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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Sex differences in outcome and associations with neonatal brain morphology in extremely preterm children.
J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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To investigate sex differences in neurologic and developmental outcomes in extremely preterm (EPT) children and explore associations with neonatal brain morphology.
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Brain Growth Gains and Losses in Extremely Preterm Infants at Term.
Cereb. Cortex
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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Premature exposure to the extrauterine environment negatively affects the brains' developmental trajectory. Our aim was to determine whether extremely preterm (EPT) infants, with no evidence of focal brain lesions, show morphological brain differences when compared with term-born infants. Additionally, we investigated associations between perinatal factors and neuroanatomical alterations. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging was acquired at term-equivalent age (TEA) from 47 EPT infants born before 27 weeks of gestation, and 15 healthy, term-born controls. Automatic segmentation and voxel-based morphometry-Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration through Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) were used. Compared with controls, EPT infants displayed global reductions in cortical and subcortical gray matter, brainstem, and an increased cerebrospinal fluid volume. Regionally, they showed decreased volumes of all brain tissues, in particular cortical gray matter. Increased volumes of cortical gray and white matter were observed in regions involved in visual processing. Increasing prematurity, intraventricular hemorrhage grade I-II, and patent ductus arteriosus ligation were associated with decreased volumes and had a particular effect on the cerebellum. Concluding, EPT infants without focal brain lesions had an altered brain growth at TEA that particularly affected the gray matter, and varied when it came to the presence of perinatal risk factors. Brain growth gains in EPT infants may be related to a longer extrauterine experience.
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Differential vulnerability of gray matter and white matter to intrauterine growth restriction in preterm infants at 12 months corrected age.
Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2013
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Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with a high risk of abnormal neurodevelopment. Underlying neuroanatomical substrates are partially documented. We hypothesized that at 12 months preterm infants would evidence specific white-matter microstructure alterations and gray-matter differences induced by severe IUGR. Twenty preterm infants with IUGR (26-34 weeks of gestation) were compared with 20 term-born infants and 20 appropriate for gestational age preterm infants of similar gestational age. Preterm groups showed no evidence of brain abnormalities. At 12 months, infants were scanned sleeping naturally. Gray-matter volumes were studied with voxel-based morphometry. White-matter microstructure was examined using tract-based spatial statistics. The relationship between diffusivity indices in white matter, gray matter volumes, and perinatal data was also investigated. Gray-matter decrements attributable to IUGR comprised amygdala, basal ganglia, thalamus and insula bilaterally, left occipital and parietal lobes, and right perirolandic area. Gray-matter volumes positively correlated with birth weight exclusively. Preterm infants had reduced FA in the corpus callosum, and increased FA in the anterior corona radiata. Additionally, IUGR infants had increased FA in the forceps minor, internal and external capsules, uncinate and fronto-occipital white matter tracts. Increased axial diffusivity was observed in several white matter tracts. Fractional anisotropy positively correlated with birth weight and gestational age at birth. These data suggest that IUGR differentially affects gray and white matter development preferentially affecting gray matter. At 12 months IUGR is associated with a specific set of structural gray-matter decrements. White matter follows an unusual developmental pattern, and is apparently affected by IUGR and prematurity combined.
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Identifying the cortical substrates of interictal epileptiform activity in patients with extratemporal epilepsy: An EEG-fMRI sequential analysis and FDG-PET study.
Epilepsia
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2013
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The aim of this study was to apply sequential analysis of electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) data to study the cortical substrates related to the generation of the interictal epileptiform activity (IEA) in patients with pharmacoresistant extratemporal epilepsy.
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Automatic quantitative MRI texture analysis in small-for-gestational-age fetuses discriminates abnormal neonatal neurobehavior.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We tested the hypothesis whether texture analysis (TA) from MR images could identify patterns associated with an abnormal neurobehavior in small for gestational age (SGA) neonates.
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Differential effects of intrauterine growth restriction on brain structure and development in preterm infants: a magnetic resonance imaging study.
Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2011
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Previous evidence suggests that preterm newborns with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) have specific neurostructural and neurodevelopmental anomalies, but it is unknown whether these effects persist in early childhood. We studied a sample of 18 preterm IUGR, 15 preterm AGA - born between 26 and 34 weeks of gestational age (GA) - and 15 healthy born-term infants. Infants were scanned at 12 months corrected age (CA), in a 3T scanner, without sedation. Analyses were made by automated lobar volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed in all subjects at 18 months CA with the Bayley Scale for Infant and Toddler Development, third edition. IUGR infants had reduced relative volumes for the insular and temporal lobes. According to VBM, IUGR infants had bilateral reduced gray matter (GM) in the temporal, parietal, frontal, and insular regions compared with the other groups. IUGR infants had increased white matter (WM) in temporal regions compared to the AGA group and in frontal, parietal, occipital, and insular regions compared to the term group. They also showed decreased WM in the cerebellum and a non-significant trend in the hippocampus compared to term infants. IUGR infants had reduced neurodevelopmental scores, which were positively correlated with GM in various regions. These data suggest that the IUGR induces a distinct brain pattern of structural changes that persist at 1 year of life and are associated with specific developmental difficulties.
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Twelve-month neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants with and without intrauterine growth restriction.
Acta Paediatr.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2010
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To evaluate the neurodevelopmental outcome at 12 months corrected age in preterm infants with and without severe intrauterine growth restriction.
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Fractal-dimension analysis detects cerebral changes in preterm infants with and without intrauterine growth restriction.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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In the search for a useful parameter to detect and quantify subtle brain abnormalities in infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), we hypothesised that the analysis of the structural complexity of grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) using the fractal dimension (FD), a measurement of the topological complexity of an object, could be established as a useful tool for quantitative studies of infant brain morphology. We studied a sample of 18 singleton IUGR premature infants, (12.72 months corrected age (CA), range: 12 months-14 months), 15 preterm infants matched one-to-one for gestational age (GA) at delivery (12.6 months; range: 12 months-14 months), and 15 neonates born at term (12.4 months; range: 11 months-14 months). The neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed in all subjects at 18 months CA according to the Bayley Scale for Infant and Toddler Development - Third edition (BSID-III). For MRI acquisition and processing, the infants were scanned at 12 months CA, in a TIM TRIO 3T scanner, sleeping naturally. Images were pre-processed using the SPM5 toolbox, the GM and WM segmented under the VBM5 toolbox, and the box-counting method was applied for FD calculation of normal and skeletonized segmented images. The results showed a significant decrease of the FD of the brain GM and WM in the IUGR group when compared to the preterm or at-term controls. We also identified a significant linear tendency of both GM and WM FD from IUGR to preterm and term groups. Finally, multiple linear analyses between the FD of the GM or WM and the neurodevelopmental scales showed a significant regression of the language and motor scales with the FD of the GM. In conclusion, a decreased FD of the GM and WM in IUGR infants could be a sensitive indicator for the investigation of structural brain abnormalities in the IUGR population at 12 months of age, which can also be related to functional disorders.
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Decreased regional brain volume and cognitive impairment in preterm children at low risk.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 12-02-2009
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To investigate whether preterm children with low risk for neurodevelopmental deficits show long-term changes in gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes compared with term children and to relate these changes to cognitive outcome.
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Neurobehavior in term, small-for-gestational age infants with normal placental function.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2009
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The goal was to evaluate the neurobehavioral outcomes of term, small-for-gestational age (SGA) newborns with normal placental function.
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Magnetic resonance imaging study of cerebral sulci in low-risk preterm children.
Int. J. Dev. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2009
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Premature birth is associated with several brain dysfunctions including changes in the normal pattern of sulcal development. Previous studies on sulcal abnormalities were performed in subjects with perinatal brain complications. We selected a sample of preterm subjects with a low risk of neurodevelopmental abnormalities with the aim of investigating the effects of prematurity per se. Surface and maximum depth measures of four sulci that develop at different gestational ages were obtained using Anatomist/Brain Visa 3.0.2 software. The sulci measured were the olfactory sulcus (16 weeks), the parieto-occipital sulcus (22-23 weeks), the superior temporal sulcus (32 weeks) and the orbitofrontal sulcus (36-39 weeks). The sample comprised 17 low-risk preterms (mean gestational age: 32 weeks) and 16 full-term children who were matched for age at scan, gender, handedness and socio-cultural status. Analysis of surface variance showed a significant group effect (P<0.015), as well as an interaction between the type of sulcus and group (P<0.001). The superior temporal sulcus surface was inferior in the low-risk preterm group compared to controls. Our findings suggest that even without perinatal complications, premature birth affects sulcal morphology.
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Quantitative tissue echogenicity of the neonatal brain assessed by ultrasound imaging.
Ultrasound Med Biol
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2009
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The aim of this study was to propose a method for measuring the echogenicity of several neonatal brain structures for quantitative interpretation of ultrasound images. To do this, 40 preterm neonates (24-34 weeks gestation) with adequate birth weight for gestational age were studied. On the third day after delivery, anterior fontanelle ultrasound imaging of the brain was performed in standard coronal and sagittal views. Four regions-of-interest (ROIs) were identified: periventricular, choroid plexus, cerebellar vermis and basal ganglia. Two consecutive images from each ROI were digitally stored. For off-line analysis, the ROI corresponding to each structure was delineated and the mean pixel brightness (PB) calculated. In addition, the brightness of bone tissue obtained at the same depth of the studied ROI was calculated. This value was considered as the maximum possible echogenicity for that individual image. The relative echogenicity (RE) was then calculated as: PB ROI/PB BONE( *)100. Differences in RE between the ROIs and RE variations according to gestational age and reliability reproducibility were determined. We found that among the studied structures, RE values (mean/SD) were significantly higher in the choroid plexus (mean [SD] 56.38 [6.0] and in the cerebellar vermis 51.20 [6.0] than in the basal ganglia 37.29 [5.7] and the periventricular area 37.04 [5.6]) (p<0.05). These values showed no variation in relation to gestational age at birth. Interobserver reproducibility was 0.91 in the choroid plexus, 0.89 in the cerebellar vermis, 0.82 in basal ganglia and 0.77 in the anterior periventricular area. In conclusion, semiquantitative estimation of RE offers a reproducible method for evaluating at-risk areas of the neonatal brain.
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Cerebral blood perfusion and neurobehavioral performance in full-term small-for-gestational-age fetuses.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2009
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in cerebral blood perfusion and middle cerebral artery (MCA) Doppler in full-term small-for-gestational-age fetuses (SGA) and to explore their association with neonatal neurobehavioral performance.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.