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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Early-loaded laser-sintered versus acid-etched one-piece dental implants for mandibular premolars replacement: a preliminary study.
Implant Dent
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2014
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Early loading of dental implants can simplify treatment and increase patient's satisfaction. This 1-year preliminary clinical trial aimed to clinically and radiographically evaluate early-loaded one-piece implants that had either laser-sintered or acid-etched surfaces.
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WITHDRAWN: Effect of different dentin cleaning techniques on bond strength and the micromorphology of dentin/self-adhesive resin cement interface.
J Prosthet Dent
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2014
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This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.
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WITHDRAWN: Effect of post space conditioning and luting resin on the retentive strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin posts.
J Prosthet Dent
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2014
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This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.
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Immediate Implant Placement into Fresh Extraction Socket in the Mandibular Molar Sites: A Preliminary Study of a Modified Insertion Technique.
Clin Implant Dent Relat Res
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2013
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Immediate implant insertion in mandibular molar extraction sockets raises a series of challenges for clinicians.
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Evaluation of oral tissue response and blood levels of mercury released from dental amalgam in rats.
Arch. Oral Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2013
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Dental amalgam is the most common restorative material used in dentistry. It was reported that amalgam might constitute potential toxic hazards to pregnant patients and foetuses through mercury release and absorption. The present study aimed to investigate the vital tissue response in contact to dental amalgam plus determination of blood mercury levels in mother and offspring Wistar strain albino rats. Pregnant mothers were divided into two main groups each had dental amalgam implanted into either an oral mucosa incision or a bony socket following extraction. Third and fourth groups included the offspring rats of mothers from the first and second groups, respectively. The blood mercury levels and histopathology of oral tissues were analyzed in mothers at one and six months post-implantation and in offspring rats one day after birth. The blood mercury levels of mothers increased significantly at six months (P<0.01) as compared to levels at one month. However, blood mercury levels were not significant (P>0.05) when the two offspring (third and fourth) groups were compared. Histopathology results from mothers showed inflammatory response at the bottom of the socket, one month after amalgam implantation. At six months, teeth germs showed vacuolation of the abnormal odontoblasts with globular dentine formation. Degenerated periodontal fibres and thin trabeculae forming the bony sockets with large marrow spaces were evident. A fibrous connective tissue capsule surrounded the amalgam mass inside the mucosa of mothers at one month and was evident also at 6 months with a huge inflammatory cell infiltrate. Teeth germs showed elongated odontoblasts with intercellular oedema, thinner dentine and bony trabeculae with wider marrow spaces. Offspring rats showed comparable oral tissue response.
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LASER Sintered One-Piece Early-Loaded Dental Implants for Mandibular Premolars Replacement.
J Oral Implantol
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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Abstract Objective: This study was designed to evaluate laser-sintered early-loaded one-piece implants (OPI) based on clinical and radiographic findings. Materials and Methods: Thirty OPI were placed in the mandibular premolar area and subjected to early loading after 3 weeks of initial placement and patients were followed up for 6 months. Clinical evaluation included pocket depth, gingival health, implant stability and esthetics. Periapical radiographs were used to measure the marginal bone loss (MBL). Results: All implants were considered successful resulting in a survival rate of 100%. A remarkable difference (P < 0.01) existed when comparing MBL levels at 1 month with those at 3 and 6 months. Significant differences (P < 0.01) existed when comparing implant stability at 1 month to 3 months and at 3 months to 6 months. Moreover, significant differences (P < 0.01) were observed when comparing peri-implant probing depth at 1 month to that at 3 and 6 months on both the mesial and distal sides. The mean value of pink esthetic score was 11 at time of final restoration. Conclusions: The laser-treated early-loaded OPI design is associated with satisfactory clinical and radiographic follow up results and it is a good alternative to the two-piece design.
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Paracrine effects of bone marrow soup restore organ function, regeneration, and repair in salivary glands damaged by irradiation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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There are reports that bone marrow cell (BM) transplants repaired irradiated salivary glands (SGs) and re-established saliva secretion. However, the mechanisms of action behind these reports have not been elucidated.
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Apoptotic effect of different self-etch dental adhesives on odontoblasts in cell cultures.
Arch. Oral Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2011
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We aimed to evaluate the potential cytotoxicity (apoptosis-induction) of three types of self-etch dental adhesives: two-component one-step (Xeno III), two-component two-steps (Clearfil Protect Bond) and one-component one-step (Xeno V) on cultured odontoblasts.
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Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured with salivary gland biopsies adopt an epithelial phenotype.
Stem Cells Dev.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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Sjogrens syndrome and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer result in severe xerostomia and irreversible salivary gland damage for which no effective treatment is currently available. Cell culture methods of primary human salivary gland epithelial cells (huSGs) are slow and cannot provide a sufficient number of cells. In addition, the majority of cultured huSGs are of a ductal phenotype and thus not fluid/saliva secretory cells. Some reports indicated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possessed the potential to differentiate into epithelial cells. To test this hypothesis with huSGs, a coculture system containing 2 chambers separated by a polyester membrane was used to study the capacity of human MSCs to adopt an epithelial phenotype when cocultured with human salivary gland biopsies. Results were that 20%-40% of cocultured MSCs expressed tight junction proteins [claudin-1 (CLDN-1), -2, -3, and -4; occludin; junctional adhesion molecule-A; and zonula occludens-1] as well as other epithelial markers [aquaporin-5, ?-amylase (?-AMY), and E-cadherin], and generated a higher transepithelial electrical resistance. Electron microscopy demonstrated that these MSCs had comparable cellular structures to huSGs, such as tight junction structures and numerous secretory granules. Quantitative real time (RT)-polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation of several salivary genes (aquaporin-5, AMY, and CLDN-2). Moreover, the amounts of ?-AMY detected in cocultured MSCs were comparable to those detected in huSGs control cultures. These data suggest that cocultured MSCs can demonstrate a temporary change into a salivary gland acinar phenotype.
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Matrigel improves functional properties of primary human salivary gland cells.
Tissue Eng Part A
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Currently, there is no effective treatment available to patients with irreversible loss of functional salivary acini caused by Sjogrens syndrome or after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. A tissue-engineered artificial salivary gland would help these patients. The graft cells for this device must establish tight junctions in addition to being of fluid-secretory nature. This study analyzed a graft source from human salivary glands (huSG) cultured on Matrigel. Cells were obtained from parotid and submandibular glands, expanded in vitro, and then plated on either Matrigel-coated (2 mg/mL) or uncoated culture dish. Immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and transepithelial electrical resistance were employed. On Matrigel, huSG cells adopted an acinar phenotype by forming three-dimensional acinar-like units (within 24 h of plating) as well as a monolayer of cells. On uncoated surfaces (plastic), huSG cells only formed monolayers of ductal cells. Both types of culture conditions allowed huSG cells to express tight junction proteins (claudin-1, -2, -3, -4; occludin; JAM-A; and ZO-1) and adequate transepithelial electrical resistance. Importantly, 99% of huSG cells on Matrigel expressed ?-amylase and the water channel protein Aquaporin-5, as compared to <5% of huSG cells on plastic. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed an acinar phenotype with many secretory granules. Matrigel increased the secretion of ?-amylase two to five folds into the media, downregulated certain salivary genes, and regulated the translation of acinar proteins. This three-dimensional in vitro serum-free cell culture method allows the organization and differentiation of huSG cells into salivary cells with an acinar phenotype.
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Matrigel improves functional properties of human submandibular salivary gland cell line.
Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2011
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Sjogrens syndrome and radiotherapy for head and neck cancers result in irreversible damage to functional salivary tissue, for which no adequate treatment is available. The microenvironment for salivary gland cell cytodifferentiation is critical for the future development of salivary gland regeneration, repair and tissue engineering treatments. Results from this study indicate that human submandibular cell line (HSG) cultured on Matrigel (2mg/ml) could be induced to differentiate into polarized secretory acinar-like cells. The HSG cells grown on Matrigel were evaluated by physiological functional assays, molecular and immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and morphological assessments. The results showed (1) a decrease in cell proliferation; (2) an increase in cell apoptosis; (3) cellular polarization evident by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), expressions of tight junction proteins (claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, occludin, JAM-A, and ZO-1) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); (4) an increase in the production and/or secretion of acinar cell proteins, i.e., alpha-amylase, aquaporin-5, cytokeratins, and mucin-1, that were not associated with increases in mRNA transcription; (5) a decrease in vimentin expression; and (6) expression of potential stem cell biomarkers CD44 and CD166. The data indicated that Matrigel provided a suitable microenvironment for morphological and functional differentiation of HSG cells into 3D acinar like cells. This study provides an in vitro model and baseline data on future developments of new strategies for salivary gland regeneration and replacement.
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Bone marrow-derived cells rescue salivary gland function in mice with head and neck irradiation.
Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2010
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Treatment for most patients with head and neck cancers includes ionizing radiation. A consequence of this treatment is irreversible damage to salivary glands (SGs), which is accompanied by a loss of fluid-secreting acinar-cells and a considerable decrease of saliva output. While there are currently no adequate conventional treatments for this condition, cell-based therapies are receiving increasing attention to regenerate SGs. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) can differentiate into salivary epithelial cells and restore SG function in head and neck irradiated mice. BMDCs from male mice were transplanted into the tail-vein of 18Gy-irradiated female mice. Salivary output was increased in mice that received BMDCs transplantation at week 8 and 24 post-irradiation. At 24 weeks after irradiation (IR), harvested SGs (submandibular and parotid glands) of BMDC-treated mice had greater weights than those of non-treated mice. Histological analysis shows that SGs of treated mice demonstrated an increased level of tissue regenerative activity such as blood vessel formation and cell proliferation, while apoptotic activity was increased in non-transplanted mice. The expression of stem cell markers (Sca-1 or c-kit) was detected in BMDC-treated SGs. Finally, we detected an increased ratio of acinar-cell area and approximately 9% of Y-chromosome-positive (donor-derived) salivary epithelial cells in BMDC-treated mice. We propose here that cell therapy using BMDCs can rescue the functional damage of irradiated SGs by direct differentiation of donor BMDCs into salivary epithelial cells.
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Bone marrow cells are a source of undifferentiated cells to prevent Sjögrens syndrome and to preserve salivary glands function in the non-obese diabetic mice.
Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2010
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Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop Sjögrens-like syndrome (Ss) and a gradual loss of saliva secretory function. Our previous study showed that injections of matched normal spleen cells with Complete Freunds Adjuvant (CFA) reversed salivary gland dysfunction in 14-week-old NOD mice, which had established Ss. The spleen and bone marrow are closely related organs, and both are among the first sites of hematopoiesis during gestation. Noticing a rapidly increasing number of clinical trials using bone marrow (BM) cells treatments for autoimmune diseases, we tested if BM cells can prevent Ss and restore salivary glands function. We injected CFA and MHC class I-matched normal BM cells in 7-week-old NOD mice, which had not yet developed Ss. We found at week 52 post-treatment that all NOD mice receiving BM cells and CFA had a recovery of salivary flow and were protected from Ss and diabetes. BM cells-treated mice had their salivary function restored quantitatively and qualitatively. Saliva flow was higher (p<0.05) in BM cells-transplanted mice when compared to control mice, which continued to deteriorate over time. Total proteins, epidermal growth factor, amylase, and electrolytes concentrations in saliva of BM cells-treated mice were not significantly changed at week 44 and 52 post-therapy when compared to pre-therapy (when the mice did not have Ss). Restoration of salivary flow could have resulted from a combination of rescue and paracrine effects from BM cells. This study suggests that a combined immuno- and cell-based therapy can permanently prevent Ss and restored salivary function in NOD mice.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.