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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Our experience with unusual gastrointestinal tract duplications in infants.
Afr J Paediatr Surg
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2014
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Classical duplications may present along any part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) from mouth to anus. Atypical or unusual rare varieties of GIT duplications may also occur, but with different anatomical features.
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Determining the Electronic Performance Limitations in Top-Down-Fabricated Si Nanowires with Mean Widths Down to 4 nm.
Nano Lett.
PUBLISHED: 10-13-2014
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Silicon nanowires have been patterned with mean widths down to 4 nm using top-down lithography and dry etching. Performance-limiting scattering processes have been measured directly which provide new insight into the electronic conduction mechanisms within the nanowires. Results demonstrate a transition from 3-dimensional (3D) to 2D and then 1D as the nanowire mean widths are reduced from 12 to 4 nm. The importance of high quality surface passivation is demonstrated by a lack of significant donor deactivation, resulting in neutral impurity scattering ultimately limiting the electronic performance. The results indicate the important parameters requiring optimization when fabricating nanowires with atomic dimensions.
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Design and fabrication of memory devices based on nanoscale polyoxometalate clusters.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2014
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Flash memory devices-that is, non-volatile computer storage media that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed-are vital for portable electronics, but the scaling down of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) flash memory to sizes of below ten nanometres per data cell presents challenges. Molecules have been proposed to replace MOS flash memory, but they suffer from low electrical conductivity, high resistance, low device yield, and finite thermal stability, limiting their integration into current MOS technologies. Although great advances have been made in the pursuit of molecule-based flash memory, there are a number of significant barriers to the realization of devices using conventional MOS technologies. Here we show that core-shell polyoxometalate (POM) molecules can act as candidate storage nodes for MOS flash memory. Realistic, industry-standard device simulations validate our approach at the nanometre scale, where the device performance is determined mainly by the number of molecules in the storage media and not by their position. To exploit the nature of the core-shell POM clusters, we show, at both the molecular and device level, that embedding [(Se(iv)O3)2](4-) as an oxidizable dopant in the cluster core allows the oxidation of the molecule to a [Se(v)2O6](2-) moiety containing a {Se(v)-Se(v)} bond (where curly brackets indicate a moiety, not a molecule) and reveals a new 5+ oxidation state for selenium. This new oxidation state can be observed at the device level, resulting in a new type of memory, which we call 'write-once-erase'. Taken together, these results show that POMs have the potential to be used as a realistic nanoscale flash memory. Also, the configuration of the doped POM core may lead to new types of electrical behaviour. This work suggests a route to the practical integration of configurable molecules in MOS technologies as the lithographic scales approach the molecular limit.
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Adsorption optimization of lead (II) using Saccharum bengalense as a non-conventional low cost biosorbent: isotherm and thermodynamics modeling.
Int J Phytoremediation
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2014
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In the present study a novel biomass, derived from the pulp of Saccharum bengalense, was used as an adsorbent material for the removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solution. After 50 minutes contact time, almost 92% lead removal was possible at pH 6.0 under batch test conditions. The experimental data was analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Timken and Dubinin-Radushkevich two parameters isotherm model, three parameters Redlich-Peterson, Sip and Toth models and four parameters Fritz Schlunder isotherm models. Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Fritz-Schlunder models were found to be the best fit models. Kinetic studies revealed that the sorption process was well explained with pseudo second-order kinetic model Thermodynamic parameters including free energy change (AG degrees), enthalpy change (AH degrees) and entropy change (AS degrees) have been calculated and reveal the spontaneous, endothermic and feasible nature of the adsorption process. The thermodynamic parameters of activation (deltaG(#), deltaH(#) and deltaS(#)) were calculated from the pseudo-second order rate constant by using the Eyring equation. Results showed that Pb (II) adsorption onto SB is an associated mechanism and the reorientation step is entropy controlled.
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Loss of caveolin-1 and adiponectin induces severe inflammatory lung injury following LPS challenge through excessive oxidative/nitrative stress.
Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell Mol. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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Excessive reactive oxygen/nitrogen species have been associated with the onset, progression, and outcome of sepsis, both in preclinical and clinical studies. However, the signaling pathways regulating oxidative/nitrative stress in the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are not fully understood. Employing the novel mouse model with genetic deletions of both caveolin-1 (Cav1) and adiponectin (ADPN) [double knockout (DKO) mice], we have demonstrated the critical role of Cav1 and ADPN signaling cross talk in regulating oxidative/nitrative stress and resulting inflammatory lung injury following LPS challenge. In contrast to the inhibited inflammatory lung injury in Cav1(-/-) mice, we observed severe lung inflammation and markedly increased lung vascular permeability in DKO mice in response to LPS challenge. Accordingly, the DKO mice exhibited an 80% mortality rate following a sublethal dose of LPS challenge. At basal state, loss of Cav1 and ADPN resulted in a drastic increase of oxidative stress and resultant nitrative stress in DKO lungs. Scavenging of superoxide by pretreating the DKO mice with MnTMPYP (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) restored the inflammatory responses to LPS challenge including reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity and vascular permeability. Thus oxidative/nitrative stress collectively modulated by Cav1 and ADPN signalings is a critical determinant of inflammatory lung injury in response to LPS challenge.
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Library services and user satisfaction in developing countries: a case study.
Health Info Libr J
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2013
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Punjab Institute of Cardiology (PIC) is a recognised teaching hospital for cardiac care in the Punjab province of Pakistan. PIC has established a library to fulfil the research and information needs of health care professionals. This study aims to evaluate the satisfaction of users with the services of PIC library.
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MitProt-Pred: Predicting mitochondrial proteins of Plasmodium falciparum parasite using diverse physiochemical properties and ensemble classification.
Comput. Biol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2013
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Mitochondrial protein of Plasmodium falciparum is an important target for anti-malarial drugs. Experimental approaches for detecting mitochondrial proteins are costly and time consuming. Therefore, MitProt-Pred is developed that utilizes Bi-profile Bayes, Pseudo Average Chemical Shift, Split Amino Acid Composition, and Pseudo Amino Acid Composition based features of the protein sequences. Hybrid feature space is also developed by combining different individual feature spaces. These feature spaces are learned and exploited through SVM based ensemble. MitProt-Pred achieved significantly improved prediction performance for two standard datasets. We also developed the score level ensemble, which outperforms the feature level ensemble.
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Predicting G-protein-coupled receptors families using different physiochemical properties and pseudo amino acid composition.
Meth. Enzymol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2013
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G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiate signaling pathways via trimetric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. GPCRs are classified based on their ligand-binding properties and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Nonetheless, these later analyses are in most case dependent on multiple sequence alignments, themselves dependent on human intervention and expertise. Alignment-free classifications of GPCR sequences, in addition to being unbiased, present many applications uncovering hidden physicochemical parameters shared among specific groups of receptors, to being used in automated workflows for large-scale molecular modeling applications. Current alignment-free classification methods, however, do not reach a full accuracy. This chapter discusses how GPCRs amino acid sequences can be classified using pseudo amino acid composition and multiscale energy representation of different physiochemical properties of amino acids. A hybrid feature extraction strategy is shown to be suitable to represent GPCRs and to be able to exploit GPCR amino acid sequence discrimination capability in spatial as well as transform domain. Classification strategies such as support vector machine and probabilistic neural network are then discussed in regards to GPCRs classification. The work of GPCR-Hybrid web predictor is also discussed.
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Inoculum pretreatment affects bacterial survival, activity and catabolic gene expression during phytoremediation of diesel contaminated soil.
Chemosphere
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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Plant-bacteria partnership is a promising approach for remediating soil contaminated with organic pollutants. The colonization and metabolic activity of an inoculated microorganism depend not only on environmental conditions but also on the physiological condition of the applied microorganisms. This study assessed the influence of different inoculum pretreatments on survival, gene abundance and catabolic gene expression of an applied strain (Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79) in the rhizosphere of ryegrass vegetated in diesel contaminated soil. Maximum bacterium survival, gene abundance and expression were observed in the soil inoculated with bacterial cells that had been pregrown on complex medium, and hydrocarbon degradation and genotoxicity reduction were also high in this soil. These findings propose that use of complex media for growing plant inocula may enhance bacterial survival and colonization and subsequently the efficiency of pollutant degradation.
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FoxM1 regulates re-annealing of endothelial adherens junctions through transcriptional control of beta-catenin expression.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2010
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Repair of the injured vascular intima requires a series of coordinated events that mediate both endothelial regeneration and reannealing of adherens junctions (AJs) to form a restrictive endothelial barrier. The forkhead transcription factor FoxM1 is essential for endothelial proliferation after vascular injury. However, little is known about mechanisms by which FoxM1 regulates endothelial barrier reannealing. Here, using a mouse model with endothelial cell (EC)-restricted disruption of FoxM1 (FoxM1 CKO) and primary cultures of ECs with small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of FoxM1, we demonstrate a novel requisite role of FoxM1 in mediating endothelial AJ barrier repair through the transcriptional control of beta-catenin. In the FoxM1 CKO lung vasculature, we observed persistent microvessel leakage characterized by impaired reannealing of endothelial AJs after endothelial injury. We also showed that FoxM1 directly regulated beta-catenin transcription and that reexpression of beta-catenin rescued the defective AJ barrier-reannealing phenotype of FoxM1-deficient ECs. Knockdown of beta-catenin mimicked the phenotype of defective barrier recovery seen in FoxM1-deficient ECs. These data demonstrate that FoxM1 is required for reannealing of endothelial AJs in order to form a restrictive endothelial barrier through transcriptional control of beta-catenin expression. Therefore, means of activating FoxM1-mediated endothelial repair represent a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammatory vascular diseases associated with persistent vascular barrier leakiness such as acute lung injury.
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Does race affect outcomes in triple negative breast cancer?
Breast Cancer (Auckl)
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2010
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There is discordance among studies assessing the impact of race on outcome of patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC). We assessed survival outcomes for African American (AA) versus Caucasian (CA) women with TNBC treated at an urban cancer center in Memphis, TN with a predominant AA patient population.
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Caveolin-1 deficiency dampens Toll-like receptor 4 signaling through eNOS activation.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2010
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Caveolin-1 (Cav1), the scaffolding protein of caveolae, has been shown to play an important role in host defense and inflammation. However, the underlying molecular basis for these actions remains elusive. Here, using double mutant mice with genetic deletions of Cav1 and NOS3, we show that chronic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation secondary to loss of Cav1 serves a crucial immunomodulatory function through tyrosine nitration-mediated impairment of interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase (IRAK)4, a signaling component required for nuclear factor-kappaB activation and innate immunity. We observed an eNOS-dependent decrease in the plasma concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and marked improvement of survival in Cav1(-/-) mice following lipopolysaccharide challenge. Activation of eNOS secondary to loss of Cav1 resulted in decreased activation of nuclear factor-kappaB in response to lipopolysaccharide challenge, and thereby protected the animals from lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. IRAK4 was prominently nitrated in Cav1-deficient endothelial cells, whereas eNOS deletion in Cav1-deficient endothelial cells resulted in marked decrease of IRAK4 nitration and restored the inflammatory response after lipopolysaccharide challenge. Furthermore, in vitro nitration of IRAK4 resulted in impairment of the kinase activity. Thus, eNOS activation secondary to loss of Cav1 signals dampening of the innate immune response to lipopolysaccharide through IRAK4 nitration and the resultant impairment of kinase activity, and consequently mitigates inflammatory lung injury.
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MEKC determination of vanadium from mineral ore and crude petroleum oil samples using precapillary chelation with bis(salicylaldehyde)tetramethyl-ethylenediimine.
J Sep Sci
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2009
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An analytical procedure has been developed for the separation of Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Fe(II), Pd(II), Th(IV), V(IV), and determination of Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and V(IV) by MEKC after chelation with bis(salicylaldehyde)tetramethylethylenediimine (H(2)SA(2)Ten). Uncoated fused silica capillary was used with an applied voltage of 30 kV with photo-diode array detection at 228 nm. SDS was added as micellar medium at pH 8.2 with sodium tetraborate buffer (0.1 M). Linear calibrations were established within 0.015-1000 microg/mL of each element with LOD within 5-67 ng/mL. The method was applied for the determination of vanadium from crude oil and ore samples in the range 0.34-2.40 and 114.2-720.7 microg/g with RSD 1.7-3.8 and 0.98-2.30% (n = 3), respectively. Fe, Ni, and Co present in crude oil and ore samples were also determined with RSD 1.3-2.8, 1.1-4.1, and 1.2-3.5% (n = 3), respectively. The results were compared with that of suppliers specifications and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Method was evaluated by standard addition technique.
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Vision and quality in the digital imaging environment: how much does the visual acuity of radiologists vary at an intermediate distance?
AJR Am J Roentgenol
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2009
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The purpose of this study was to examine the intermediate-distance visual acuity of a cross section of radiologists and to identify variation in visual acuity during a typical workday.
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Persistent eNOS activation secondary to caveolin-1 deficiency induces pulmonary hypertension in mice and humans through PKG nitration.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2009
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Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an unremitting disease defined by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right-sided heart failure. Using mice with genetic deletions of caveolin 1 (Cav1) and eNOS (Nos3), we demonstrate here that chronic eNOS activation secondary to loss of caveolin-1 can lead to PH. Consistent with a role for eNOS in the pathogenesis of PH, the pulmonary vascular remodeling and PH phenotype of Cav1-/- mice were absent in Cav1-/-Nos3-/- mice. Further, treatment of Cav1-/- mice with either MnTMPyP (a superoxide scavenger) or l-NAME (a NOS inhibitor) reversed their pulmonary vascular pathology and PH phenotype. Activation of eNOS in Cav1-/- lungs led to the impairment of PKG activity through tyrosine nitration. Moreover, the PH phenotype in Cav1-/- lungs could be rescued by overexpression of PKG-1. The clinical relevance of the data was indicated by the observation that lung tissue from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension demonstrated increased eNOS activation and PKG nitration and reduced caveolin-1 expression. Together, these data show that loss of caveolin-1 leads to hyperactive eNOS and subsequent tyrosine nitration-dependent impairment of PKG activity, which results in PH. Thus, targeting of PKG nitration represents a potential novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PH.
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Large bowel obstruction in pregnancy: a rare entity, an unusual cause.
Arch. Gynecol. Obstet.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2009
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Large bowel obstruction is a rare and difficult diagnosis in pregnancy. Common causes are caecal and sigmoid volvulus and less common pseudo-obstruction. An infrequent cause of large bowel obstruction from an adhesive band in pregnancy causing diagnostic difficulty is reported.
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Biosorption potentials of a novel green biosorbent Saccharum bengalense containing cellulose as carbohydrate polymer for removal of Ni (II) ions from aqueous solutions.
Int. J. Biol. Macromol.
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In this research work, the potential of a novel green material obtained from Saccharum bengalense (SB) plant was investigated for the removal of Ni (II) ions from aqueous solution. Biomaterial SB composed of cellulose macromolecules and was used without any chemical treatment. Batch experiments were performed by considering the effect of contact time, SB concentration, pH of the solution and temperature. Results revealed that ?87% of Ni was removed from aqueous solution at optimum conditions. Three typical kinetic models namely, pseudo first order, pseudo second order and Elovich equations were applied to interpret the kinetic data. To investigate the rate determining step, the intra-particle diffusion model was applied on the experimental data. The sorption process was well explained with pseudo second-order kinetic model. Adsorption isothermal data was examined by applying classical two parameters (Langmuir, Freundlich, Timken and Dubinin-Radushkevich) and three parameters (Redlich-Peterson, Toth and Sips models) and four parameters Fritz Schlunder Isotherm models. Based on R(2) and ?(2) the equilibrium sorption data was better fitted to Langmuir and Sips isotherm model than any other model. Thermodynamics parameters such as free energy change (?G°), enthalpy change (?H°) and entropy change (?S°) have been calculated respectively, which revealed the spontaneous, endothermic and feasible nature of adsorption process. The results of the present investigation suggest that S. bengalense can be used as an environmentally benign and low cost biomaterial for nickel removal from aqueous solution.
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Protein kinase G-I deficiency induces pulmonary hypertension through Rho A/Rho kinase activation.
Am. J. Pathol.
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Protein kinase G (PKG) plays an important role in the regulation of vascular smooth cell contractility and is a critical mediator of nitric oxide signaling, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. PKG-I-knockout (Prkg1(-/-)) mice exhibit impaired nitric oxide/cGMP-dependent vasorelaxation and systemic hypertension. However, it remains unknown whether PKG-I deficiency induces pulmonary hypertension. In this study, we characterized the hypertensive pulmonary phenotypes in Prkg1(-/-) mice and delineated the underlying molecular basis. We observed a significant increase in right ventricular systolic pressure in Prkg1(-/-) mice in the absence of systemic hypertension and left-sided heart dysfunction. In addition, we observed marked muscularization of distal pulmonary vessels in Prkg1(-/-) mice. Microangiography revealed impaired integrity of the pulmonary vasculature in Prkg1(-/-) mice. Mechanistically, PKG-I-mediated phosphorylation of Rho A Ser188 was markedly decreased, and the resultant Rho A activation was significantly increased in Prkg1(-/-) lung tissues, which resulted in Rho kinase activation. The i.t. administration of fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, reversed the hypertensive pulmonary phenotype in Prkg1(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data show that PKG-I deficiency induces pulmonary hypertension through Rho A/Rho kinase activation-mediated vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodeling.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.