JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Identification of top-down forces regulating cotton aphid population growth in transgenic Bt cotton in central China.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The cotton aphid Aphis gossypii Glover is the main aphid pest in cotton fields in the Yangtze River Valley Cotton-planting Zone (YRZ) in central China. Various natural enemies may attack the cotton aphid in Bt cotton fields but no studies have identified potential specific top-down forces that could help manage this pest in the YRZ in China. In order to identify possibilities for managing the cotton aphid, we monitored cotton aphid population dynamics and identified the effect of natural enemies on cotton aphid population growth using various exclusion cages in transgenic Cry1Ac (Bt)+CpTI (Cowpea trypsin inhibitor) cotton field in 2011. The aphid population growth in the open field (control) was significantly lower than those protected or restricted from exposure to natural enemies in the various exclusion cage types tested. The ladybird predator Propylaea japonica Thunberg represented 65% of Coccinellidae predators, and other predators consisted mainly of syrphids (2.1%) and spiders (1.5%). The aphid parasitoids Aphidiines represented 76.7% of the total count of the natural enemy guild (mainly Lysiphlebia japonica Ashmead and Binodoxys indicus Subba Rao & Sharma). Our results showed that P. japonica can effectively delay the establishment and subsequent population growth of aphids during the cotton growing season. Aphidiines could also reduce aphid density although their impact may be shadowed by the presence of coccinellids in the open field (likely both owing to resource competition and intraguild predation). The implications of these results are discussed in a framework of the compatibility of transgenic crops and top-down forces exerted by natural enemy guild.
Related JoVE Video
Foraging behavior of the parasitoid Eretmocerus eremicus under intraguild predation risk by Macrolophus pygmaeus.
Pest Manag. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Intraguild predation (IGP), predation between species that use a common resource, can affect the populations of a pest, of the pest's natural enemy (IG-prey), and the predator of the pest's natural enemy (IG-predator). In this study, we determined whether the parasitoid Eretmocerus eremicus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) (IG-prey), modifies its foraging behavior under the risk of IGP by Macrolophus pygmaeus (Hemiptera: Miridae) (IG-predator). Parasitoid behavior was analyzed using two bioassays (choice and no-choice) with the following treatments: i) control, tomato leaf infested with whitefly nymphs; ii) PEP, tomato leaf infested with whitefly nymphs and previously exposed to the IG-predator; and iii) PP, tomato leaf infested with whitefly nymphs, with both, the IG-predator and the IG-prey present.
Related JoVE Video
New parasitoid-predator associations: female parasitoids do not avoid competition with generalist predators when sharing invasive prey.
Naturwissenschaften
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Optimal habitat selection is essential for species survival in ecosystems, and interspecific competition is a key ecological mechanism for many observed species association patterns. Specialized animal species are commonly affected by resource and interference competition with generalist and/or omnivorous competitors, so avoidance behavior could be expected. We hypothesize that specialist species may exploit broad range cues from such potential resource competitors (i.e., cues possibly common to various generalist and/or omnivorous predators) to avoid costly competition regarding food or reproduction, even in new species associations. We tested this hypothesis by studying short-term interactions between a native larval parasitoid and a native generalist omnivorous predator recently sharing the same invasive host/prey, the leaf miner Tuta absoluta. We observed a strong negative effect of kleptoparasitism (food resource stealing) instead of classical intraguild predation on immature parasitoids. There was no evidence that parasitoid females avoided the omnivorous predator when searching for oviposition sites, although we studied both long- and short-range known detection mechanisms. Therefore, we conclude that broad range cue avoidance may not exist in our biological system, probably because it would lead to too much oviposition site avoidance which would not be an efficient and, thus, beneficial strategy. If confirmed in other parasitoids or specialist predators, our findings may have implications for population dynamics, especially in the current context of increasing invasive species and the resulting creation of many new species associations.
Related JoVE Video
Quantitative analysis of fitness costs associated with the development of resistance to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac in Helicoverpa armigera.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops play an increasing role in pest control, and resistance management is a major issue in large-scale cultivation of Bt crops. The fitness cost of resistance in targeted pests is considered to be one of the main factors delaying resistance when using the refuge strategy. By comparing 10 resistant Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) strains, showing various resistance levels to Bt toxin (Cry1Ac), to a susceptible strain, we showed an increasing fitness cost corresponding with increasing levels of resistance. The relationship between overall fitness cost C and the resistance ratio Rr could be described by C = 24.47/(1 + exp([1.57 - Log10Rr]/0.2)). This model predicted that the maximum overall fitness cost would be ~24% (± 5.22) in the strains with the highest resistance level. The overall fitness cost was closely linked to egg hatching rate, fecundity, emergence rate, larval survival rate, and developmental duration of adults. Among fitness components measured, fecundity was the most sensitive trait linked to the resistance selection. To integrate the results into simulation models would be valuable in evaluating how variation in fitness cost may influence the development of resistance in pest populations, thus helping to develop enhanced refuge strategies.
Related JoVE Video
Delayed and time-cumulative toxicity of imidacloprid in bees, ants and termites.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Imidacloprid, one of the most commonly used insecticides, is highly toxic to bees and other beneficial insects. The regulatory challenge to determine safe levels of residual pesticides can benefit from information about the time-dependent toxicity of this chemical. Using published toxicity data for imidacloprid for several insect species, we construct time-to-lethal-effect toxicity plots and fit temporal power-law scaling curves to the data. The level of toxic exposure that results in 50% mortality after time t is found to scale as t(1.7) for ants, from t(1.6) to t(5) for honeybees, and from t(1.46) to t(2.9) for termites. We present a simple toxicological model that can explain t(2) scaling. Extrapolating the toxicity scaling for honeybees to the lifespan of winter bees suggests that imidacloprid in honey at 0.25??g/kg would be lethal to a large proportion of bees nearing the end of their life.
Related JoVE Video
Nitrogen and water availability to tomato plants triggers bottom-up effects on the leafminer Tuta absoluta.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study examined the effects of various levels of nitrogen inputs (optimal, insufficient and excessive) and water inputs (optimal, low drought and high drought) to tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) on survival and development of an invasive tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meytick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). Plant growth i.e. plant height and the number of nodes declined under insufficient or excessive nitrogen treatment. Compared to optimal N, insufficient N treatment decreased leaf N content and increased the carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N) whereas an excess of N had no effect on both leaf N content and leaf C/N ratio. Sub-optimal nitrogen supplies, water treatments and their interactions, significantly reduced the leafminer survival rate and slowed down its development. Together with the findings from three recent companion studies, we assumed that a combination of changes in nutritional value and chemical defense could explain these observed effects. Furthermore, our findings supported both the "Plant vigor hypothesis" and the "Nitrogen limitation hypothesis".
Related JoVE Video
Genetic Diversity of Sitobion avenae (Homoptera: Aphididae) Populations from Different Geographic Regions in China.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Sitobion avenae is a major agricultural pest of wheat in China. Using microsatellite markers, we studied the potential gene flow, genetic diversity, genetic differentiation, and genetic structure of seven S. avenae populations from different regions of China (Beijing, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Shandong, and Shanxi provinces). The populations from Henan, Shandong, and Jiangsu showed high levels of genic and genotypic diversity. By contrast, the genic diversity in the Beijing and Hebei populations was much lower. Despite this low genic diversity, the genotypic diversity of the Beijing population was higher than that of all of the other populations, except those from Jiangsu and Shandong. Overall, the genetic divergence among the seven S. avenae populations tested was high, though there was almost no differentiation between the Shandong and Henan populations. We observed significant negative correlation between the strength of gene flow and the geographic distances among populations. Based on genetic analysis, the seven S. avenae populations studied can be divided into four distinct clusters; (i) Hubei, (ii) Shanxi, (iii) Beijing and Hebei, and (iv) Shandong, Henan, and Jiangsu. The present results provide a basis for potentially optimizing integrated pest management (IPM) programs in China, through adapting control methods that target biological traits shared by various populations of the same genotype.
Related JoVE Video
Transcriptome characterization analysis of Bactrocera minax and new insights into its pupal diapause development with gene expression analysis.
Int. J. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Bactrocera minax is a major citrus pest distributed in China, Bhutan and India. The long pupal diapause duration of this fly is a major bottleneck for artificial rearing and underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Genetic information on B. minax transcriptome and gene expression profiles are needed to understand its pupal diapause. High-throughput RNA-seq technology was used to characterize the B. minax transcriptome and to identify differentially expressed genes during pupal diapause development. A total number of 52,519,948 reads were generated and assembled into 47,217 unigenes. 26,843 unigenes matched to proteins in the NCBI database using the BLAST search. Four digital gene expression (DGE) libraries were constructed for pupae at early diapause, late diapause, post-diapause and diapause terminated developmental status. 4,355 unigenes showing the differences expressed across four libraries revealed major shifts in cellular functions of cell proliferation, protein processing and export, metabolism and stress response in pupal diapause. When diapause was terminated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), many genes involved in ribosome and metabolism were differentially expressed which may mediate diapause transition. The gene sets involved in protein and energy metabolisms varied throughout early-, late- and post-diapause. A total of 15 genes were selected to verify the DGE results through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR); qRT-PCR expression levels strongly correlated with the DGE data. The results provided the extensive sequence resources available for B. minax and increased our knowledge on its pupal diapause development and they shed new light on the possible mechanisms involved in pupal diapause in this species.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of the key weather factors affecting overwintering success of Apolygus lucorum eggs in dead host tree branches.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Understanding the effects of weather on insect population dynamics is crucial to simulate and forecast pest outbreaks, which is becoming increasingly important with the effects of climate change. The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum is an important pest on cotton, fruit trees and other crops in China, and primarily lays its eggs on dead parts of tree branches in the fall for subsequent overwintering. As such, the eggs that hatch the following spring are most strongly affected by ambient weather factors, rather than by host plant biology. In this study, we investigated the effects of three major weather factors: temperature, relative humidity and rainfall, on the hatching rate of A. lucorum eggs overwintering on dead branches of Chinese date tree (Ziziphus jujuba). Under laboratory conditions, rainfall (simulated via soaking) was necessary for the hatching of overwintering A. lucorum eggs. In the absence of rainfall (unsoaked branches), very few nymphs successfully emerged under any of the tested combinations of temperature and relative humidity. In contrast, following simulated rainfall, the hatching rate of the overwintering eggs increased dramatically. Hatching rate and developmental rate were positively correlated with relative humidity and temperature, respectively. Under field conditions, the abundance of nymphs derived from overwintering eggs was positively correlated with rainfall amount during the spring seasons of 2009-2013, while the same was not true for temperature and relative humidity. Overall, our findings indicate that rainfall is the most important factor affecting the hatching rate of overwintering A. lucorum eggs on dead plant parts and nymph population levels during the spring season. It provides the basic information for precisely forecasting the emergence of A. lucorum and subsequently timely managing its population in spring, which will make it possible to regional control of this insect pest widely occurring in multiple crops in summer.
Related JoVE Video
Cephalaria transsylvanica-based flower strips as potential food source for bees during dry periods in European Mediterranean basin countries.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The introduction of sown wildflower strips favours the establishment of pollinator communities, with special reference to social Apoidea. Here, we evaluated the late summer flowering Cephalaria transsylvanica as suitable species for strips providing food for pollinators in paucity periods. C. transsylvanica showed no particular requirements in terms of seed germination and growth during summer. This plant had an excellent potential of self-seeding and competitiveness towards weed competitors. C. transsylvanica prevented from entomophilous pollination showed inbreeding depression, with a decrease in seed-set and accumulation of seed energy reserves. However, C. transsylvanica did not appear to be vulnerable in terms of pollination biology since it had a wide range of pollinators including bees, hoverflies and Lepidoptera. C. transsylvanica was visited mainly by honeybees and bumblebees and these latter pollinators increased their visits on C. transsylvanica flowers during early autumn. This plant may be useful as an abundant source of pollen during food paucity periods, such as autumn. We proposed C. transsylvanica for incorporation into flower strips to be planted in non-cropped farmlands in intensively managed agricultural areas as well as in proximity of beehives. The latter option may facilitate the honeybees collecting pollen and nectar for the colony, thereby ensuring robustness to overcome the winter season.
Related JoVE Video
Identification and Transcriptional Profiling of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated With Response to UVA Radiation in Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).
Environ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation, the major component of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earths surface, leads to negative effects in insects, such as oxidative stress, photoreceptor damage, and cell death. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of insect response to UVA radiation, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction approaches were combined to reveal differential transcript expression in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 (Diptera: Drosophilidae). In this study, two subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed and sequenced, obtaining 131 high-quality unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that were up- or downregulated in D. melanogaster exposed to UVA radiation for 0.5 h. Of the 131 ESTs, 102 unique ESTs were differentially expressed and classified into 10 functional categories. The results showed that UVA radiation induces expression of genes related to stress and defense response and metabolism. Potential transcription factor binding motifs upstream of these genes are associated with multiple signaling pathways that may help the insect cope with the stress of UVA radiation. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of insect response to UVA radiation at the transcriptional level. Our results reveal that UVA radiation influences the expression profiles of stress-responsive genes and provide further insights into the mechanisms of adaptive response to UVA radiation stress.
Related JoVE Video
Biology and developmental strategies of the Palaearctic parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on the neotropical moth Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).
J. Econ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
During the years after the invasion of Western Palaearctic tomato crops by the South American tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), several indigenous generalist parasitoids have been recorded on this new host. Among these, Bracon nigricans Szépligeti (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region, and has been frequently recovered from South American tomato leafminer. However, most of the available data on this species deal with taxonomic aspects and its recovery in faunistic surveys. The current study documents the biology of B. nigricans on South American tomato leafminer, and provides a scientific basis for its inclusion in South American tomato leafminer management programs in Afro-Eurasia. We studied several B. nigricans life-history traits relevant to juvenile development and reproduction by females. B. nigricans proved to be an idiobiont and a synovigenic ectoparasitoid of mature South American tomato leafminer larvae. Several B. nigricans reproductive traits were influenced by the age of the mothers; on average, the progeny had a slightly male-biased sex ratio (60% males) and a low rate of successful development (37%). Adult females lived 42.8 d and produced an average of 29.8 offspring. These biological parameters yielded an intrinsic rate of increase of 0.052. Females showed behavioral plasticity in host use, as initial host paralysis was followed by host-feeding, oviposition, or host rejection, with a consequent high mortality rate among hosts exposed to parasitism. Although further field studies are needed, these data, obtained in laboratory conditions, suggest that B. nigricans should be considered as a potential biological control agent of in newly invaded areas of the Palaearctic region.
Related JoVE Video
Spatiotemporal patterns of induced resistance and susceptibility linking diverse plant parasites.
Oecologia
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Induced defenses mediate interactions between parasites sharing the same host plant, but the outcomes of these interactions are challenging to predict because of spatiotemporal variation in plant responses and differences in defense pathways elicited by herbivores or pathogens. Dissecting these mediating factors necessitates an approach that encompasses a diversity of parasitic feeding styles and tracks interactions over space and time. We tested indirect plant-mediated relationships across three tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) consumers: (1) the fungal pathogen-powdery mildew, Oidium neolycopersici; (2) a sap-feeding insect-silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci; and (3) a chewing insect-the leaf miner, Tuta absoluta. Further, we evaluated insect/pathogen responses on local vs. systemic leaves and over short (1 day) vs. long (4 days) time scales. Overall, we documented: (1) a bi-directional negative effect between O. neolycopersici and B. tabaci; (2) an asymmetrical negative effect of B. tabaci on T. absoluta; and (3) an asymmetrical positive effect of T. absoluta on O. neolycopersici. Spatiotemporal patterns varied depending on the species pair (e.g., whitefly effects on leaf miner performance were highly localized to the induced leaf, whereas effects on pathogen growth were both local and systemic). These results highlight the context-dependent effects of induced defenses on a diverse community of tomato parasites. Notably, the outcomes correspond to those predicted by phytohormonal theory based on feeding guild differences with key implications for the recent European invasion by T. absoluta.
Related JoVE Video
Impact of the neonicotinoid acetamiprid on immature stages of the predator Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).
Ecotoxicology
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Eriopis connexa is a native coccinelid predator in the Neotropical Region. In Argentina it is commonly found associated to sucking pests in several crops and among them aphids and whiteflies. These pests are usually controlled with newly developed systemic insecticides, such as the neonicotinoids. However, the compatibility between selective pesticides and natural enemies is required before incorporating them in integrated pest management (IPM) packages. Within this frame, the objective of this study was to evaluate the side effect of various concentrations/doses of one commonly used neonicotinoid in vegetal crops, acetamiprid, on immature stages of E. connexa by dipping or topical exposure for eggs and larvae, respectively. Acetamiprid reduced egg hatching from 34 to 100 %. Moreover, the embryogenesis was disrupted by insecticide at early embryo stage at all tested concentrations. Second larval instar was more susceptible to acetamiprid than the fourth one and this susceptibility was positively related with the tested concentrations. On the other hand, the survival reduction at larval stage reached 100 % from 20 mg a.i./L (10 % of maximum field concentration). Besides, the reproduction of the females developed from topical bioassays on fourth instar larvae was strongly affected, with reduction in fecundity and fertility from 22 to 44 % and from 37 to 45 %, respectively. Overall the results showed a high toxicity of acetamiprid on immature stages of E. connexa, demonstrating that this broadly used insecticide could reduce biocontrol services provided by this predator and could also likely disturb IPM programs.
Related JoVE Video
Assessment of potential sublethal effects of various insecticides on key biological traits of the tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.
Int. J. Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci is one of the most devastating pests worldwide. Current management of B. tabaci relies upon the frequent applications of insecticides. In addition to direct mortality by typical acute toxicity (lethal effect), insecticides may also impair various key biological traits of the exposed insects through physiological and behavioral sublethal effects. Identifying and characterizing such effects could be crucial for understanding the global effects of insecticides on the pest and therefore for optimizing its management in the crops. We assessed the effects of sublethal and low-lethal concentrations of four widely used insecticides on the fecundity, honeydew excretion and feeding behavior of B. tabaci adults. The probing activity of the whiteflies feeding on treated cotton seedlings was recorded by an Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG). The results showed that imidacloprid and bifenthrin caused a reduction in phloem feeding even at sublethal concentrations. In addition, the honeydew excretions and fecundity levels of adults feeding on leaf discs treated with these concentrations were significantly lower than the untreated ones. While, sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos and carbosulfan did not affect feeding behavior, honeydew excretion and fecundity of the whitefly. We demonstrated an antifeedant effect of the imidacloprid and bifenthrin on B. tabaci, whereas behavioral changes in adults feeding on leaves treated with chlorpyrifos and carbosulfan were more likely caused by the direct effects of the insecticides on the insects nervous system itself. Our results show that aside from the lethal effect, the sublethal concentration of imidacloprid and bifenthrin impairs the phloem feeding, i.e. the most important feeding trait in a plant protection perspective. Indeed, this antifeedant property would give these insecticides potential to control insect pests indirectly. Therefore, the behavioral effects of sublethal concentrations of imidacloprid and bifenthrin may play an important role in the control of whitefly pests by increasing the toxicity persistence in treated crops.
Related JoVE Video
Transcriptome profiling of Chironomus kiinensis under phenol stress using Solexa sequencing technology.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Phenol is a major pollutant in aquatic ecosystems due to its chemical stability, water solubility and environmental mobility. To date, little is known about the molecular modifications of invertebrates under phenol stress. In the present study, we used Solexa sequencing technology to investigate the transcriptome and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of midges (Chironomus kiinensis) in response to phenol stress. A total of 51,518,972 and 51,150,832 clean reads in the phenol-treated and control libraries, respectively, were obtained and assembled into 51,014 non-redundant (Nr) consensus sequences. A total of 6,032 unigenes were classified by Gene Ontology (GO), and 18,366 unigenes were categorized into 238 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) categories. These genes included representatives from almost all functional categories. A total of 10,724 differentially expressed genes (P value <0.05) were detected in a comparative analysis of the expression profiles between phenol-treated and control C. kiinensis including 8,390 upregulated and 2,334 downregulated genes. The expression levels of 20 differentially expressed genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR, and the trends in gene expression that were observed matched the Solexa expression profiles, although the magnitude of the variations was different. Through pathway enrichment analysis, significantly enriched pathways were identified for the DEGs, including metabolic pathways, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pancreatic secretion and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathways, which may be associated with the phenol responses of C. kiinensis. Using Solexa sequencing technology, we identified several groups of key candidate genes as well as important biological pathways involved in the molecular modifications of chironomids under phenol stress.
Related JoVE Video
Preference and prey switching in a generalist predator attacking local and invasive alien pests.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Invasive pest species may strongly affect biotic interactions in agro-ecosystems. The ability of generalist predators to prey on new invasive pests may result in drastic changes in the population dynamics of local pest species owing to predator-mediated indirect interactions among prey. On a short time scale, the nature and strength of such indirect interactions depend largely on preferences between prey and on predator behavior patterns. Under laboratory conditions we evaluated the prey preference of the generalist predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur (Heteroptera: Miridae) when it encounters simultaneously the local tomato pest Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and the invasive alien pest Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). We tested various ratios of local vs. alien prey numbers, measuring switching by the predator from one prey to the other, and assessing what conditions (e.g. prey species abundance and prey development stage) may favor such prey switching. The total predation activity of M. pygmaeus was affected by the presence of T. absoluta in the prey complex with an opposite effect when comparing adult and juvenile predators. The predator showed similar preference toward T. absoluta eggs and B. tabaci nymphs, but T. absoluta larvae were clearly less attacked. However, prey preference strongly depended on prey relative abundance with a disproportionately high predation on the most abundant prey and disproportionately low predation on the rarest prey. Together with the findings of a recent companion study (Bompard et al. 2013, Population Ecology), the insight obtained on M. pygmaeus prey switching may be useful for Integrated Pest Management in tomato crops, notably for optimal simultaneous management of B. tabaci and T. absoluta, which very frequently co-occur on tomato.
Related JoVE Video
Intraguild Predation on the Whitefly Parasitoid Eretmocerus eremicus by the Generalist Predator Geocoris punctipes: A Behavioral Approach.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Intraguild predation (IGP) takes place when natural enemies that use similar resources attack each other. The impact of IGP on biological control can be significant if the survival of natural enemy species is disrupted. In the present study, we assessed whether Geocoris punctipes (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) engages in IGP on Eretmocerus eremicus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) while developing on whitefly nymphs of Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). In choice and non-choice tests, we exposed G. punctipes to parasitized and non-parasitized whitefly nymphs. We found that G. punctipes does practice IGP on E. eremicus. However, choice tests assessing G. punctipes consumption revealed a significant preference for non-parasitized T. vaporariorum nymphs. Subsequently, we investigated whether E. eremicus females modify their foraging behavior when exposed to conditions involving IGP risk. To assess this, we analyzed wasp foraging behavior under the following treatments: i) whitefly nymphs only (control?=?C), ii) whitefly nymphs previously exposed to a predator (?=?PEP) and, iii) whitefly nymphs and presence of a predator (?=?PP). In non-choice tests we found that E. eremicus did not significantly modify its number of attacks, attack duration, oviposition duration, or behavior sequences. However, E. eremicus oviposited significantly more eggs in the PEP treatment. In the PP treatment, G. punctipes also preyed upon adult E. eremicus wasps, significantly reducing their number of ovipositions and residence time. When the wasps were studied under choice tests, in which they were exposed simultaneously to all three treatments, the number of attacks and frequency of selection were similar under all treatments. These results indicate that under IGP risk, E. eremicus maintains several behavioral traits, but can also increase its number of ovipositions in the presence of IG-predator cues. We discuss these findings in the context of population dynamics and biological control.
Related JoVE Video
Do biopesticides affect the demographic traits of a parasitoid wasp and its biocontrol services through sublethal effects?
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Pesticide risk assessments are usually based on short-term acute toxicity tests, while longer-term population dynamic related traits, critical to the success of biological control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, are often overlooked. This is increasingly important with respect to new biopesticides that frequently cause no short-term acute effects, but that can induce multiple physiological and behavioral sublethal effects, leading to a decrease in population growth and ecosystem services. In this study we assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six biopesticides [abamectin, azadirachtin, Bacillus thuringiensis, borax plus citrus oil (Prev-Am®), emamectin benzoate, and spinosad], used in tomato crops to control the invasive pest Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), on adults and pupae of the parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Data on female survival and production of female offspring were used to calculate population growth indexes as a measure of population recovery after pesticide exposure. Spinosad caused 100% and 80% mortality in exposed adults (even 10 d after the treatment) and pupae, respectively. Although most of the biopesticides had low levels of acute toxicity, multiple sublethal effects were observed. The biocontrol activity of both females that survived 1-h and 10-d old residues, and females that emerged from topically treated pupae was significantly affected by the application of the neurotoxic insecticides emamectin benzoate and abamectin. Furthermore, very low B. nigricans demographic growth indices were estimated for these two insecticides, indicating potential local extinction of the wasp populations. Among the tested products, Bt proved to be the safest for B. nigricans adults and pupae. Our findings emphasize that acute toxicity assessment alone cannot fully predict the actual impact of pesticides on non-target parasitoids. Thus, sublethal effects related to the species specific life-history variables must be carefully considered in order to assess pesticide risks and to incorporate new pesticides, including biopesticides, into IPM programmes.
Related JoVE Video
RNAi silencing of the HaHMG-CoA reductase gene inhibits oviposition in the Helicoverpa armigera cotton bollworm.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
RNA interference (RNAi) has considerable promise for developing novel pest control techniques, especially because of the threat of the development of resistance against current strategies. For this purpose, the key is to select pest control genes with the greatest potential for developing effective pest control treatments. The present study demonstrated that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase; HMGR) gene is a potential target for insect control using RNAi. HMGR is a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway in insects. A complete cDNA encoding full length HMGR (encoding an 837-aa protein) was cloned from Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The HaHMGR (H. armigera HMGR) knockdown using systemic RNAi in vivo inhibited the fecundity of the females, effectively inhibited ovipostion, and significantly reduced vitellogenin (Vg) mRNA levels. Moreover, the oviposition rate of the female moths was reduced by 98% by silencing HaHMGR compared to the control groups. One-pair experiments showed that both the proportions of valid mating and fecundity were zero. Furthermore, the HaHMGR-silenced females failed to lay eggs (approximate 99% decrease in oviposition) in the semi-field cage performance. The present study demonstrated the potential implications for developing novel pest management strategies using HaHMGR RNAi in the control of H. armigera and other insect pests.
Related JoVE Video
Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 August 2011-30 September 2011.
Mol Ecol Resour
PUBLISHED: 12-04-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This article documents the addition of 299 microsatellite marker loci and nine pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) EPIC primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources (MER) Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Alosa pseudoharengus, Alosa aestivalis, Aphis spiraecola, Argopecten purpuratus, Coreoleuciscus splendidus, Garra gotyla, Hippodamia convergens, Linnaea borealis, Menippe mercenaria, Menippe adina, Parus major, Pinus densiflora, Portunus trituberculatus, Procontarinia mangiferae, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, Schizothorax richardsonii, Scophthalmus rhombus, Tetraponera aethiops, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, Tuta absoluta and Ugni molinae. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Barilius bendelisis, Chiromantes haematocheir, Eriocheir sinensis, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus cladocalix, Eucalyptus globulus, Garra litaninsis vishwanath, Garra para lissorhynchus, Guindilla trinervis, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, Luma chequen. Guayaba, Myrceugenia colchagüensis, Myrceugenia correifolia, Myrceugenia exsucca, Parasesarma plicatum, Parus major, Portunus pelagicus, Psidium guayaba, Schizothorax richardsonii, Scophthalmus maximus, Tetraponera latifrons, Thaumetopoea bonjeani, Thaumetopoea ispartensis, Thaumetopoea libanotica, Thaumetopoea pinivora, Thaumetopoea pityocampa ena clade, Thaumetopoea solitaria, Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni and Tor putitora. This article also documents the addition of nine EPIC primer pairs for Euphaea decorata, Euphaea formosa, Euphaea ornata and Euphaea yayeyamana.
Related JoVE Video
Phytophagous arthropods and a pathogen sharing a host plant: evidence for indirect plant-mediated interactions.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In ecological systems, indirect interactions between plant pathogens and phytophagous arthropods can arise when infestation by a first attacker alters the common host plant so that although a second attacker could be spatially or temporally separated from the first one, the former could be affected. The induction of plant defense reactions leading to the production of secondary metabolites is thought to have an important role since it involves antagonistic and/or synergistic cross-talks that may determine the outcome of such interactions. We carried out experiments under controlled conditions on young rose plants in order to assess the impact of these indirect interactions on life history traits of three pests: the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr. (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae), the aphid Rhodobium porosum Sanderson (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Our results indicated (i) a bi-directional negative interaction between B. cinerea and R. porosum, which is conveyed by decreased aphid growth rate and reduced fungal lesion area, as well as (ii) an indirect negative effect of B. cinerea on insect behavior. No indirect effect was observed between thrips and aphids. This research highlights several complex interactions that may be involved in structuring herbivore and plant pathogen communities within natural and managed ecosystems.
Related JoVE Video
Ecology and management of the soybean aphid in North America.
Annu. Rev. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, has become the single most important arthropod pest of soybeans in North America. Native to Asia, this invasive species was first discovered in North America in July 2000 and has rapidly spread throughout the northcentral United States, much of southeastern Canada, and the northeastern United States. In response, important elements of the ecology of the soybean aphid in North America have been elucidated, with economic thresholds, sampling plans, and chemical control recommendations widely adopted. Aphid-resistant soybean varieties were available to growers in 2010. The preexisting community of aphid natural enemies has been highly effective in suppressing aphid populations in many situations, and classical biological control efforts have focused on the addition of parasitoids of Asian origin. The keys to sustainable management of this pest include understanding linkages between the soybean aphid and other introduced and native species in a landscape context along with continued development of aphid-resistant varieties.
Related JoVE Video
Use of an innovative T-tube maze assay and the proboscis extension response assay to assess sublethal effects of GM products and pesticides on learning capacity of the honey bee Apis mellifera L.
Ecotoxicology
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Transgenic Cry1Ac+CpTI cotton (CCRI41) is a promising cotton cultivar throughout China but side effects and especially sublethal effects of this transgenic cultivar on beneficial insects remain poorly studied. More specifically potential sublethal effects on behavioural traits of the honey bee Apis mellifera L. have not been formally assessed despite the importance of honey bees for pollination. The goal of our study was to assess potential effects of CCRI41 cotton pollen on visual and olfactory learning by honey bees. After a 7-day oral chronic exposure to honey mixed with either CCRI41 pollen, imidacloprid-treated conventional pollen (used as positive sublethal control) or conventional pollen (control), learning performance was evaluated by the classical proboscis extension reflex (PER) procedure as well as a T-tube maze test. The latter assay was designed as a new device to assess potential side effects of pesticides on visual associative learning of honey bees. These two procedures were complementary because the former focused on olfactory learning while the latter was involved in visual learning based on visual orientation ability. Oral exposure to CCRI41 pollen did not affect learning capacities of honey bees in both the T-tube maze and PER tests. However, exposure to imidacloprid resulted in reduced visual learning capacities in T-tube maze evaluation and decreased olfactory learning performances measured with PER. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of risks of transgenic CCRI41 cotton crops for honey bees.
Related JoVE Video
Quantification of toxins in a Cry1Ac + CpTI cotton cultivar and its potential effects on the honey bee Apis mellifera L.
Ecotoxicology
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Transgenic Cry1Ac + CpTI cotton (CCRI41) is increasingly planted throughout China. However, negative effects of this cultivar on the honey bee Apis mellifera L., the most important pollinator for cultivated ecosystem, remained poorly investigated. The objective of our study was to evaluate the potential side effects of transgenic Cry1Ac + CpTI pollen from cotton on young adult honey bees A. mellifera L. Two points emphasized the significance of our study: (1) A higher expression level of insecticidal protein Cry1Ac in pollen tissues was detected (when compared with previous reports). In particular, Cry1Ac protein was detected at 300 ± 4.52 ng g(-1) [part per billion (ppb)] in pollen collected in July, (2) Effects on chronic mortality and feeding behaviour in honey bees were evaluated using a no-choice dietary feeding protocol with treated pollen, which guarantee the highest exposure level to bees potentially occurring in natural conditions (worst case scenario). Tests were also conducted using imidacloprid-treated pollen at a concentration of 48 ppb as positive control for sublethal effect on feeding behaviour. Our results suggested that Cry1Ac + CpTI pollen carried no lethal risk for honey bees. However, during a 7-day oral exposure to the various treatments (transgenic, imidacloprid-treated and control), honey bee feeding behaviour was disturbed and bees consumed significantly less CCRI41 cotton pollen than in the control group in which bees were exposed to conventional cotton pollen. It may indicate an antifeedant effect of CCRI41 pollen on honey bees and thus bees may be at risk because of large areas are planted with transgenic Bt cotton in China. This is the first report suggesting a potential sublethal effect of CCRI41 cotton pollen on honey bees. The implications of the results are discussed in terms of risk assessment for bees as well as for directions of future work involving risk assessment of CCRI41 cotton.
Related JoVE Video
Attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris to host (Spodoptera frugiperda) frass is affected by transgenic maize.
Ecotoxicology
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We assessed in the laboratory the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris (Cresson) toward odors emitted by conventional maize (Zea mays L. ssp. mays) and Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) maize seedlings following actual or simulated injury by Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith), the parasitoids host, and emitted by the hosts frass, produced following consumption of conventional or Bt maize seedlings. Females of C. marginiventris exhibited similarly strong responses to conventional and Bt maize seedlings injured by the host or with simulated injury, and these were stronger than responses to clean air. In contrast, the responses of C. marginiventris females were consistently weaker toward host frass derived from Bt maize tissue compared to frass derived from conventional maize tissue. We hypothesized that the weakened response was due to a detrimental effect of Bt endotoxins, present in the Bt maize tissue, on the bacterial community present in the hosts gut and frass, including bacteria that produce odors attractive to C. marginiventris. As an initial test of our hypothesis, we compared between the responses of C. marginiventris females to host frass produced following consumption of Bt maize and frass produced from conventional maize which had been treated with an antibiotic (tetracycline) to eliminate host gut bacteria. Our results showed that C. marginiventris females responded similarly weakly to host frass derived from conventional maize tissue treated with antibiotic and to frass derived from Bt maize tissue, treated or untreated with antibiotic, while they responded strongly to frass derived from conventional maize untreated with antibiotic, so provided initial, partial support for our hypothesis. We discussed the weakened response of C. marginiventris females to host frass derived from Bt maize in the context of plausible impacts of transgenic crop cultivars on parasitoid foraging and populations, and the implications for biological control of non-target, polyphagous pests, such as S. frugiperda.
Related JoVE Video
Transient host paralysis as a means of reducing self-superparasitism in koinobiont endoparasitoids.
J. Insect Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The term idiobiont refers to those parasitoid species that permanently paralyse their hosts during parasitism, causing the cessation of host growth and development. This is in contrast to koinobiont parasitoids, which allow their hosts to continue developing after being parasitized. While no koinobiont species induce permanent paralysis in their hosts, a minority of koinobionts induce a temporary paralysis that does not interfere with overall host growth and development. We characterized transient paralysis induction in two koinobiont aphid parasitoids in the genus Binodoxys (Hymenoptera: Aphidiinae). Both Binodoxys species induced transient paralysis in Aphis glycines, with paralysis time ranging between 4.5 and 8 min (depending upon parasitoid species and host instar). In a separate experiment, B. communis was capable of inducing transient paralysis in nine aphid species. We addressed two hypotheses potentially explaining the adaptive value of temporary host paralysis in experiments using A. nerii, which is readily accepted but engages in strong defensive behaviour. The first hypothesis is that paralysis increases oviposition success by interfering with host defences and the second is that it aids in the avoidance of self-superparasitism. Paralysed aphids were more likely to be rejected by B. communis than were aphids that had never been stung or that had recovered from paralysis. This result supports the avoidance-of-self-superparasitism hypothesis and is inconsistent with the hypothesis that transient paralysis increases oviposition success of B. communis.
Related JoVE Video
Multifaceted determinants of host specificity in an aphid parasitoid.
Oecologia
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The host specificity of insect parasitoids and herbivores is thought to be shaped by a suite of traits that mediate host acceptance and host suitability. We conducted laboratory experiments to identify mechanisms shaping the host specificity of the aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis. Twenty species of aphids were exposed to B. communis females in microcosms, and detailed observations and rearing studies of 15 of these species were done to determine whether patterns of host use resulted from variation in factors such as host acceptance or variation in host suitability. Six species of aphids exposed to B. communis showed no signs of parasitism. Four of these species were not recognized as hosts and two effectively defended themselves from attack by B. communis. Other aphid species into which parasitoids laid eggs had low suitability as hosts. Parasitoid mortality occurred in the egg or early larval stages for some of these hosts but for others it occurred in late larval stages. Two hypotheses explaining low suitability were investigated in separate experiments: the presence of endosymbiotic bacteria conferring resistance to parasitoids, and aphids feeding on toxic plants. An association between resistance and endosymbiont infection was found in one species (Aphis craccivora), and evidence for the toxic plant hypothesis was found for the milkweed aphids Aphis asclepiadis and Aphis nerii. This research highlights the multifaceted nature of factors determining host specificity in parasitoids.
Related JoVE Video
Assessing European egg parasitoids as a mean of controlling the invasive South American tomato pinworm Tuta absoluta.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The South American tomato pinworm (Tuta absoluta) has recently invaded Europe and is rapidly spreading in the Afro-Eurasian continent where it is becoming a major pest on tomato crops. Laboratory tests were undertaken to evaluate the potential of 29 European strains of Trichogramma parasitoids to control T. absoluta. In addition to the host itself, the host plant (tomato) was used during the laboratory tests in order to increase the chance of selecting the best parasitoid strains. Trichogramma females were placed with T. absoluta eggs on a tomato leaflet in tubes. We compared the parasitism of T. absoluta by the various Trichogramma species tested to the Trichogramma species currently commercially available for the pest control in Europe, i.e. Trichogramma achaeae. Thereafter, the more promising strains were tested on a larger scale, in mesocosm (i.e. cages in greenhouses) and in greenhouse compartments to evaluate efficiency of laboratory selected strains under cropping conditions. The most efficient strain from the laboratory screening trials did not perform as efficiently under the greenhouse conditions. We discuss differences in parasitism levels among species and strains and among the different scales tested in the experiments, as well as implications of these results for further screening for biocontrol agents.
Related JoVE Video
The non-target impact of spinosyns on beneficial arthropods.
Pest Manag. Sci.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Spinosyn-based products, mostly spinosad, have been widely recommended by extension specialists and agribusiness companies; consequently, they have been used to control various pests in many different cropping systems. Following the worldwide adoption of spinosad-based products for integrated and organic farming, an increasing number of ecotoxicological studies have been published in the past 10 years. These studies are primarily related to the risk assessment of spinosad towards beneficial arthropods. This review takes into account recent data with the aim of (i) highlighting potentially adverse effects of spinosyns on beneficial arthropods (and hence on ecosystem services that they provide in agroecosystems), (ii) clarifying the range of methods used to address spinosyn side effects on biocontrol agents and pollinators in order to provide new insights for the development of more accurate bioassays, (iii) identifying pitfalls when analysing laboratory results to assess field risks and (iv) gaining increasing knowledge on side effects when using spinosad for integrated pest management (IPM) programmes and organic farming. For the first time, a thorough review of possible risks of spinosad and novel spinosyns (such as spinetoram) to beneficial arthropods (notably natural enemies and pollinators) is provided. The acute lethal effect and multiple sublethal effects have been identified in almost all arthropod groups studied. This review will help to optimise the future use of spinosad and new spinosyns in IPM programmes and for organic farming, notably by preventing the possible side effects of spinosyns on beneficial arthropods.
Related JoVE Video
Field evaluation of attractive lures for the fruit fly Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their potential use in spot sprays in Hubei Province (China).
J. Econ. Entomol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The Chinese citrus fruit fly, Bactrocera minax (Enderlein) is a univoltine Tephritidae pest that infests Citrus species. Field trials were conducted in 2010 to determine the potential use of a lure based on enzymatical-hydrolyzed beer yeast as liquid bait (hereafter named H-protein bait) for B. minax in the Hubei province, China. In a citrus orchard, we compared the attractiveness among aqueous solutions of H-protein bait, GF-120 fruit fly bait, sugar-vinegar-wine mixture, torula yeast, and Jufeng attractant when used in traps and in spot sprays, that is, lures used in combination with the insecticide trichlorphon. The H-protein bait was the most attractive lure in traps, ensnaring significantly more adults than sugar-vinegar-wine mixture, torula yeast, and Jufeng attractant, in decreasing efficiency order. In spot sprays those with H-protein bait killed significantly more female and male flies within 40 min than those with sugar-vinegar-wine mixture, GF-120, Jufeng attractant, and the control. In addition, the total number of flies killed by H-protein bait during the spot spray duration was higher than other treatments. Our results demonstrated that the H-protein bait may be a useful tool in citrus orchards in China to monitor B. minax populations as well as to manage this pest when used in spot sprays.
Related JoVE Video
Does transgenic Cry1Ac + CpTI cotton pollen affect hypopharyngeal gland development and midgut proteolytic enzyme activity in the honey bee Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera, Apidae)?
Ecotoxicology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The transgenic Cry1Ac (Bt toxin) + CpTI (Cowpea Trypsin Inhibitor) cotton cultivar CCRI41 is increasingly used in China and potential side effects on the honey bee Apis mellifera L. have been documented recently. Two studies have assessed potential lethal and sublethal effects in young bees fed with CCRI41 cotton pollen but no effect was observed on learning capacities, although lower feeding activity in exposed honey bees was noted (antifeedant effect). The present study aimed at providing further insights into potential side effects of CCRI41 cotton on honey bees. Emerging honey bees were exposed to different pollen diets using no-choice feeding protocols (chronic exposure) in controlled laboratory conditions and we aimed at documenting potential mechanisms underneath the CCRI41 antifeedant effect previously reported. Activity of midgut proteolytic enzyme of young adult honey bees fed on CCRI41 cotton pollen were not significantly affected, i.e. previously observed antifeedant effect was not linked to disturbed activity of the proteolytic enzymes in bees midgut. Hypopharyngeal gland development was assessed by quantifying total extractable proteins from the glands. Results suggested that CCRI41 cotton pollen carries no risk to hypopharyngeal gland development of young adult honey bees. In the two bioassays, honey bees exposed to 1 % soybean trypsin inhibitor were used as positive controls for both midgut proteolytic enzymes and hypopharyngeal gland proteins quantification, and bees exposed to 48 ppb (part per billion) (i.e. 48 ng g(-1)) imidacloprid were used as controls for exposure to a sublethal concentration of toxic product. The results show that the previously reported antifeedant effect of CCRI41 cotton pollen on honey bees is not linked to effects on their midgut proteolytic enzymes or on the development of their hypopharyngeal glands. The results of the study are discussed in the framework of risk assessment of transgenic crops on honey bees.
Related JoVE Video
Assessment of physiological sublethal effects of imidacloprid on the mirid bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür).
Ecotoxicology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is currently one of major mirid pests in the Yangtze River and the Yellow River regions in China. Imidacloprid (neonicotinoid) is widely used against pierce-sucking pest insects, including against A. lucorum. In addition to its direct lethal effect, multiple negative sublethal effects may also occur in exposed insects. We assessed potential sublethal effects of imidacloprid on some biological characteristics of A. lucorum with the aim of increasing rational use of imidacloprid against that cotton pest. The lethal toxicity of imidacloprid on adults of A. lucorum was determined in laboratory conditions by a topical application bioassay (LD(50) = 6.70 ng a.i. [active ingredient]/A. lucorum adult). We also estimated a sublethal dose, LD(5) (0.38 ng a.i./adult), a low lethal dose, LD(25) (1.96 ng a.i./adult), and moderate lethal dose, LD(40) (3.97 ng a.i./adult). The sublethal dose of imidacloprid (LD(5)) shortened the pre-oviposition period of females but increased the time required for eggs to develop (i.e. longer embryogenesis). The low lethal dose (LD(25)) also reduced the pre-oviposition period. Females exposed to the LD(40) laid eggs that developed faster but overall percentage of eggs hatching was reduced. LD(25) and LD(40) reduced longevity of males but not of females. In addition, the susceptibility to seven insecticides generally used on Chinese crops was not modified in A. lucorum previously exposed to the LD(25) of imidacloprid. Our results demonstrate sublethal effects of low doses of imidacloprid on A. lucorum (notably on pre-oviposition period and egg development) which may have an impact on population dynamics of this pest.
Related JoVE Video
Widespread adoption of Bt cotton and insecticide decrease promotes biocontrol services.
Nature
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Over the past 16 years, vast plantings of transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have helped to control several major insect pests and reduce the need for insecticide sprays. Because broad-spectrum insecticides kill arthropod natural enemies that provide biological control of pests, the decrease in use of insecticide sprays associated with Bt crops could enhance biocontrol services. However, this hypothesis has not been tested in terms of long-term landscape-level impacts. On the basis of data from 1990 to 2010 at 36 sites in six provinces of northern China, we show here a marked increase in abundance of three types of generalist arthropod predators (ladybirds, lacewings and spiders) and a decreased abundance of aphid pests associated with widespread adoption of Bt cotton and reduced insecticide sprays in this crop. We also found evidence that the predators might provide additional biocontrol services spilling over from Bt cotton fields onto neighbouring crops (maize, peanut and soybean). Our work extends results from general studies evaluating ecological effects of Bt crops by demonstrating that such crops can promote biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes.
Related JoVE Video
Short-term and transgenerational effects of the neonicotinoid nitenpyram on susceptibility to insecticides in two whitefly species.
Ecotoxicology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The cosmopolitan silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci which had coexisted with Trialeurodes vaporariorum in Northern China for many years, has become the dominant species in the last years. Recent reports show that it is gradually displacing the other greenhouse whitefly species. Neonicotinoid, which includes nitenpyram, is a major group of insecticides used against whiteflies in various crops. When exposed to low doses of insecticides, insects may develop resistance by adapting physiologically. The short- and long-term effects of nitenpyram on insecticide sensitivity in B. tabaci biotype B and T. vaporariorum adult populations have been compared in the present study. After being exposed to LC(25) of nitenpyram for 24 h, the B. tabaci biotype B adults showed no significant change in susceptibility to nitenpyram or to five other insecticides: imidacloprid, acetamiprid, abamectin, chlorpyrifos and beta-cypermethrin. By contrast, exposure to the LC(25) of nitenpyram for 24 h led to a significant increase in the susceptibility of T. vaporariorum to nitenpyram and imidacloprid, by 1.8- and 2-fold, respectively. When exposed for seven generations to the LC(25) of nitenpyram, B. tabaci developed 6-fold resistance to nitenpyram, and 3.1- and 5-fold cross-resistance to imidacloprid and acetamiprid, respectively, whereas T. vaporariorum developed lower resistance (3.7-fold) to the nitenpyram and very low cross-resistance to imidacloprid (2.5-fold). The higher adaptable nature of B. tabaci (demonstrated here in the case of nitenpyram) when exposed to low doses of insecticides may provide a selective advantage when competing with T. vaporariorum in crops.
Related JoVE Video
Dietary traces of neonicotinoid pesticides as a cause of population declines in honey bees: an evaluation by Hills epidemiological criteria.
Pest Manag. Sci.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Honey bees are important pollinators of both crops and wild plants. Pesticide regimes that threaten their sustainability should therefore be assessed. As an example, evidence that the agricultural use of neonicotinoid pesticides is a cause of the recently observed declines in honey bees is examined. The aim is to define exacting demographic conditions for a detrimental factor to precipitate a population decline, and Hills epidemiological causality criteria are employed as a structured process for making an expert judgement about the proposition that trace dietary neonicotinoids in nectar and pollen cause population declines in honey bees.
Related JoVE Video
Lethal effect of imidacloprid on the coccinellid predator Serangium japonicum and sublethal effects on predator voracity and on functional response to the whitefly Bemisia tabaci.
Ecotoxicology
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Neonicotinoid insecticides are widely used for controlling sucking pests, and sublethal effects can be expected in beneficial arthropods like natural enemies. Serangium japonicum is an important predator in many agricultural systems in China, and a potential biological control agent against Bemisia tabaci. We evaluated the toxicity of imidacloprid to S. japonicum and its impact on the functional response to B. tabaci eggs. S. japonicum adults exposed through contact to dried residues of imidacloprid at the recommended field rate on cotton against B. tabaci (4 g active ingredient per 100 l, i.e. 40 ppm [part per million]), and reduced rates (25, 20, 15 and 10 ppm) for 24 h showed high mortality rates. The mortality induced by a lowest rate, 5 ppm, was not significantly different than the control group and thus it was considered as a sublethal rate. The lethal rate 50 and hazard quotient (HQ) were estimated to be 11.54 ppm and 3.47 respectively, indicating a risk for S. japonicum in treated fields (HQ > 2). When exposed to dried residues of imidacloprid at the sublethal rate (5 ppm) on cotton leaves, functional response of S. japonicum to B. tabaci eggs was affected with an increase in handling time and a reduction in peak consumption of eggs. Imidacloprid residues also disturbed predator voracity, the number of B. tabaci eggs consumed on treated leaves being significantly lower than on untreated leaves. All effects disappeared within a few hours after transfer to untreated cotton leaves. Imidacloprid systemically applied at the recommended field rate (for cotton) showed no toxicity to S. japonicum, nor affected the functional response of the predator. Sublethal effects of imidacloprid on S. japonicum observed in our study likely negatively affect S. japonicum development and reproductive capacity and may ultimately reduce predator population growth. These results hint at the importance of assessing potential effects of imidacloprid on S. japonicum for developing effective integrated pest management programs of B. tabaci in China.
Related JoVE Video
Host phylogeny and specialisation in parasitoids.
Ecol. Lett.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The host range of insect parasitoids and herbivores is influenced by both preference-related traits which mediate host choice behaviour, and performance-related traits which mediate the physiological suitability of the consumer-resource interaction. In a previous study, we characterised the influence of preference- and performance-related traits on the host range of the aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and herein we build upon those data sets by mapping a series of these traits onto the phylogeny of the (aphid) host species. We found a strong effect of host phylogeny on overall parasitoid reproduction on the 20 host species tested, but no effect of the phylogeny of host plants of the aphids. We found an effect of aphid phylogeny on host acceptance and sting rates (related to preference) from behavioural observations and for pupal survivorship (related to performance), showing that both classes of traits show phylogenetic conservatism with respect to host species.
Related JoVE Video
Using organic-certified rather than synthetic pesticides may not be safer for biological control agents: selectivity and side effects of 14 pesticides on the predator Orius laevigatus.
Chemosphere
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The generalist predator Orius laevigatus (Fieber) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) is a key natural enemy of various arthropods in agricultural and natural ecosystems. Releases of this predator are frequently carried out, and it is included in the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs of several crops. The accurate assessment of the compatibility of various pesticides with predator activity is key for the success of this strategy. We assessed acute and sublethal toxicity of 14 pesticides on O. laevigatus adults under laboratory conditions. Pesticides commonly used in either conventional or organic farming were selected for the study, including six biopesticides, three synthetic insecticides, two sulfur compounds and three adjuvants. To assess the pesticides residual persistence, the predator was exposed for 3d to pesticide residues on tomato sprouts that had been treated 1 h, 7 d or 14 d prior to the assay. The percentage of mortality and the sublethal effects on predator reproductive capacity were summarized in a reduction coefficient (E(x)) and the pesticides were classified according to the IOBC (International Organization for Biological Control) toxicity categories. The results showed that the pesticides greatly differed in their toxicity, both in terms of lethal and sub lethal effects, as well as in their persistence. In particular, abamectin was the most noxious and persistent, and was classified as harmful up to 14 d after the treatment, causing almost 100% mortality. Spinosad, emamectin, metaflumizone were moderately harmful until 7 d after the treatment, while the other pesticides were slightly harmful or harmless. The results, based on the combination of assessment of acute mortality, predator reproductive capacity pesticides residual and pesticides residual persistence, stress the need of using complementary bioassays (e.g. assessment of lethal and sublethal effects) to carefully select the pesticides to be used in IPM programs and appropriately time the pesticides application (as function of natural enemies present in crops) and potential releases of natural enemies like O. laevigatus.
Related JoVE Video
Worldwide Populations of the Aphid Aphis craccivora Are Infected with Diverse Facultative Bacterial Symbionts.
Microb. Ecol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Facultative bacterial endosymbionts can play an important role in the evolutionary trajectory of their hosts. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are infected with a wide variety of facultative endosymbionts that can confer ecologically relevant traits, which in turn may drive microevolutionary processes in a dynamic selective environment. However, relatively little is known about how symbiont diversity is structured in most aphid species. Here, we investigate facultative symbiont species richness and prevalence among worldwide populations of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch. We surveyed 44 populations of A. craccivora, and detected 11 strains of facultative symbiotic bacteria, representing six genera. There were two significant associations between facultative symbiont and aphid food plant: the symbiont Arsenophonus was found at high prevalence in A. craccivora populations collected from Robinia sp. (locust), whereas the symbiont Hamiltonella was almost exclusively found in A. craccivora populations from Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Aphids collected from these two food plants also had divergent mitochondrial haplotypes, potentially indicating the formation of specialized aphid lineages associated with food plant (host-associated differentiation). The role of facultative symbionts in this process remains to be determined. Overall, observed facultative symbiont prevalence in A. craccivora was lower than that of some other well-studied aphids (e.g., Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum), possibly as a consequence of A. craccivoras almost purely parthenogenetic life history. Finally, most (70 %) of the surveyed populations were polymorphic for facultative symbiont infection, indicating that even when symbiont prevalence is relatively low, symbiont-associated phenotypic variation may allow population-level evolutionary responses to local selection.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.