo Red effects do not depend upon interaction with PrP amyloid material.
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Regulation of FMO and PON detoxication systems in ALS human tissues.
Neurotox Res
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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset, progressive, and fatal neurodegenerative disease with unknown etiology. Recent evidence suggests an association between the exposure to toxic environmental factors and sporadic ALS. The flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) and paraoxonase (PONs) genes encode enzymes involved in xenobiotic detoxication and are associated with ALS. FMO and PON gene expression has been examined in the human central nervous system including human brain subregions defined as the spinal cord, medulla, and cerebral cortex and in the peripheral tissues (lymphocytes, fibroblasts) in ALS patients and normal control subjects. FMO expression was generally higher in tissues from ALS subjects than in control tissues, with the largest increases in FMO expression detected in the spinal cord. In peripheral tissues, the FMO mRNA level was found to be lower compared with FMO expression in brain tissue, and no differences were detected between ALS patients and the control tissue. FMO and PON gene expression was low in peripheral tissues. In contrast to FMO5 expression, the PON2 gene was down-regulated in ALS patients compared to the controls. Because FMO and PON are involved in the detoxication processes and their functional activity to bioactivate chemicals to toxins has been documented, the data herein suggest that environmental toxin exposure may play a role in a subset of individuals who contract ALS by altering FMO and PON gene expression. Although the precise pathogenic link is presently unknown, these findings suggest a role at FMO and PON genes in the development of ALS.
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Screening of the PFN1 gene in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in frontotemporal dementia.
Neurobiol. Aging
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Mutations in the profilin 1 (PFN1) gene, encoding a protein regulating filamentous actin growth through its binding to monomeric G-actin, have been recently identified in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Functional studies performed on ALS-associated PFN1 mutants demonstrated aggregation propensity, alterations in growth cone, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Previous screening of PFN1 gene in sporadic ALS (SALS) cases led to the identification of the p.E117G mutation, which is likely to represent a less pathogenic variant according to both frequency data in control subjects and cases, and functional experiments. To determine the effective contribution of PFN1 mutations in SALS, we analyzed a large cohort of 1168 Italian SALS patients and also included 203 frontotemporal dementia (FTD) cases because of the great overlap between these 2 neurodegenerative diseases. We detected the p.E117G variant in 1 SALS patient and the novel synonymous change p.G15G in another patient, but none in a panel of 1512 control subjects. Our results suggest that PFN1 mutations in sporadic ALS and in FTD are rare, at least in the Italian population.
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COL4A1-related disease: raised creatine kinase and cerebral calcification as useful pointers.
Neuropediatrics
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Mutations in COL4A1 are responsible for a spectrum of clinical phenotypes characterized by neurological, ocular, and renal involvement. Neurological features are the most prominent but as such are rather nonspecific.
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C9ORF72 repeat expansion in a large Italian ALS cohort: evidence of a founder effect.
Neurobiol. Aging
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A hexanucleotide repeat expansion (RE) in C9ORF72 gene was recently reported as the main cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and cases with frontotemporal dementia. We screened C9ORF72 in a large cohort of 259 familial ALS, 1275 sporadic ALS, and 862 control individuals of Italian descent. We found RE in 23.9% familial ALS, 5.1% sporadic ALS, and 0.2% controls. Two cases carried the RE together with mutations in other ALS-associated genes. The phenotype of RE carriers was characterized by bulbar-onset, shorter survival, and association with cognitive and behavioral impairment. Extrapyramidal and cerebellar signs were also observed in few patients. Genotype data revealed that 95% of RE carriers shared a restricted 10-single nucleotide polymorphism haplotype within the previously reported 20-single nucleotide polymorphism risk haplotype, detectable in only 27% of nonexpanded ALS cases and in 28% of controls, suggesting a common founder with cohorts of North European ancestry. Although C9ORF72 RE segregates with disease, the identification of RE both in controls and in patients carrying additional pathogenic mutations suggests that penetrance and phenotypic expression of C9ORF72 RE may depend on additional genetic risk factors.
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An over-oxidized form of superoxide dismutase found in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with bulbar onset shares a toxic mechanism with mutant SOD1.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Recent studies suggest that Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) could be pathogenic in both familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through either inheritable or nonheritable modifications. The presence of a misfolded WT SOD1 in patients with sporadic ALS, along with the recently reported evidence that reducing SOD1 levels in astrocytes derived from sporadic patients inhibits astrocyte-mediated toxicity on motor neurons, suggest that WT SOD1 may acquire toxic properties similar to familial ALS-linked mutant SOD1, perhaps through posttranslational modifications. Using patients lymphoblasts, we show here that indeed WT SOD1 is modified posttranslationally in sporadic ALS and is iper-oxidized (i.e., above baseline oxidation levels) in a subset of patients with bulbar onset. Derivatization analysis of oxidized carbonyl compounds performed on immunoprecipitated SOD1 identified an iper-oxidized SOD1 that recapitulates mutant SOD1-like properties and damages mitochondria by forming a toxic complex with mitochondrial Bcl-2. This study conclusively demonstrates the existence of an iper-oxidized SOD1 with toxic properties in patient-derived cells and identifies a common SOD1-dependent toxicity between mutant SOD1-linked familial ALS and a subset of sporadic ALS, providing an opportunity to develop biomarkers to subclassify ALS and devise SOD1-based therapies that go beyond the small group of patients with mutant SOD1.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.