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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
T-helper 17 cell cytokines and interferon type I: partners in crime in systemic lupus erythematosus?
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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A hallmark of systemic autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the increased expression of interferon (IFN) type I inducible genes, so-called IFN type I signature. Recently, T-helper 17 subset (Th17 cells), which produces IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22, has been implicated in SLE. As CCR6 enriches for Th17 cells, we used this approach to investigate whether CCR6? memory T-helper cells producing IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and/or IL-22 are increased in SLE patients and whether this increase is related to the presence of IFN type I signature.
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Absence of interleukin-17 receptor a signaling prevents autoimmune inflammation of the joint and leads to a Th2-like phenotype in collagen-induced arthritis.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2014
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Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) signals through the IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) A/C heterodimer. IL-17RA serves as a common receptor subunit for several IL-17 cytokine family members. Lack of IL-17RA signaling may therefore have additional effects beyond those of lack of IL-17A alone. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of IL-17RA signaling in autoimmune arthritis.
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IL-23 dependent and independent stages of experimental arthritis: no clinical effect of therapeutic IL-23p19 inhibition in collagen-induced arthritis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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IL-23p19 deficient mice have revealed a critical role of IL-23 in the development of experimental autoimmune diseases, such as collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Neutralizing IL-23 after onset of CIA in rats has been shown to reduce paw volume, but the effect on synovial inflammation and the immunological autoimmune response is not clear. In this study, we examined the role of IL-23 at different stages of CIA and during T cell memory mediated flare-up arthritis with focus on changes in B cell activity and Th1/Th17 modulation. Anti-IL-23p19 antibody (anti-IL23p19) treatment, starting 15 days after the type II collagen (CII)-immunization but before clinical signs of disease onset, significantly suppressed the severity of CIA. This was accompanied with significantly lower CII-specific IgG1 levels and lower IgG2a levels in the anti-IL-23p19 treated mice compared to the control group. Importantly, neutralizing IL-23 after the first signs of CIA did not ameliorate the disease. This was in contrast to arthritic mice that underwent an arthritis flare-up since a significantly lower disease score was observed in the IL-23p19 treated mice compared to the control group, accompanied by lower synovial IL-17A and IL-22 expression in the knee joints of these mice. These data show IL-23-dependent and IL-23-independent stages during autoimmune CIA. Furthermore, the memory T cell mediated flare-up arthritis is IL-23-mediated. These data suggest that specific neutralization of IL-23p19 after onset of autoimmune arthritis may not be beneficial as a therapeutic therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, T cell mediated arthritis relapses in patients with RA might be controlled by anti-IL-23p19 treatment.
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IL-17/Th17 mediated synovial inflammation is IL-22 independent.
Ann. Rheum. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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Interleukin (IL)-17A and Th17 cells are critically involved in T cell-mediated synovial inflammation. Besides IL-17A, Th17 cells produce IL-22. Recently, Th22 cells were discovered, which produce IL-22 in the absence of IL-17. However, it remains unclear whether IL-22 and Th22 cells contribute to T cell-mediated synovial inflammation. Therefore, we examined the potential of IL-22 and Th22 cells to induce synovial inflammation and whether IL-22 is required for T cell-mediated experimental arthritis.
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Btk levels set the threshold for B-cell activation and negative selection of autoreactive B cells in mice.
Blood
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On antigen binding by the B-cell receptor (BCR), B cells up-regulate protein expression of the key downstream signaling molecule Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk), but the effects of Btk up-regulation on B-cell function are unknown. Here, we show that transgenic mice overexpressing Btk specifically in B cells spontaneously formed germinal centers and manifested increased plasma cell numbers, leading to antinuclear autoantibody production and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoimmune pathology affecting kidneys, lungs, and salivary glands. Autoimmunity was fully dependent on Btk kinase activity, because Btk inhibitor treatment (PCI-32765) could normalize B-cell activation and differentiation, and because autoantibodies were absent in Btk transgenic mice overexpressing a kinase inactive Btk mutant. B cells overexpressing wild-type Btk were selectively hyperresponsive to BCR stimulation and showed enhanced Ca(2+) influx, nuclear factor (NF)-?B activation, resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis, and defective elimination of selfreactive B cells in vivo. These findings unravel a crucial role for Btk in setting the threshold for B-cell activation and counterselection of autoreactive B cells, making Btk an attractive therapeutic target in systemic autoimmune disease such as SLE. The finding of in vivo pathology associated with Btk overexpression may have important implications for the development of gene therapy strategies for X-linked agammaglobulinemia, the immunodeficiency associated with mutations in BTK.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.