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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
SeqControl: process control for DNA sequencing.
Nat. Methods
PUBLISHED: 08-31-2014
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As high-throughput sequencing continues to increase in speed and throughput, routine clinical and industrial application draws closer. These 'production' settings will require enhanced quality monitoring and quality control to optimize output and reduce costs. We developed SeqControl, a framework for predicting sequencing quality and coverage using a set of 15 metrics describing overall coverage, coverage distribution, basewise coverage and basewise quality. Using whole-genome sequences of 27 prostate cancers and 26 normal references, we derived multivariate models that predict sequencing quality and depth. SeqControl robustly predicted how much sequencing was required to reach a given coverage depth (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.993), accurately classified clinically relevant formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, and made predictions from as little as one-eighth of a sequencing lane (AUC = 0.967). These techniques can be immediately incorporated into existing sequencing pipelines to monitor data quality in real time. SeqControl is available at http://labs.oicr.on.ca/Boutros-lab/software/SeqControl/.
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Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate: interobserver reproducibility survey of 39 urologic pathologists.
Ann Diagn Pathol
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2014
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The diagnosis of intraductal carcinoma (IDC) of the prostate remains subjective because 3 sets of diagnostic criteria are in use. An internet survey was compiled from 38 photomicrographs showing duct proliferations: 14 signed out as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), 17 IDC, and 7 invasive cribriform/ductal carcinoma. Each image was assessed for the presence of 9 histologic criteria ascribed to IDC. Thirty-nine respondents were asked to rate images as (1) benign/reactive, (2) HGPIN, (3) borderline between HGPIN and IDC, (4) IDC, or (5) invasive cribriform/ductal carcinoma. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.68. There was 70% overall agreement with HGPIN, 43% with IDC, and 73% with invasive carcinoma (P < .001, ?(2)). Respondents considered 19 (50%) of 38 cases as IDC candidates, of which 5 (26%) had a two-thirds consensus for IDC; two-thirds consensus for either borderline or IDC was reached in 9 (47%). Two-thirds consensus other than IDC was reached in the remaining 19 of 38 cases, with 15 supporting HGPIN and 4 supporting invasive carcinoma. Findings that differed across diagnostic categories were lumen-spanning neoplastic cells (P < .001), 2× benign duct diameters (P < .001), duct space contours (round, irregular, and branched) (P < .001), papillary growth (P = .048), dense cribriform or solid growth (both P = .023), and comedonecrosis (P = .015). When the 19 of 38 images that attained consensus for HGPIN or invasive carcinoma were removed from consideration, lack of IDC consensus was most often attributable to only loose cribriform growth (5/19), central nuclear maturation (5/19), or comedonecrosis (3/19). Of the 9 histologic criteria, only 1 retained significant correlation with a consensus diagnosis of IDC: the presence of solid areas (P = .038). One case that attained IDC consensus had less than 2× duct enlargement yet still had severe nuclear atypia and nucleomegaly. Six fold nuclear enlargement was not significant (P = .083), although no image had both 6× nuclei and papillary or loose cribriform growth: a combination postulated as sufficient criteria for IDC. Finally, 20.5% of respondents agreed that an isolated diagnosis of IDC on needle biopsy warrants definitive therapy, 20.5% disagreed, and 59.0% considered the decision to depend upon clinicopathologic variables. Although IDC diagnosis remains challenging, we propose these criteria: a lumen-spanning proliferation of neoplastic cells in preexisting ducts with a dense cribriform or partial solid growth pattern. Solid growth, in any part of the duct space, emerges as the most reproducible finding to rule in a diagnosis of IDC. Comedonecrosis is a rarer finding, but in most cases, it should rule in IDC. Duct space enlargement to greater than 2× the diameter of the largest, adjacent benign spaces is usually present in IDC, although there may be rare exceptions.
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Two phases of disulfide bond formation have differing requirements for oxygen.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2013
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Most proteins destined for the extracellular space require disulfide bonds for folding and stability. Disulfide bonds are introduced co- and post-translationally in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cargo in a redox relay that requires a terminal electron acceptor. Oxygen can serve as the electron acceptor in vitro, but its role in vivo remains unknown. Hypoxia causes ER stress, suggesting a role for oxygen in protein folding. Here we demonstrate the existence of two phases of disulfide bond formation in living mammalian cells, with differential requirements for oxygen. Disulfide bonds introduced rapidly during protein synthesis can occur without oxygen, whereas those introduced during post-translational folding or isomerization are oxygen dependent. Other protein maturation processes in the secretory pathway, including ER-localized N-linked glycosylation, glycan trimming, Golgi-localized complex glycosylation, and protein transport, occur independently of oxygen availability. These results suggest that an alternative electron acceptor is available transiently during an initial phase of disulfide bond formation and that post-translational oxygen-dependent disulfide bond formation causes hypoxia-induced ER stress.
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A case report and genetic characterization of a massive acinic cell carcinoma of the parotid with delayed distant metastases.
Case Rep Oncol Med
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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We describe the presentation, management, and clinical outcome of a massive acinic cell carcinoma of the parotid gland. The primary tumor and blood underwent exome sequencing which revealed deletions in CDKN2A as well as PPP1R13B, which induces p53. A damaging nonsynonymous mutation was noted in EP300, a histone acetylase which plays a role in cellular proliferation. This study provides the first insights into the genetic underpinnings of this cancer. Future large-scale efforts will be necessary to define the mutational landscape of salivary gland malignancies to identify therapeutic targets and biomarkers of treatment failure.
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Inter-strain heterogeneity in rat hepatic transcriptomic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).
Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.
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The biochemical and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) have been the subject of intense study for decades. It is now clear that essentially all TCDD-induced toxicities are mediated by DNA-protein interactions involving the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR). Nevertheless, it remains unknown which AHR target genes cause TCDD toxicities. Several groups, including our own, have developed rodent model systems to probe these questions. mRNA expression profiling of these model systems has revealed significant inter-species heterogeneity in rodent hepatic responses to TCDD. It has remained unclear if this variability also exists within a species, amongst rodent strains. To resolve this question, we profiled the hepatic transcriptomic response to TCDD of diverse rat strains (L-E, H/W, F344 and Wistar rats) and two lines derived from L-E×H/W crosses, at consistent age, sex, and dosing (100 ?g/kg TCDD for 19 h). Using this uniquely consistent dataset, we show that the majority of TCDD-induced alterations in mRNA abundance are strain/line-specific: only 11 genes were affected by TCDD across all strains, including well-known dioxin-responsive genes such as Cyp1a1 and Nqo1. Our analysis identified two novel universally dioxin-responsive genes as well as 4 genes induced by TCDD in dioxin-sensitive rats only. These 6 genes are strong candidates to explain TCDD-related toxicities, so we validated them using 152 animals in time-course (0 to 384 h) and dose-response (0 to 3000 ?g/kg) experiments. This study reveals that different rat strains exhibit dramatic transcriptional heterogeneity in their hepatic responses to TCDD and that inter-strain comparisons can help identify candidate toxicity-related genes.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.