JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Structure of Acidic pH Dengue Virus Showing the Fusogenic Glycoprotein Trimers.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 10-31-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Flaviviruses undergo large conformational changes during their life cycle. Under acidic pH conditions the mature virus forms transient fusogenic trimers of E glycoproteins that engage the lipid membrane in host cells to initiate the viral fusion and nucleocapsid penetration into the cytoplasm. However, the dynamic nature of the fusogenic trimer has made the determination of its structure a challenge. Here we have used Fab fragments of the neutralizing antibody DV2-E104 to stop the conformational change of Dengue virus at an intermediate stage of the fusion process. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we show that in this intermediate stage the E glycoproteins form 60 trimers that are similar to the predicted "open" fusogenic trimer.
Related JoVE Video
High-resolution structure of a virally encoded DNA-translocating conduit and the mechanism of DNA penetration.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although ?X174 DNA pilot protein H is monomeric during procapsid assembly, it forms an oligomeric tube on the host cell surface. Reminiscent of a double-stranded DNA phage tail in form and function, the H tube transports the single-stranded ?X174 genome across the Escherichia coli cell wall. The 2.4-Å resolution H-tube crystal structure suggests functional and energetic mechanisms that may be common features of DNA transport through virally encoded conduits.
Related JoVE Video
A molecularly cloned, live-attenuated japanese encephalitis vaccine SA14-14-2 virus: a conserved single amino acid in the ij Hairpin of the Viral E glycoprotein determines neurovirulence in mice.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes fatal neurological disease in humans, is one of the most important emerging pathogens of public health significance. JEV represents the JE serogroup, which also includes West Nile, Murray Valley encephalitis, and St. Louis encephalitis viruses. Within this serogroup, JEV is a vaccine-preventable pathogen, but the molecular basis of its neurovirulence remains unknown. Here, we constructed an infectious cDNA of the most widely used live-attenuated JE vaccine, SA14-14-2, and rescued from the cDNA a molecularly cloned virus, SA14-14-2MCV, which displayed in vitro growth properties and in vivo attenuation phenotypes identical to those of its parent, SA14-14-2. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of neurovirulence, we selected three independent, highly neurovirulent variants (LD50, <1.5 PFU) from SA14-14-2MCV (LD50, >1.5×105 PFU) by serial intracerebral passage in mice. Complete genome sequence comparison revealed a total of eight point mutations, with a common single G1708?A substitution replacing a Gly with Glu at position 244 of the viral E glycoprotein. Using our infectious SA14-14-2 cDNA technology, we showed that this single Gly-to-Glu change at E-244 is sufficient to confer lethal neurovirulence in mice, including rapid development of viral spread and tissue inflammation in the central nervous system. Comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis of E-244, coupled with homology-based structure modeling, demonstrated a novel essential regulatory role in JEV neurovirulence for E-244, within the ij hairpin of the E dimerization domain. In both mouse and human neuronal cells, we further showed that the E-244 mutation altered JEV infectivity in vitro, in direct correlation with the level of neurovirulence in vivo, but had no significant impact on viral RNA replication. Our results provide a crucial step toward developing novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against JEV and possibly other encephalitic flaviviruses.
Related JoVE Video
Locking and blocking the viral landscape of an alphavirus with neutralizing antibodies.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Alphaviruses are serious, sometimes lethal human pathogens that belong to the family Togaviridae. The structures of human Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), an alphavirus, in complex with two strongly neutralizing antibody Fab fragments (F5 and 3B4C-4) have been determined using a combination of cryo-electron microscopy and homology modeling. We characterize these monoclonal antibody Fab fragments, which are known to abrogate VEEV infectivity by binding to the E2 (envelope) surface glycoprotein. Both of these antibody Fab fragments cross-link the surface E2 glycoproteins and therefore probably inhibit infectivity by blocking the conformational changes that are required for making the virus fusogenic. The F5 Fab fragment cross-links E2 proteins within one trimeric spike, whereas the 3B4C-4 Fab fragment cross-links E2 proteins from neighboring spikes. Furthermore, F5 probably blocks the receptor-binding site, whereas 3B4C-4 sterically hinders the exposure of the fusion loop at the end of the E2 B-domain.
Related JoVE Video
Dynamic attachment of Chlorovirus PBCV-1 to Chlorella variabilis.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chloroviruses infect their hosts by specifically binding to and degrading the cell wall of their algal hosts at the site of attachment, using an intrinsic digesting enzyme(s). Chlorovirus PBCV-1 stored as a lysate survived longer than virus alone, suggesting virus attachment to cellular debris may be reversible. Ghost cells (algal cells extracted with methanol) were used as a model to study reversibility of PBCV-1 attachment because ghost cells are as susceptible to attachment and wall digestion as are live cells. Reversibility of attachment to ghost cells was examined by releasing attached virions with a cell wall degrading enzyme extract. The majority of the released virions retained infectivity even after re-incubating the released virions with ghost cells two times. Thus the chloroviruses appear to have a dynamic attachment strategy that may be beneficial in indigenous environments where cell wall debris can act as a refuge until appropriate host cells are available.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of the 3.3MDa, in vitro assembled, hubless bacteriophage T4 baseplate.
J. Struct. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The bacteriophage T4 baseplate is the control center of the virus, where the recognition of an Escherichiacoli host by the long tail fibers is translated into a signal to initiate infection. The short tail fibers unfold from the baseplate for firm attachment to the host, followed by shrinkage of the tail sheath that causes the tail tube to enter and cross the periplasmic space ending with injection of the genome into the host. During this process, the 6.5MDa baseplate changes its structure from a "dome" shape to a "star" shape. An in vitro assembled hubless baseplate has been crystallized. It consists of six copies of the recombinantly expressed trimeric gene product (gp) 10, monomeric gp7, dimeric gp8, dimeric gp6 and monomeric gp53. The diffraction pattern extends, at most, to 4.0Å resolution. The known partial structures of gp10, gp8, and gp6 and their relative position in the baseplate derived from earlier electron microscopy studies were used for molecular replacement. An electron density map has been calculated based on molecular replacement, single isomorphous replacement with anomalous dispersion data and 2-fold non-crystallographic symmetry averaging between two baseplate wedges in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The current electron density map indicates that there are structural changes in the gp6, gp8, and gp10 oligomers compared to their structures when separately crystallized. Additional density is also visible corresponding to gp7, gp53 and the unknown parts of gp10 and gp6.
Related JoVE Video
Serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.
IUCrJ
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A brief history is given of how X-ray diffraction data from crystals have been recorded. Today there are new possibilities, spawned by the availability of free electron lasers that produce powerful femtosecond long X-ray pulses.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of large dsDNA viruses.
Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA viruses (NCLDVs) encompass an ever-increasing group of large eukaryotic viruses, infecting a wide variety of organisms. The set of core genes shared by all these viruses includes a major capsid protein with a double jelly-roll fold forming an icosahedral capsid, which surrounds a double layer membrane that contains the viral genome. Furthermore, some of these viruses, such as the members of the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae have a unique vertex that is used during infection to transport DNA into the host.
Related JoVE Video
Neutralizing antibodies can initiate genome release from human enterovirus 71.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Antibodies were prepared by immunizing mice with empty, immature particles of human enterovirus 71 (EV71), a picornavirus that causes severe neurological disease in young children. The capsid structure of these empty particles is different from that of the mature virus and is similar to "A" particles encountered when picornaviruses recognize a potential host cell before genome release. The monoclonal antibody E18, generated by this immunization, induced a conformational change when incubated at temperatures between 4 °C and 37 °C with mature virus, transforming infectious virions into A particles. The resultant loss of genome that was observed by cryo-EM and a fluorescent SYBR Green dye assay inactivated the virus, establishing the mechanism by which the virus is inactivated and demonstrating that the E18 antibody has potential as an anti-EV71 therapy. The antibody-mediated virus neutralization by the induction of genome release has not been previously demonstrated. Furthermore, the present results indicate that antibodies with genome-release activity could also be produced for other picornaviruses by immunization with immature particles.
Related JoVE Video
Molecular architecture of tailed double-stranded DNA phages.
Bacteriophage
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages, or Caudovirales, constitute ~96% of all the known phages. Although these phages come in a great variety of sizes and morphology, their virions are mainly constructed of similar molecular building blocks via similar assembly pathways. Here we review the structure of tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages at a molecular level, emphasizing the structural similarity and common evolutionary origin of proteins that constitute these virions.
Related JoVE Video
Rubella virus capsid protein structure and its role in virus assembly and infection.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Rubella virus (RV) is a leading cause of birth defects due to infectious agents. When contracted during pregnancy, RV infection leads to severe damage in fetuses. Despite its medical importance, compared with the related alphaviruses, very little is known about the structure of RV. The RV capsid protein is an essential structural component of virions as well as a key factor in virus-host interactions. Here we describe three crystal structures of the structural domain of the RV capsid protein. The polypeptide fold of the RV capsid protomer has not been observed previously. Combining the atomic structure of the RV capsid protein with the cryoelectron tomograms of RV particles established a low-resolution structure of the virion. Mutational studies based on this structure confirmed the role of amino acid residues in the capsid that function in the assembly of infectious virions.
Related JoVE Video
Mechanism for maturation-related reorganization of flavivirus glycoproteins.
J. Struct. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-04-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Flaviviruses, such as dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses, assemble as fusion-incompetent particles and subsequently undergo a large reorganization of their glycoprotein envelope resulting in formation of mature infectious virions. Here we used a combination of three-dimensional cryo-electron tomography and two-dimensional image analysis to study pleomorphic maturation intermediates of dengue virus 2. Icosahedral symmetries of immature and mature regions within one particle were mismatched relative to each other. Furthermore, the orientation of the two regions relative to each other differed among particles. Therefore, there cannot be a specific pathway determining the maturation of all particles. Instead, the region with mature structure expands when glycoproteins on its boundary acquire suitable orientation and conformation to allow them to become a stable part of the mature region. This type of maturation is possible because the envelope glycoproteins are anchored to the phospholipid bilayer that is a part of flavivirus virions and are thus restricted to movement on the two-dimensional surface of the particle. Therefore, compounds that limit movement of the glycoproteins within the virus membrane might be used as inhibitors of flavivirus maturation.
Related JoVE Video
The structure and host entry of an invertebrate parvovirus.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The 3.5-? resolution X-ray crystal structure of mature cricket parvovirus (Acheta domesticus densovirus [AdDNV]) has been determined. Structural comparisons show that vertebrate and invertebrate parvoviruses have evolved independently, although there are common structural features among all parvovirus capsid proteins. It was shown that raising the temperature of the AdDNV particles caused a loss of their genomes. The structure of these emptied particles was determined by cryo-electron microscopy to 5.5-? resolution, and the capsid structure was found to be the same as that for the full, mature virus except for the absence of the three ordered nucleotides observed in the crystal structure. The viral protein 1 (VP1) amino termini could be externalized without significant damage to the capsid. In vitro, this externalization of the VP1 amino termini is accompanied by the release of the viral genome.
Related JoVE Video
Morphogenesis of mimivirus and its viral factories: an atomic force microscopy study of infected cells.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Amoebas infected with mimivirus were disrupted at sequential stages of virus production and were visualized by atomic force microscopy. The development of virus factories proceeded over 3 to 4 h postinfection and resulted from the coalescence of 0.5- to 2-?m vesicles, possibly bearing nucleic acid, derived from either the nuclear membrane or the closely associated rough endoplasmic reticulum. Virus factories actively producing virus capsids on their surfaces were imaged, and this allowed the morphogenesis of the capsids to be delineated. The first feature to appear on a virus factory surface when a new capsid is born is the center of a stargate, which is a pentameric protein oligomer. As the arms of the stargate grow from the pentamer, a rough disk the diameter of a capsid thickens around it. This marks the initial emergence of a protein-coated membrane vesicle. The capsid self-assembles on the vesicle. Hillocks capped by different pentameric proteins spontaneously appear on the emerging vesicle at positions that are ultimately occupied by 5-fold icosahedral vertices. A lattice of coat protein nucleates at each of the 5-fold vertices, but not at the stargate, and then spreads outward from the vertices over the surface, merging seamlessly to complete the icosahedral capsid. Filling with DNA and associated proteins occurs by the transfer of nucleic acid from the interior of the virus factory into the nearly completed capsids. The portal, through which the DNA enters, is sealed by a plug of protein having a diameter of about 40 nm. A layer of integument protein that anchors the surface fibers is acquired by the passage of capsids through a membrane enriched in the protein. The coating of surface fibers is similarly acquired when the integument protein-coated capsids pass through a second membrane that has a forest of surface fibers embedded on one side.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of viruses: a short history.
Q. Rev. Biophys.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This review is a partially personal account of the discovery of virus structure and its implication for virus function. Although I have endeavored to cover all aspects of structural virology and to acknowledge relevant individuals, I know that I have favored taking examples from my own experience in telling this story. I am anxious to apologize to all those who I might have unintentionally offended by omitting their work. The first knowledge of virus structure was a result of Stanleys studies of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the subsequent X-ray fiber diffraction analysis by Bernal and Fankuchen in the 1930s. At about the same time it became apparent that crystals of small RNA plant and animal viruses could diffract X-rays, demonstrating that viruses must have distinct and unique structures. More advances were made in the 1950s with the realization by Watson and Crick that viruses might have icosahedral symmetry. With the improvement of experimental and computational techniques in the 1970s, it became possible to determine the three-dimensional, near-atomic resolution structures of some small icosahedral plant and animal RNA viruses. It was a great surprise that the protecting capsids of the first virus structures to be determined had the same architecture. The capsid proteins of these viruses all had a jelly-roll fold and, furthermore, the organization of the capsid protein in the virus were similar, suggesting a common ancestral virus from which many of todays viruses have evolved. By this time a more detailed structure of TMV had also been established, but both the architecture and capsid protein fold were quite different to that of the icosahedral viruses. The small icosahedral RNA virus structures were also informative of how and where cellular receptors, anti-viral compounds, and neutralizing antibodies bound to these viruses. However, larger lipid membrane enveloped viruses did not form sufficiently ordered crystals to obtain good X-ray diffraction. Starting in the 1990s, these enveloped viruses were studied by combining cryo-electron microscopy of the whole virus with X-ray crystallography of their protein components. These structures gave information on virus assembly, virus neutralization by antibodies, and virus fusion with and entry into the host cell. The same techniques were also employed in the study of complex bacteriophages that were too large to crystallize. Nevertheless, there still remained many pleomorphic, highly pathogenic viruses that lacked the icosahedral symmetry and homogeneity that had made the earlier structural investigations possible. Currently some of these viruses are starting to be studied by combining X-ray crystallography with cryo-electron tomography.
Related JoVE Video
Structure-Function Analysis of the DNA Translocating Portal of the Bacteriophage T4 Packaging Machine.
J. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special 5-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages ?29, SPP1, and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the Escherichia coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and we fit the dodecamer into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone shaped with the wider end containing the "wing" and "crown" domains inside the phage head. A long "stem" encloses a central channel, and a narrow "stalk" protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and the portal. The "tunnel" loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging.
Related JoVE Video
Obstruction of dengue virus maturation by Fab fragments of the 2H2 antibody.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The 2H2 monoclonal antibody recognizes the precursor peptide on immature dengue virus and might therefore be a useful tool for investigating the conformational change that occurs when the immature virus enters an acidic environment. During dengue virus maturation, spiky, immature, noninfectious virions change their structure to form smooth-surfaced particles in the slightly acidic environment of the trans-Golgi network, thereby allowing cellular furin to cleave the precursor-membrane proteins. The dengue virions become fully infectious when they release the cleaved precursor peptide upon reaching the neutral-pH environment of the extracellular space. Here we report on the cryo-electron microscopy structures of the immature virus complexed with the 2H2 antigen binding fragments (Fab) at different concentrations and under various pH conditions. At neutral pH and a high concentration of Fab molecules, three Fab molecules bind to three precursor-membrane proteins on each spike of the immature virus. However, at a low concentration of Fab molecules and pH 7.0, only two Fab molecules bind to each spike. Changing to a slightly acidic pH caused no detectable change of structure for the sample with a high Fab concentration but caused severe structural damage to the low-concentration sample. Therefore, the 2H2 Fab inhibits the maturation process of immature dengue virus when Fab molecules are present at a high concentration, because the three Fab molecules on each spike hold the precursor-membrane molecules together, thereby inhibiting the normal conformational change that occurs during maturation.
Related JoVE Video
Icosahedral bacteriophage ?X174 forms a tail for DNA transport during infection.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Prokaryotic viruses have evolved various mechanisms to transport their genomes across bacterial cell walls. Many bacteriophages use a tail to perform this function, whereas tail-less phages rely on host organelles. However, the tail-less, icosahedral, single-stranded DNA ?X174-like coliphages do not fall into these well-defined infection processes. For these phages, DNA delivery requires a DNA pilot protein. Here we show that the ?X174 pilot protein H oligomerizes to form a tube whose function is most probably to deliver the DNA genome across the hosts periplasmic space to the cytoplasm. The 2.4?Å resolution crystal structure of the in vitro assembled H proteins central domain consists of a 170?Å-long ?-helical barrel. The tube is constructed of ten ?-helices with their amino termini arrayed in a right-handed super-helical coiled-coil and their carboxy termini arrayed in a left-handed super-helical coiled-coil. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that the tube is essential for infectivity but does not affect in vivo virus assembly. Cryo-electron tomograms show that tubes span the periplasmic space and are present while the genome is being delivered into the host cells cytoplasm. Both ends of the H protein contain transmembrane domains, which anchor the assembled tubes into the inner and outer cell membranes. The central channel of the H-protein tube is lined with amide and guanidinium side chains. This may be a general property of viral DNA conduits and is likely to be critical for efficient genome translocation into the host.
Related JoVE Video
Dengue structure differs at the temperatures of its human and mosquito hosts.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We report on a conformational transition of dengue virus when changing the temperature from that present in its mosquito vectors to that of its human host. Using cryoelectron microscopy, we show that although the virus has a smooth surface, a diameter of ?500 Å, and little exposed membrane at room temperature, the virions have a bumpy appearance with a diameter of ?550 Å and some exposed membrane at 37 °C. The bumpy structure at 37 °C was found to be similar to the previously predicted structure of an intermediate between the smooth mature and fusogenic forms. As humans have a body temperature of 37 °C, the bumpy form of the virus would be the form present in humans. Thus, optimal dengue virus vaccines should induce antibodies that preferentially recognize epitopes exposed on the bumpy form of the virus.
Related JoVE Video
Membrane curvature in flaviviruses.
J. Struct. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Coordinated interplay between membrane proteins and the lipid bilayer is required for such processes as transporter function and the entrance of enveloped viruses into host cells. In this study, three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy density maps of mature and immature flaviviruses were analyzed to assess the curvature of the membrane leaflets and its relation to membrane-bound viral glycoproteins. The overall morphology of the viral membrane is determined by the icosahedral scaffold composed of envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins through interaction of the proteins stem-anchor regions with the membrane. In localized regions, small membrane areas exhibit convex, concave, flat or saddle-shaped surfaces that are constrained by the specific protein organization within each membrane leaflet. These results suggest that the organization of membrane proteins in small enveloped viruses mediate the formation of membrane curvature.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of human enterovirus 71 in complex with a capsid-binding inhibitor.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Human enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus causing hand, foot, and mouth disease that may progress to fatal encephalitis in infants and small children. As of now, no cure is available for enterovirus 71 infections. Small molecule inhibitors binding into a hydrophobic pocket within capsid viral protein 1 were previously shown to effectively limit infectivity of many picornaviruses. Here we report a 3.2-Å-resolution X-ray structure of the enterovirus 71 virion complexed with the capsid-binding inhibitor WIN 51711. The inhibitor replaced the natural pocket factor within the viral protein 1 pocket without inducing any detectable rearrangements in the structure of the capsid. Furthermore, we show that the compound stabilizes enterovirus 71 virions and limits its infectivity, probably through restricting dynamics of the capsid necessary for genome release. Thus, our results provide a structural basis for development of antienterovirus 71 capsid-binding drugs.
Related JoVE Video
Structural analyses at pseudo atomic resolution of Chikungunya virus and antibodies show mechanisms of neutralization.
Elife
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A 5.3 Å resolution, cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) map of Chikungunya virus-like particles (VLPs) has been interpreted using the previously published crystal structure of the Chikungunya E1-E2 glycoprotein heterodimer. The heterodimer structure was divided into domains to obtain a good fit to the cryoEM density. Differences in the T = 4 quasi-equivalent heterodimer components show their adaptation to different environments. The spikes on the icosahedral 3-fold axes and those in general positions are significantly different, possibly representing different phases during initial generation of fusogenic E1 trimers. CryoEM maps of neutralizing Fab fragments complexed with VLPs have been interpreted using the crystal structures of the Fab fragments and the VLP structure. Based on these analyses the CHK-152 antibody was shown to stabilize the viral surface, hindering the exposure of the fusion-loop, likely neutralizing infection by blocking fusion. The CHK-9, m10 and m242 antibodies surround the receptor-attachment site, probably inhibiting infection by blocking cell attachment. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00435.001.
Related JoVE Video
Super-secondary structure: a historical perspective.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The history of the concept of protein folds is discussed, starting with the original concept of super-secondary structure. This has led to the recognition of a fairly small number of distinct folds defining individual domains within larger proteins. Each fold can usually be associated with a specific function. Thus the active site of an enzyme is likely to be at the boundary between domains, each contributing a simple function to a more complex process.
Related JoVE Video
The molecular architecture of the bacteriophage T4 neck.
J. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A hexamer of the bacteriophage T4 tail terminator protein, gp15, attaches to the top of the phage tail stabilizing the contractile sheath and forming the interface for binding of the independently assembled head. Here we report the crystal structure of the gp15 hexamer, describe its interactions in T4 virions that have either an extended tail or a contracted tail, and discuss its structural relationship to other phage proteins. The neck of T4 virions is decorated by the "collar" and "whiskers", made of fibritin molecules. Fibritin acts as a chaperone helping to attach the long tail fibers to the virus during the assembly process. The collar and whiskers are environment-sensing devices, regulating the retraction of the long tail fibers under unfavorable conditions, thus preventing infection. Cryo-electron microscopy analysis suggests that twelve fibritin molecules attach to the phage neck with six molecules forming the collar and six molecules forming the whiskers.
Related JoVE Video
Structure and function of the small terminase component of the DNA packaging machine in T4-like bacteriophages.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-29-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Tailed DNA bacteriophages assemble empty procapsids that are subsequently filled with the viral genome by means of a DNA packaging machine situated at a special fivefold vertex. The packaging machine consists of a "small terminase" and a "large terminase" component. One of the functions of the small terminase is to initiate packaging of the viral genome, whereas the large terminase is responsible for the ATP-powered translocation of DNA. The small terminase subunit has three domains, an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a central oligomerization domain, and a C-terminal domain for interacting with the large terminase. Here we report structures of the central domain in two different oligomerization states for a small terminase from the T4 family of phages. In addition, we report biochemical studies that establish the function for each of the small terminase domains. On the basis of the structural and biochemical information, we propose a model for DNA packaging initiation.
Related JoVE Video
Structures of giant icosahedral eukaryotic dsDNA viruses.
Curr Opin Virol
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In the last twenty years, numerous giant, dsDNA, icosahedral viruses have been discovered and assigned to the nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA virus (NCLDV) clade. The major capsid proteins of these viruses consist of two consecutive jelly-roll domains, assembled into trimers, with pseudo 6-fold symmetry. The capsomers are assembled into arrays that have either p6 (as in Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1) or p3 symmetry (as in Mimivirus). Most of the NCLDV viruses have a membrane that separates the nucleocapsid from the external capsid.
Related JoVE Video
Three-dimensional structure and function of the Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus capsid.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A cryoelectron microscopy 8.5 ? resolution map of the 1,900 ? diameter, icosahedral, internally enveloped Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus was used to interpret structures of the virus at initial stages of cell infection. A fivefold averaged map demonstrated that two minor capsid proteins involved in stabilizing the capsid are missing in the vicinity of the unique vertex. Reconstruction of the virus in the presence of host chlorella cell walls established that the spike at the unique vertex initiates binding to the cell wall, which results in the enveloped nucleocapsid moving closer to the cell. This process is concurrent with the release of the internal viral membrane that was linked to the capsid by many copies of a viral membrane protein in the mature infectous virus. Simultaneously, part of the trisymmetrons around the unique vertex disassemble, probably in part because two minor capsid proteins are absent, causing Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus and the cellular contents to merge, possibly as a result of enzyme(s) within the spike assembly. This may be one of only a few recordings of successive stages of a virus while infecting a eukaryotic host in pseudoatomic detail in three dimensions.
Related JoVE Video
Structural conservation of the myoviridae phage tail sheath protein fold.
Structure
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 Å diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 Å-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 Å resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 Å resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.
Related JoVE Video
Mimivirus shows dramatic genome reduction after intraamoebal culture.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Most phagocytic protist viruses have large particles and genomes as well as many laterally acquired genes that may be associated with a sympatric intracellular life (a community-associated lifestyle with viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes) and the presence of virophages. By subculturing Mimivirus 150 times in a germ-free amoebal host, we observed the emergence of a bald form of the virus that lacked surface fibers and replicated in a morphologically different type of viral factory. When studying a 0.40-?m filtered cloned particle, we found that its genome size shifted from 1.2 (M1) to 0.993 Mb (M4), mainly due to large deletions occurring at both ends of the genome. Some of the lost genes are encoding enzymes required for posttranslational modification of the structural viral proteins, such as glycosyltransferases and ankyrin repeat proteins. Proteomic analysis allowed identification of three proteins, probably required for the assembly of virus fibers. The genes for two of these were found to be deleted from the M4 virus genome. The proteins associated with fibers are highly antigenic and can be recognized by mouse and human antimimivirus antibodies. In addition, the bald strain (M4) was not able to propagate the sputnik virophage. Overall, the Mimivirus transition from a sympatric to an allopatric lifestyle was associated with a stepwise genome reduction and the production of a predominantly bald virophage resistant strain. The new axenic ecosystem allowed the allopatric Mimivirus to lose unnecessary genes that might be involved in the control of competitors.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of the three N-terminal immunoglobulin domains of the highly immunogenic outer capsid protein from a T4-like bacteriophage.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.
Related JoVE Video
Future prospects.
Adv Protein Chem Struct Biol
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) in combination with single-particle analysis has begun to complement crystallography in the study of large macromolecules at near-atomic resolution. Furthermore, advances in cryo-electron tomography have made possible the study of macromolecules within their cellular environment. Single-particle and tomographic studies will become even more useful when technologies for improving the signal-to-noise ratio such as direct electron detectors and phase plates become widely available. Automated image acquisition has significantly reduced the time and effort required to determine the structures of macromolecular assemblies. As a result, the number of structures determined by cryo-EM is growing exponentially. However, there is an urgent need for improved criteria for validating both the reconstruction process and the atomic models derived from cryo-EM data. Another major challenge will be mitigating the effects of anisotropy caused by the missing wedge and the excessively low signal-to-noise ratio for tomographic data. Parallels between the development of macromolecular crystallography and cryo-EM have been used to tentatively predict the future of cryo-EM.
Related JoVE Video
Maturation of flaviviruses starts from one or more icosahedrally independent nucleation centres.
EMBO Rep.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Flaviviruses assemble as fusion-incompetent immature particles and subsequently undergo conformational change leading to release of infectious virions. Flavivirus infections also produce combined mosaic particles. Here, using cryo-electron tomography, we report that mosaic particles of dengue virus type 2 had glycoproteins organized into two regions of mature and immature structure. Furthermore, particles of a maturation-deficient mutant had their glycoproteins organized into two regions of immature structure with mismatching icosahedral symmetries. It is therefore apparent that the maturation-related reorganization of the flavivirus glycoproteins is not synchronized across the whole virion, but is initiated from one or more nucleation centres. Similar deviation from icosahedral symmetry might be relevant to the asymmetrical mode of genome packaging and cell entry of other viruses.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of bacteriophage phi29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The tailed bacteriophage 29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 ? in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 ?. The structure is about 150 ? long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless 29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.
Related JoVE Video
Analysis of phases in the structure determination of an icosahedral virus.
Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crystallogr.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The constraints imposed on structure-factor phases by noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) allow phase improvement, phase extension to higher resolution and hence ab initio phase determination. The more numerous the NCS redundancy and the greater the volume used for solvent flattening, the greater the power for phase determination. In a case analyzed here the icosahedral NCS phasing appeared to have broken down, although later successful phase extension was possible when the envelope around the NCS region was tightened. The phases from the failed phase-determination attempt fell into four classes, all of which satisfied the NCS constraints. These four classes corresponded to the correct solution, opposite enantiomorph, Babinet inversion and opposite enantiomorph with Babinet inversion. These incorrect solutions can be seeded from structure factors belonging to reciprocal-space volumes that lie close to icosahedral NCS axes where the structure amplitudes tend to be large and the phases tend to be 0 or ?. Furthermore, the false solutions can spread more easily if there are large errors in defining the envelope designating the region in which NCS averaging is performed.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of a packaging-defective mutant of minute virus of mice indicates that the genome is packaged via a pore at a 5-fold axis.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) packages a single copy of its linear single-stranded DNA genome into preformed capsids, in a process that is probably driven by a virus-encoded helicase. Parvoviruses have a roughly cylindrically shaped pore that surrounds each of the 12 5-fold vertices. The pore, which penetrates the virion shell, is created by the juxtaposition of 10 antiparallel ?-strands, two from each of the 5-fold-related capsid proteins. There is a bottleneck in the channel formed by the symmetry-related side chains of the leucines at position 172. We report here the X-ray crystal structure of the particles produced by a leucine-to-tryptophan mutation at position 172 and the analysis of its biochemical properties. The mutant capsid had its 5-fold channel blocked, and the particles were unable to package DNA, strongly suggesting that the 5-fold pore is the packaging portal for genome entry.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of Bombyx mori densovirus 1, a silkworm pathogen.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Bombyx mori densovirus 1 (BmDNV-1), a major pathogen of silkworms, causes significant losses to the silk industry. The structure of the recombinant BmDNV-1 virus-like particle has been determined at 3.1-Å resolution using X-ray crystallography. It is the first near-atomic-resolution structure of a virus-like particle within the genus Iteravirus. The particles consist of 60 copies of the 55-kDa VP3 coat protein. The capsid protein has a ?-barrel "jelly roll" fold similar to that found in many diverse icosahedral viruses, including archaeal, bacterial, plant, and animal viruses, as well as other parvoviruses. Most of the surface loops have little structural resemblance to other known parvovirus capsid proteins. In contrast to vertebrate parvoviruses, the N-terminal ?-strand of BmDNV-1 VP3 is positioned relative to the neighboring 2-fold related subunit in a "domain-swapped" conformation, similar to findings for other invertebrate parvoviruses, suggesting domain swapping is an evolutionarily conserved structural feature of the Densovirinae.
Related JoVE Video
Bacteriophage assembly.
Viruses
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.
Related JoVE Video
Structural studies of Hantaan virus.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hantaan virus is the prototypic member of the Hantavirus genus within the family Bunyaviridae and is a causative agent of the potentially fatal hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. The Bunyaviridae are a family of negative-sense RNA viruses with three-part segmented genomes. Virions are enveloped and decorated with spikes derived from a pair of glycoproteins (Gn and Gc). Here, we present cryo-electron tomography and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy studies of Hantaan virus virions. We have determined the structure of the tetrameric Gn-Gc spike complex to a resolution of 2.5 nm and show that spikes are ordered in lattices on the virion surface. Large cytoplasmic extensions associated with each Gn-Gc spike also form a lattice on the inner surface of the viral membrane. Rod-shaped ribonucleoprotein complexes are arranged into nearly parallel pairs and triplets within virions. Our results differ from the T=12 icosahedral organization found for some bunyaviruses. However, a comparison of our results with the previous tomographic studies of the nonpathogenic Tula hantavirus indicates a common structural organization for hantaviruses.
Related JoVE Video
Morphogenesis of the T4 tail and tail fibers.
Virol. J.
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Remarkable progress has been made during the past ten years in elucidating the structure of the bacteriophage T4 tail by a combination of three-dimensional image reconstruction from electron micrographs and X-ray crystallography of the components. Partial and complete structures of nine out of twenty tail structural proteins have been determined by X-ray crystallography and have been fitted into the 3D-reconstituted structure of the "extended" tail. The 3D structure of the "contracted" tail was also determined and interpreted in terms of component proteins. Given the pseudo-atomic tail structures both before and after contraction, it is now possible to understand the gross conformational change of the baseplate in terms of the change in the relative positions of the subunit proteins. These studies have explained how the conformational change of the baseplate and contraction of the tail are related to the tails host cell recognition and membrane penetration function. On the other hand, the baseplate assembly process has been recently reexamined in detail in a precise system involving recombinant proteins (unlike the earlier studies with phage mutants). These experiments showed that the sequential association of the subunits of the baseplate wedge is based on the induced-fit upon association of each subunit. It was also found that, upon association of gp53 (gene product 53), the penultimate subunit of the wedge, six of the wedge intermediates spontaneously associate to form a baseplate-like structure in the absence of the central hub. Structure determination of the rest of the subunits and intermediate complexes and the assembly of the hub still require further study.
Related JoVE Video
Neutralization of West Nile virus by cross-linking of its surface proteins with Fab fragments of the human monoclonal antibody CR4354.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens, with the humoral immune response playing an essential role in restricting infection and disease. CR4354, a human monoclonal antibody isolated from a patient, neutralizes West Nile virus (WNV) infection at a postattachment stage in the viral life-cycle. Here, we determined the structure of WNV complexed with Fab fragments of CR4354 using cryoelectron microscopy. The outer glycoprotein shell of a mature WNV particle is formed by 30 rafts of three homodimers of the viral surface protein E. CR4354 binds to a discontinuous epitope formed by protein segments from two neighboring E molecules, but does not cause any detectable structural disturbance on the viral surface. The epitope occurs at two independent positions within an icosahedral asymmetric unit, resulting in 120 binding sites on the viral surface. The cross-linking of the six E monomers within one raft by four CR4354 Fab fragments suggests that the antibody neutralizes WNV by blocking the pH-induced rearrangement of the E protein required for virus fusion with the endosomal membrane.
Related JoVE Video
Interaction of decay-accelerating factor with echovirus 7.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Echovirus 7 (EV7) belongs to the Enterovirus genus within the family Picornaviridae. Many picornaviruses use IgG-like receptors that bind in the viral canyon and are required to initiate viral uncoating during infection. However, in addition, some of the enteroviruses use an alternative or additional receptor that binds outside the canyon. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) has been identified as a cellular receptor for EV7. The crystal structure of EV7 has been determined to 3.1-Å resolution and used to interpret the 7.2-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of EV7 complexed with DAF. Each DAF binding site on EV7 is near a 2-fold icosahedral symmetry axis, which differs from the binding site of DAF on the surface of coxsackievirus B3, indicating that there are independent evolutionary processes by which DAF was selected as a picornavirus accessory receptor. This suggests that there is an advantage for these viruses to recognize DAF during the initial process of infection.
Related JoVE Video
Crystal structure of a virus-encoded putative glycosyltransferase.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The chloroviruses (family Phycodnaviridae), unlike most viruses, encode some, if not most, of the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of their structural proteins. Annotation of the gene product B736L from chlorovirus NY-2A suggests that it is a glycosyltransferase. The structure of the recombinantly expressed B736L protein was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.3-Å resolution, and the protein was shown to have two nucleotide-binding folds like other glycosyltransferase type B enzymes. This is the second structure of a chlorovirus-encoded glycosyltransferase and the first structure of a chlorovirus type B enzyme to be determined. B736L is a retaining enzyme and belongs to glycosyltransferase family 4. The donor substrate was identified as GDP-mannose by isothermal titration calorimetry and was shown to bind into the cleft between the two domains in the protein. The active form of the enzyme is probably a dimer in which the active centers are separated by about 40 Å.
Related JoVE Video
Molecular mechanisms involved in the early steps of flavivirus cell entry.
Microbes Infect.
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Flaviviruses enter their host cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a well-orchestrated process of receptor recognition, penetration and uncoating. Recent findings on these early steps in the life cycle of flaviviruses are the focus of this review.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of Penaeus stylirostris densovirus, a shrimp pathogen.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV), a pathogen of penaeid shrimp, causes significant damage to farmed and wild shrimp populations. In contrast to other parvoviruses, PstDNV probably has only one type of capsid protein that lacks the phospholipase A2 activity that has been implicated as a requirement during parvoviral host cell infection. The structure of recombinant virus-like particles, composed of 60 copies of the 37.5-kDa coat protein, the smallest parvoviral capsid protein reported thus far, was determined to 2.5-Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structure represents the first near-atomic resolution structure within the genus Brevidensovirus. The capsid protein has a ?-barrel "jelly roll" motif similar to that found in many icosahedral viruses, including other parvoviruses. The N-terminal portion of the PstDNV coat protein adopts a "domain-swapped" conformation relative to its twofold-related neighbor similar to the insect parvovirus Galleria mellonella densovirus (GmDNV) but in stark contrast to vertebrate parvoviruses. However, most of the surface loops have little structural resemblance to any of the known parvoviral capsid proteins.
Related JoVE Video
Atomic force microscopy investigation of the giant mimivirus.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Mimivirus was investigated by atomic force microscopy in its native state following serial degradation by lysozyme and bromelain. The 750-nm diameter virus is coated with a forest of glycosylated protein fibers of lengths about 140 nm with diameters 1.4 nm. Fibers are capped with distinctive ellipsoidal protein heads of estimated Mr=25 kDa. The surface fibers are attached to the particle through a layer of protein covering the capsid, which is in turn composed of the major capsid protein (MCP). The latter is organized as an open network of hexagonal rings with central depressions separated by 14 nm. The virion exhibits an elaborate apparatus at a unique vertex, visible as a star shaped depression on native particles, but on defibered virions as five arms of 50 nm width and 250 nm length rising above the capsid by 20 nm. The apparatus is integrated into the capsid and not applied atop the icosahedral lattice. Prior to DNA release, the arms of the star disengage from the virion and it opens by folding back five adjacent triangular faces. A membrane sac containing the DNA emerges from the capsid in preparation for fusion with a membrane of the host cell. Also observed from disrupted virions were masses of distinctive fibers of diameter about 1 nm, and having a 7-nm periodicity. These are probably contained within the capsid along with the DNA bearing sac. The fibers were occasionally observed associated with toroidal protein clusters interpreted as processive enzymes modifying the fibers.
Related JoVE Video
The three-dimensional structure of Mimivirus.
Intervirology
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Mimivirus, the prototypic member of the new family of Mimiviridae, is the largest virus known to date. Progress has been made recently in determining the three-dimensional structure of the 0.75-microm diameter virion using cryo-electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. These showed that the virus is composed of an outer layer of dense fibers surrounding an icosahedrally shaped capsid and an internal membrane sac enveloping the genomic material of the virus. Additionally, a unique starfish-like structure at one of the fivefold vertices, required by the virus for infecting its host, has been defined in more detail.
Related JoVE Video
Structural changes of envelope proteins during alphavirus fusion.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Alphaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have a diameter of about 700?Å and can be lethal human pathogens. Entry of virus into host cells by endocytosis is controlled by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2. The E2-E1 heterodimers form 80 trimeric spikes on the icosahedral virus surface, 60 with quasi-three-fold symmetry and 20 coincident with the icosahedral three-fold axes arranged with T = 4 quasi-symmetry. The E1 glycoprotein has a hydrophobic fusion loop at one end and is responsible for membrane fusion. The E2 protein is responsible for receptor binding and protects the fusion loop at neutral pH. The lower pH in the endosome induces the virions to undergo an irreversible conformational change in which E2 and E1 dissociate and E1 forms homotrimers, triggering fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane and then releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Here we report the structure of an alphavirus spike, crystallized at low pH, representing an intermediate in the fusion process and clarifying the maturation process. The trimer of E2-E1 in the crystal structure is similar to the spikes in the neutral pH virus except that the E2 middle region is disordered, exposing the fusion loop. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of E2 each form immunoglobulin-like folds, consistent with the receptor attachment properties of E2.
Related JoVE Video
Functional analysis of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, a virus decoration protein from T4-like bacteriophages.
Mol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc. The Hoc molecule (40 kDa) is present at the centre of each hexameric capsomer and provides a good platform for surface display of pathogen antigens. Biochemical and modelling studies show that Hoc consists of a string of four domains, three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like and one non-Ig domain at the C-terminus. Biochemical data suggest that the Hoc protein has two functional modules, a capsid binding module containing domains 1 and 4 and a solvent-exposed module containing domains 2 and 3. This model is consistent with the dumbbell-shaped cryo-EM density of Hoc observed in the reconstruction of the T4 capsid. Mutagenesis localized the capsid binding site to the C-terminal 25 amino acids, which are predicted to form two beta-strands flanking a capsid binding loop. Mutations in the loop residues, ESRNG, abolished capsid binding, suggesting that these residues might interact with the major capsid protein, gp23*. With the conserved capsid binding module forming a foothold on the virus and the solvent-exposed module able to adapt to bind to a variety of surfaces, Hoc probably provides survival advantages to the phage, such as increasing the virus concentration near the host, efficient dispersion of the virus and exposing the tail for more efficient contact with the host cell surface prior to infection.
Related JoVE Video
Structural optimization and de novo design of dengue virus entry inhibitory peptides.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Viral fusogenic envelope proteins are important targets for the development of inhibitors of viral entry. We report an approach for the computational design of peptide inhibitors of the dengue 2 virus (DENV-2) envelope (E) protein using high-resolution structural data from a pre-entry dimeric form of the protein. By using predictive strategies together with computational optimization of binding "pseudoenergies", we were able to design multiple peptide sequences that showed low micromolar viral entry inhibitory activity. The two most active peptides, DN57opt and 1OAN1, were designed to displace regions in the domain II hinge, and the first domain I/domain II beta sheet connection, respectively, and show fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of 8 and 7 microM respectively in a focus forming unit assay. The antiviral peptides were shown to interfere with virus:cell binding, interact directly with the E proteins and also cause changes to the viral surface using biolayer interferometry and cryo-electron microscopy, respectively. These peptides may be useful for characterization of intermediate states in the membrane fusion process, investigation of DENV receptor molecules, and as lead compounds for drug discovery.
Related JoVE Video
Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of West Nile virus.
Acta Crystallogr. Sect. F Struct. Biol. Cryst. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
West Nile virus, a human pathogen, is closely related to other medically important flaviviruses of global impact such as dengue virus. The infectious virus was purified from cell culture using polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and density-gradient centrifugation. Thin amorphously shaped crystals of the lipid-enveloped virus were grown in quartz capillaries equilibrated by vapor diffusion. Crystal diffraction extended at best to a resolution of about 25 A using synchrotron radiation. A preliminary analysis of the diffraction images indicated that the crystals had unit-cell parameters a approximately b approximately 480 A, gamma = 120 degrees , suggesting a tight hexagonal packing of one virus particle per unit cell.
Related JoVE Video
A virus-like particle vaccine for epidemic Chikungunya virus protects nonhuman primates against infection.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has infected millions of people in Africa, Europe and Asia since this alphavirus reemerged from Kenya in 2004. The severity of the disease and the spread of this epidemic virus present a serious public health threat in the absence of vaccines or antiviral therapies. Here, we describe a new vaccine that protects against CHIKV infection of nonhuman primates. We show that selective expression of viral structural proteins gives rise to virus-like particles (VLPs) in vitro that resemble replication-competent alphaviruses. Immunization with these VLPs elicited neutralizing antibodies against envelope proteins from alternative CHIKV strains. Monkeys immunized with VLPs produced high-titer neutralizing antibodies that protected against viremia after high-dose challenge. We transferred these antibodies into immunodeficient mice, where they protected against subsequent lethal CHIKV challenge, indicating a humoral mechanism of protection. Immunization with alphavirus VLP vaccines represents a strategy to contain the spread of CHIKV and related pathogenic viruses in humans.
Related JoVE Video
Genome packaging in viruses.
Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Genome packaging is a fundamental process in a viral life cycle. Many viruses assemble preformed capsids into which the genomic material is subsequently packaged. These viruses use a packaging motor protein that is driven by the hydrolysis of ATP to condense the nucleic acids into a confined space. How these motor proteins package viral genomes had been poorly understood until recently, when a few X-ray crystal structures and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures became available. Here we discuss various aspects of genome packaging and compare the mechanisms proposed for packaging motors on the basis of structural information.
Related JoVE Video
Giant Marseillevirus highlights the role of amoebae as a melting pot in emergence of chimeric microorganisms.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Giant viruses such as Mimivirus isolated from amoeba found in aquatic habitats show biological sophistication comparable to that of simple cellular life forms and seem to evolve by similar mechanisms, including extensive gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), possibly in part through a viral parasite, the virophage. We report here the isolation of "Marseille" virus, a previously uncharacterized giant virus of amoeba. The virions of Marseillevirus encompass a 368-kb genome, a minimum of 49 proteins, and some messenger RNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of core genes indicates that Marseillevirus is the prototype of a family of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) of eukaryotes. The genome repertoire of the virus is composed of typical NCLDV core genes and genes apparently obtained from eukaryotic hosts and their parasites or symbionts, both bacterial and viral. We propose that amoebae are "melting pots" of microbial evolution where diverse forms emerge, including giant viruses with complex gene repertoires of various origins.
Related JoVE Video
Structural studies of the Sputnik virophage.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The virophage Sputnik is a satellite virus of the giant mimivirus and is the only satellite virus reported to date whose propagation adversely affects its host virus production. Genome sequence analysis showed that Sputnik has genes related to viruses infecting all three domains of life. Here, we report structural studies of Sputnik, which show that it is about 740 A in diameter, has a T=27 icosahedral capsid, and has a lipid membrane inside the protein shell. Structural analyses suggest that the major capsid protein of Sputnik is likely to have a double jelly-roll fold, although sequence alignments do not show any detectable similarity with other viral double jelly-roll capsid proteins. Hence, the origin of Sputniks capsid might have been derived from other viruses prior to its association with mimivirus.
Related JoVE Video
Capturing a flavivirus pre-fusion intermediate.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
During cell entry of flaviviruses, low endosomal pH triggers the rearrangement of the viral surface glycoproteins to a fusion-active state that allows the release of the infectious RNA into the cytoplasm. In this work, West Nile virus was complexed with Fab fragments of the neutralizing mAb E16 and was subsequently exposed to low pH, trapping the virions in a pre-fusion intermediate state. The structure of the complex was studied by cryo-electron microscopy and provides the first structural glimpse of a flavivirus fusion intermediate near physiological conditions. A radial expansion of the outer protein layer of the virion was observed compared to the structure at pH 8. The resulting approximately 60 A-wide shell of low density between lipid bilayer and outer protein layer is likely traversed by the stem region of the E glycoprotein. By using antibody fragments, we have captured a structural intermediate of a virus that likely occurs during cell entry. The trapping of structural transition states by antibody fragments will be applicable for other processes in the flavivirus life cycle and delineating other cellular events that involve conformational rearrangements.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of the small outer capsid protein, Soc: a clamp for stabilizing capsids of T4-like phages.
J. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a "glue" between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a "cage" that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.
Related JoVE Video
An icosahedral algal virus has a complex unique vertex decorated by a spike.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 is an icosahedrally shaped, 1,900-A-diameter virus that infects unicellular eukaryotic green algae. A 5-fold symmetric, 3D reconstruction using cryoelectron microscopy images has now shown that the quasiicosahedral virus has a unique vertex, with a pocket on the inside and a spike structure on the outside of the capsid. The pocket might contain enzymes for use in the initial stages of infection. The unique vertex consists of virally coded proteins, some of which have been identified. Comparison of shape, size, and location of the spike with similar features in bacteriophages T4 and P22 suggests that the spike might be a cell-puncturing device. Similar asymmetric features may have been missed in previous analyses of many other viruses that had been assumed to be perfectly icosahedral.
Related JoVE Video
RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from Flaviviridae.
Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Viral genome replication in Flaviviridae is carried out by a virally encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). These viruses initiate the RNA synthesis via a de novo mechanism that differs from the primer-dependent mechanism used by Picornaviridae. Like all polymerases, the structure of Flaviviridae RdRps resembles a right hand with characteristic fingers, palm, and thumb domains. Structural features that distinguish Flaviviridae RdRps from other polymerases are a large thumb domain and a C-terminal motif that encircles the active site. This domain arrangement restricts the volume of the template-binding channel, allowing only single-stranded RNA to enter the active site. While this closed form of the polymerase is ideal to stabilize a de novo initiation complex, significant conformational changes are expected to accommodate the elongation complex containing the RNA duplex product.
Related JoVE Video
Structural basis for the preferential recognition of immature flaviviruses by a fusion-loop antibody.
EMBO J.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Flaviviruses are a group of human pathogens causing severe encephalitic or hemorrhagic diseases that include West Nile, dengue and yellow fever viruses. Here, using X-ray crystallography we have defined the structure of the flavivirus cross-reactive antibody E53 that engages the highly conserved fusion loop of the West Nile virus envelope glycoprotein. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we also determined that E53 Fab binds preferentially to spikes in noninfectious, immature flavivirions but is unable to bind significantly to mature virions, consistent with the limited solvent exposure of the epitope. We conclude that the neutralizing impact of E53 and likely similar fusion-loop-specific antibodies depends on its binding to the frequently observed immature component of flavivirus particles. Our results elucidate how fusion-loop antibodies, which comprise a significant fraction of the humoral response against flaviviruses, can function to control infection without appreciably recognizing mature virions. As these highly cross-reactive antibodies are often weakly neutralizing they also may contribute to antibody-dependent enhancement and flavi virus pathogenesis thereby complicating development of safe and effective vaccines.
Related JoVE Video
Structural comparison of different antibodies interacting with parvovirus capsids.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 A. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface. As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.
Related JoVE Video
Structural studies of the giant mimivirus.
PLoS Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Mimivirus is the largest known virus whose genome and physical size are comparable to some small bacteria, blurring the boundary between a virus and a cell. Structural studies of Mimivirus have been difficult because of its size and long surface fibers. Here we report the use of enzymatic digestions to remove the surface fibers of Mimivirus in order to expose the surface of the viral capsid. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and atomic force microscopy were able to show that the 20 icosahedral faces of Mimivirus capsids have hexagonal arrays of depressions. Each depression is surrounded by six trimeric capsomers that are similar in structure to those in many other large, icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses. Whereas in most viruses these capsomers are hexagonally close-packed with the same orientation in each face, in Mimivirus there are vacancies at the systematic depressions with neighboring capsomers differing in orientation by 60 degrees . The previously observed starfish-shaped feature is well-resolved and found to be on each virus particle and is associated with a special pentameric vertex. The arms of the starfish fit into the gaps between the five faces surrounding the unique vertex, acting as a seal. Furthermore, the enveloped nucleocapsid is accurately positioned and oriented within the capsid with a concave surface facing the unique vertex. Thus, the starfish-shaped feature and the organization of the nucleocapsid might regulate the delivery of the genome to the host. The structure of Mimivirus, as well as the various fiber components observed in the virus, suggests that the Mimivirus genome includes genes derived from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. The three-dimensional cryoEM reconstruction reported here is of a virus with a volume that is one order of magnitude larger than any previously reported molecular assembly studied at a resolution of equal to or better than 65 Angstroms.
Related JoVE Video
Crystallographic insights into the autocatalytic assembly mechanism of a bacteriophage tail spike.
Mol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The tailed bacteriophage phi29 has 12 "appendages" (gene product 12, gp12) attached to its neck region that participate in host cell recognition and entry. In the cell, monomeric gp12 undergoes proteolytic processing that releases the C-terminal domain during assembly into trimers. We report here crystal structures of the protein before and after catalytic processing and show that the C-terminal domain of gp12 is an "autochaperone" that aids trimerization. We also show that autocleavage of the C-terminal domain is a posttrimerization event that is followed by a unique ATP-dependent release. The posttranslationally modified N-terminal part has three domains that function to attach the appendages to the phage, digest the cell wall teichoic acids, and bind irreversibly to the host, respectively. Structural and sequence comparisons suggest that some eukaryotic and bacterial viruses as well as bacterial adhesins might have a similar maturation mechanism as is performed by phi29 gp12 for Bacillus subtilis.
Related JoVE Video
The structure of gene product 6 of bacteriophage T4, the hinge-pin of the baseplate.
Structure
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The baseplate of bacteriophage T4 is a multicomponent protein complex, which controls phage attachment to the host. It assembles from six wedges and a central hub. During infection the baseplate undergoes a large conformational change from a dome-shaped to a flat, star-shaped structure. We report the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of gene product (gp) 6 and investigate its motion with respect to the other proteins during the baseplate rearrangement. Six gp6 dimers interdigitate, forming a ring that maintains the integrity of the baseplate in both conformations. One baseplate wedge contains an N-terminal dimer of gp6, whereas neighboring wedges are tied together through the C-terminal dimer of gp6. The dimeric interactions are preserved throughout the rearrangement of the baseplate. However, the hinge angle between the N- and C-terminal parts of gp6 changes by approximately 15 degrees , accounting for a 10 A radial increase in the diameter of the gp6 ring.
Related JoVE Video
The capsid proteins of a large, icosahedral dsDNA virus.
J. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) is a large (approximately 1850 A diameter) insect virus with an icosahedral, T=147 capsid, a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome, and an internal lipid membrane. The structure of CIV was determined to 13 A resolution by means of cryoelectron microscopy (cryoEM) and three-dimensional image reconstruction. A homology model of P50, the CIV major capsid protein (MCP), was built based on its amino acid sequence and the structure of the homologous Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 Vp54 MCP. This model was fitted into the cryoEM density for each of the 25 trimeric CIV capsomers per icosahedral asymmetric unit. A difference map, in which the fitted CIV MCP capsomers were subtracted from the CIV cryoEM reconstruction, showed that there are at least three different types of minor capsid proteins associated with the capsomers outside the lipid membrane. "Finger" proteins are situated at many, but not all, of the spaces between three adjacent capsomers within each trisymmetron, and "zip" proteins are situated between sets of three adjacent capsomers at the boundary between neighboring trisymmetrons and pentasymmetrons. Based on the results of segmentation and density correlations, there are at least eight finger proteins and three dimeric and two monomeric zip proteins in one asymmetric unit of the CIV capsid. These minor proteins appear to stabilize the virus by acting as intercapsomer cross-links. One transmembrane "anchor" protein per icosahedral asymmetric unit, which extends from beneath one of the capsomers in the pentasymmetron to the internal leaflet of the lipid membrane, may provide additional stabilization for the capsid. These results are consistent with the observations for other large, icosahedral dsDNA viruses that also utilize minor capsid proteins for stabilization and for determining their assembly.
Related JoVE Video
Shared catalysis in virus entry and bacterial cell wall depolymerization.
J. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Bacterial virus entry and cell wall depolymerization require the breakdown of peptidoglycan (PG), the peptide-cross-linked polysaccharide matrix that surrounds bacterial cells. Structural studies of lysostaphin, a PG lytic enzyme (autolysin), have suggested that residues in the active site facilitate hydrolysis, but a clear mechanism for this reaction has remained unsolved. The active-site residues and a structural pattern of beta-sheets are conserved among lysostaphin homologs (such as LytM of Staphylococcus aureus) and the C-terminal domain of gene product 13 (gp13), a protein at the tail tip of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage varphi29. gp13 activity on PG and muropeptides was assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography, and gp13 was found to be a d,d-endopeptidase that cleaved the peptide cross-link. Computational modeling of the B. subtilis cross-linked peptide into the gp13 active site suggested that Asp195 may facilitate scissile-bond activation and that His247 is oriented to mediate nucleophile generation. To our knowledge, this is the first model of a Zn(2)(+) metallopeptidase and its substrate. Residue Asp195 of gp13 was found to be critical for Zn(2)(+) binding and catalysis by substitution mutagenesis with Ala or Cys. Circular dichroism and particle-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy showed that the general protein folding and Zn(2)(+) binding were maintained in the Cys mutant but reduced in the Ala mutant. These findings together support a model in which the Asp195 and His247 in gp13 and homologous residues in the LytM and lysostaphin active sites facilitate hydrolysis of the peptide substrate that cross-links PG. Thus, these autolysins and phage-entry enzymes have a shared chemical mechanism of action.
Related JoVE Video
The tail sheath structure of bacteriophage T4: a molecular machine for infecting bacteria.
EMBO J.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The contractile tail of bacteriophage T4 is a molecular machine that facilitates very high viral infection efficiency. Its major component is a tail sheath, which contracts during infection to less than half of its initial length. The sheath consists of 138 copies of the tail sheath protein, gene product (gp) 18, which surrounds the central non-contractile tail tube. The contraction of the sheath drives the tail tube through the outer membrane, creating a channel for the viral genome delivery. A crystal structure of about three quarters of gp18 has been determined and was fitted into cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the tail sheath before and after contraction. It was shown that during contraction, gp18 subunits slide over each other with no apparent change in their structure.
Related JoVE Video
Release of dengue virus genome induced by a peptide inhibitor.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Dengue virus infects approximately 100 million people annually, but there is no available therapeutic treatment. The mimetic peptide, DN59, consists of residues corresponding to the membrane interacting, amphipathic stem region of the dengue virus envelope (E) glycoprotein. This peptide is inhibitory to all four serotypes of dengue virus, as well as other flaviviruses. Cryo-electron microscopy image reconstruction of dengue virus particles incubated with DN59 showed that the virus particles were largely empty, concurrent with the formation of holes at the five-fold vertices. The release of RNA from the viral particle following incubation with DN59 was confirmed by increased sensitivity of the RNA genome to exogenous RNase and separation of the genome from the E protein in a tartrate density gradient. DN59 interacted strongly with synthetic lipid vesicles and caused membrane disruptions, but was found to be non-toxic to mammalian and insect cells. Thus DN59 inhibits flavivirus infectivity by interacting directly with virus particles resulting in release of the genomic RNA.
Related JoVE Video
Related giant viruses in distant locations and different habitats: Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus represents a third lineage of the Mimiviridae that is close to the megavirus lineage.
Genome Biol Evol
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The 1,021,348 base pair genome sequence of the Acanthamoeba polyphaga moumouvirus, a new member of the Mimiviridae family infecting Acanthamoeba polyphaga, is reported. The moumouvirus represents a third lineage beside mimivirus and megavirus. Thereby, it is a new member of the recently proposed Megavirales order. This giant virus was isolated from a cooling tower water in southeastern France but is most closely related to Megavirus chiliensis, which was isolated from ocean water off the coast of Chile. The moumouvirus is predicted to encode 930 proteins, of which 879 have detectable homologs. Among these predicted proteins, for 702 the closest homolog was detected in Megavirus chiliensis, with the median amino acid sequence identity of 62%. The evolutionary affinity of moumouvirus and megavirus was further supported by phylogenetic tree analysis of conserved genes. The moumouvirus and megavirus genomes share near perfect orthologous gene collinearity in the central part of the genome, with the variations concentrated in the terminal regions. In addition, genomic comparisons of the Mimiviridae reveal substantial gene loss in the moumouvirus lineage. The majority of the remaining moumouvirus proteins are most similar to homologs from other Mimiviridae members, and for 27 genes the closest homolog was found in bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes supported gene acquisition from diverse bacteria after the separation of the moumouvirus and megavirus lineages. Comparative genome analysis of the three lineages of the Mimiviridae revealed significant mobility of Group I self-splicing introns, with the highest intron content observed in the moumouvirus genome.
Related JoVE Video
Structure of Sputnik, a virophage, at 3.5-Å resolution.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
"Sputnik" is a dsDNA virus, referred to as a virophage, that is coassembled with Mimivirus in the host amoeba. We have used cryo-EM to produce an electron density map of the icosahedral Sputnik virus at 3.5-Å resolution, sufficient to verify the identity of most amino acids in the capsid proteins and to establish the identity of the pentameric protein forming the fivefold vertices. It was also shown that the virus lacks an internal membrane. The capsid is organized into a T = 27 lattice in which there are 260 trimeric capsomers and 12 pentameric capsomers. The trimeric capsomers consist of three double "jelly-roll" major capsid proteins creating pseudohexameric capsomer symmetry. The pentameric capsomers consist of five single jelly-roll proteins. The release of the genome by displacing one or more of the pentameric capsomers may be the result of a low-pH environment. These results suggest a mechanism of Sputnik DNA ejection that probably also occurs in other big icosahedral double jelly-roll viruses such as Adenovirus. In this study, the near-atomic resolution structure of a virus has been established where crystallization for X-ray crystallography was not feasible.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.