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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Functional proteomic analysis reveals the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2014
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KIAA1199 is a recently identified novel gene that is up-regulated in human cancer with poor survival. Our proteomic study on signaling polarity in chemotactic cells revealed KIAA1199 as a novel protein target that may be involved in cellular chemotaxis and motility. In the present study, we examined the functional significance of KIAA1199 expression in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness.
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Proteome analysis reveals roles of L-DOPA in response to oxidative stress in neurons.
BMC Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, caused by preferential dopaminergic neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra, a process also influenced by oxidative stress. L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) represents the main treatment route for motor symptoms associated with PD however, its exact mode of action remains unclear. A spectrum of conflicting data suggests that L-DOPA may damage dopaminergic neurons due to oxidative stress whilst other data suggest that L-DOPA itself may induce low levels of oxidative stress, which in turn stimulates endogenous antioxidant mechanisms and neuroprotection.
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The inducers 1,3-diaminopropane and spermidine cause the reprogramming of metabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum, leading to multiple vesicles and penicillin overproduction.
J Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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In this article we studied the differential protein abundance of Penicillium chrysogenum in response to either 1,3-diaminopropane (1,3-DAP) or spermidine, which behave as inducers of the penicillin production process. Proteins were resolved in 2-DE gels and identified by tandem MS spectrometry. Both inducers produced largely identical changes in the proteome, suggesting that they may be interconverted and act by the same mechanism. The addition of either 1,3-DAP or spermidine led to the overrepresentation of the last enzyme of the penicillin pathway, isopenicillin N acyltransferase (IAT). A modified form of the IAT protein was newly detected in the polyamine-supplemented cultures. Both inducers produced a rearrangement of the proteome resulting in an overrepresentation of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of valine and other precursors (e.g. coenzyme A) of penicillin. Interestingly, two enzymes of the homogentisate pathway involved in the degradation of phenylacetic acid (a well-known precursor of benzylpenicillin) were reduced following the addition of either of these two inducers, allowing an increase of the phenylacetic acid availability. Both inducers produced also an increase in the intracellular content of vesicles that derived to vacuoles in late stages and promoted sporulation of P. chrysogenum in solid medium.
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The Penicillium chrysogenum extracellular proteome. Conversion from a food-rotting strain to a versatile cell factory for white biotechnology.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 09-07-2010
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The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is well-known by its ability to synthesize ?-lactam antibiotics as well as other secondary metabolites. Like other filamentous fungi, this microorganism is an excellent host for secretion of extracellular proteins because of the high capacity of its protein secretion machinery. In this work, we have characterized the extracellular proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. This method allowed the correct identification of 279 spots by peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem MS. These 279 spots included 328 correctly identified proteins, which corresponded to 131 different proteins and their isoforms. One hundred and two proteins out of 131 were predicted to contain either classical or nonclassical secretion signal peptide sequences, providing evidence of the authentic extracellular location of these proteins. Proteins with higher representation in the extracellular proteome were those involved in plant cell wall degradation (polygalacturonase, pectate lyase, and glucan 1,3-?-glucosidase), utilization of nutrients (extracellular acid phosphatases and 6-hydroxy-d-nicotine oxidase), and stress response (catalase R). This filamentous fungus also secretes enzymes specially relevant for food industry, such as sulfydryl oxidase, dihydroxy-acid dehydratase, or glucoamylase. The identification of several antigens in the extracellular proteome also highlights the importance of this microorganism as one of the main indoor allergens. Comparison of the extracellular proteome among three strains of P. chrysogenum, the wild-type NRRL 1951, the Wis 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and the AS-P-78 (a penicillin high-producer), provided important insights to consider improved strains of this filamentous fungus as versatile cell-factories of interest, beyond antibiotic production, for other aspects of white biotechnology.
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Proteome analysis of the penicillin producer Penicillium chrysogenum: characterization of protein changes during the industrial strain improvement.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2010
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Proteomics is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms causing the production of high penicillin titers by industrial strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum as the result of strain improvement programs. Penicillin biosynthesis is an excellent model system for many other bioactive microbial metabolites. The recent publication of the P. chrysogenum genome has established the basis to understand the molecular processes underlying penicillin overproduction. We report here the proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 (the genome project reference strain) together with an in-depth study of the changes produced in three different strains of this filamentous fungus during industrial strain improvement. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, peptide mass fingerprinting, and tandem mass spectrometry were used for protein identification. Around 1000 spots were visualized by "blue silver" colloidal Coomassie staining in a non-linear pI range from 3 to 10 with high resolution, which allowed the identification of 950 proteins (549 different proteins and isoforms). Comparison among the cytosolic proteomes of the wild-type NRRL 1951, Wisconsin 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and AS-P-78 (a penicillin high producer) strains indicated that global metabolic reorganizations occurred during the strain improvement program. The main changes observed in the high producer strains were increases of cysteine biosynthesis (a penicillin precursor), enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, and stress response proteins together with a reduction in virulence and in the biosynthesis of other secondary metabolites different from penicillin (pigments and isoflavonoids). In the wild-type strain, we identified enzymes to utilize cellulose, sorbitol, and other carbon sources that have been lost in the high penicillin producer strains. Changes in the levels of a few specific proteins correlated well with the improved penicillin biosynthesis in the high producer strains. These results provide useful information to improve the production of many other bioactive secondary metabolites.
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Casein phosphopeptides drastically increase the secretion of extracellular proteins in Aspergillus awamori. Proteomics studies reveal changes in the secretory pathway.
Microb. Cell Fact.
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The secretion of heterologous animal proteins in filamentous fungi is usually limited by bottlenecks in the vesicle-mediated secretory pathway.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.