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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Identification of lymphoma predictors in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.
Rheumatol. Int.
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2014
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To identify risk and predictors of lymphoma or lymphoproliferative disease in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. Articles were identified through a comprehensive search strategy in Medline, Embase and Cochrane CENTRAL. Studies had to investigate primary Sjögren syndrome patients, 18 years of age or older, with the goal of examining potential clinical, immunological and hematological risk factors for lymphoma or lymphoproliferative disease. The quality of the studies was graded using the Oxford Levels of Evidence Scale. Whenever possible, the authors created evidence tables and performed meta-analysis. Of 900 studies identified, 18 were selected for inclusion. These studies provided data from over 15,000 patients (90 % female) for analysis. Lymphadenopathy, parotid enlargement, palpable purpura, low C4 serum levels and cryoglobulins were the most consistent non-Hodgkin´s lymphoma/lymphoproliferative disease predictors. Additionally, some of the studies identified splenomegaly, low C3 serum levels, lymphopenia and neutropenia as significant prognostic factors. The detection of germinal center-like lesions in primary Sjögren Syndrome diagnostic salivary biopsies was also proposed as highly predictive of non-Hodgkin´s lymphoma. In contrast, anemia, anti-Ro, anti-La, antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, male gender and hypergammaglobulinemia were not associated with lymphoma or lymphoproliferative disease. Patients with primary Sjögren syndrome have an increased risk of lymphoma or lymphoproliferative disease compared to the general population. Ascertaining relevant and reliable predictors in this patient population would greatly facilitate the identification of patients at elevated risk for closer monitoring in the context of limited resources.
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The systemic lupus erythematosus IRF5 risk haplotype is associated with systemic sclerosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a fibrotic autoimmune disease in which the genetic component plays an important role. One of the strongest SSc association signals outside the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region corresponds to interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a major regulator of the type I IFN pathway. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether three different haplotypic blocks within this locus, which have been shown to alter the protein function influencing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, are involved in SSc susceptibility and clinical phenotypes. For that purpose, we genotyped one representative single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of each block (rs10488631, rs2004640, and rs4728142) in a total of 3,361 SSc patients and 4,012 unaffected controls of Caucasian origin from Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, Italy and United Kingdom. A meta-analysis of the allele frequencies was performed to analyse the overall effect of these IRF5 genetic variants on SSc. Allelic combination and dependency tests were also carried out. The three SNPs showed strong associations with the global disease (rs4728142: P ?=?1.34×10(-8), OR ?=?1.22, CI 95% ?=?1.14-1.30; rs2004640: P ?=?4.60×10(-7), OR ?=?0.84, CI 95% ?=?0.78-0.90; rs10488631: P ?=?7.53×10(-20), OR ?=?1.63, CI 95% ?=?1.47-1.81). However, the association of rs2004640 with SSc was not independent of rs4728142 (conditioned P ?=?0.598). The haplotype containing the risk alleles (rs4728142*A-rs2004640*T-rs10488631*C: P ?=?9.04×10(-22), OR ?=?1.75, CI 95% ?=?1.56-1.97) better explained the observed association (likelihood P-value ?=?1.48×10(-4)), suggesting an additive effect of the three haplotypic blocks. No statistical significance was observed in the comparisons amongst SSc patients with and without the main clinical characteristics. Our data clearly indicate that the SLE risk haplotype also influences SSc predisposition, and that this association is not sub-phenotype-specific.
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A GWAS follow-up study reveals the association of the IL12RB2 gene with systemic sclerosis in Caucasian populations.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the IL12RB2 locus showed a suggestive association signal in a previously published genome-wide association study (GWAS) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Aiming to reveal the possible implication of the IL12RB2 gene in SSc, we conducted a follow-up study of this locus in different Caucasian cohorts. We analyzed 10 GWAS-genotyped SNPs in the IL12RB2 region (2309 SSc patients and 5161 controls). We then selected three SNPs (rs3790567, rs3790566 and rs924080) based on their significance level in the GWAS, for follow-up in an independent European cohort comprising 3344 SSc and 3848 controls. The most-associated SNP (rs3790567) was further tested in an independent cohort comprising 597 SSc patients and 1139 controls from the USA. After conditional logistic regression analysis of the GWAS data, we selected rs3790567 [P(MH)= 1.92 × 10(-5) odds ratio (OR) = 1.19] as the genetic variant with the firmest independent association observed in the analyzed GWAS peak of association. After the first follow-up phase, only the association of rs3790567 was consistent (P(MH)= 4.84 × 10(-3) OR = 1.12). The second follow-up phase confirmed this finding (P(?2) = 2.82 × 10(-4) OR = 1.34). After performing overall pooled-analysis of all the cohorts included in the present study, the association found for the rs3790567 SNP in the IL12RB2 gene region reached GWAS-level significant association (P(MH)= 2.82 × 10(-9) OR = 1.17). Our data clearly support the IL12RB2 genetic association with SSc, and suggest a relevant role of the interleukin 12 signaling pathway in SSc pathogenesis.
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Novel identification of the IRF7 region as an anticentromere autoantibody propensity locus in systemic sclerosis.
Ann. Rheum. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2011
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Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are related chronic autoimmune diseases of complex aetiology in which the interferon (IFN) pathway plays a key role. Recent studies have reported an association between IRF7 and SLE which confers a risk to autoantibody production. A study was undertaken to investigate whether the IRF7 genomic region is also involved in susceptibility to SSc and the main clinical features.
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[Etiologic treatment of sicca syndrome. What can the rheumatologist offer?].
Reumatol Clin
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2010
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No effective treatment has been documented for the glandular primary Sjögren syndrome (PSS) despite the development of oral and biologic agents that have significant activity against other autoimmune disorders. Some disease-modifying agents have been empirically evaluated for the treatment of PSS. Targeting B cells also seems very promising in SSP because of the B-cell hyperactivity recognized in this desease. This article reviews existing data on the use of disease-modifying therapy for glandular of SSP. To date, published studies and trials of oral DMARDs for the treatment of SSP have shown disappointing results. B-cell modulation is clearly a promising therapy for PSS. Many challenges in trial design and execution are evident from the studies reviewed.
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[Slow onset septic arthritis by Scedosporium apiospermum after periarticular infiltration].
Rev Iberoam Micol
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Fungal arthritis is usually of haematogenous origin, and mainly affects patients with impaired cellular immunity or users of intravenous drugs. The infection in immunocompetent patients is generally caused by direct inoculation of the microorganism through an invasive device. The experience of azole therapy in these patients is limited.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.