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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Plerixafor and Abbreviated-Course Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Mobilizing Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in Light Chain Amyloidosis.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2014
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Cytokine-based mobilization in light chain (AL) amyloidosis is frequently complicated by fluid overload, weight gain, cardiac arrhythmias, and peri-mobilization mortality. We analyzed hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) mobilization outcomes in 49 consecutive AL amyloidosis patients at our institution between 2004 and 2013 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G) (10 ?g/kg/day) (n = 25) versus an institutional protocol to limit G exposure using plerixafor (P) (.24 mg/kg s.c. starting day 3 of G 10 ?g/kg) (n = 24). G+P strategy yielded higher total CD34(+) cells/kg (12.8 × 10(6) versus 6.3 × 10(6); P < .001) and CD34(+) cells/kg collected on day 1 (10.8 × 10(6) versus 4.9 × 10(6), P = .004) compared with the G cohort. More G+P patients collected ?5 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (22 versus 16, P = .02) and ? 10 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (13 versus 5, P = .01). Four patients (16%) had mobilization failure with G; none with G+P. Peri-mobilization weight gain was lower with G+P strategy (median weight gain 1 versus 7 pounds, P = .009). Numbers of apheresis sessions (median, 1 versus 1, P = .52), number of hospitalization days (median, 1.1 versus 1.6, P = .52), transfusions, use of intravenous antibiotics, and cardiac arrhythmias were similar. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that upfront use of G+P as a mobilization strategy results in superior HPC collection, no mobilization failures, and less weight gain than G alone.
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A randomized phase II trial of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus after non-myeloablative unrelated donor transplantation.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
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The study is a randomized phase II trial investigating graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis after non-myeloablative (90 mg/m(2) fludarabine and 2 Gy total body irradiation) human leukocyte antigen matched unrelated donor transplantation. Patients were randomized as follows: arm 1 - tacrolimus 180 days and mycophenolate mofetil 95 days (n=69); arm 2 - tacrolimus 150 days and mycophenolate mofetil 180 days (n=71); arm 3 - tacrolimus 150 days, mycophenolate mofetil 180 days and sirolimus 80 days (n=68). All patients had sustained engraftment. Grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease rates in the 3 arms were 64%, 48% and 47% at Day 150, respectively (arm 3 vs. arm 1 (hazard ratio 0.62; P=0.04). Owing to the decreased incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease, systemic steroid use was lower at Day 150 in arm 3 (32% vs. 55% in arm 1 and 49% in arm 2; overall P=0.009 by hazard ratio analysis). The Day 150 incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation was lower in arm 3 (arm 1, 54%; arm 2, 47%; arm 3, 22%; overall P=0.002 by hazard ratio analysis). Non-relapse mortality was comparable in the three arms at two years (arm 1, 26%; arm 2, 23%; arm 3, 18%). Toxicity rates and other outcome measures were similar between the three arms. The addition of sirolimus to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil is safe and associated with lower incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease and cytomegalovirus reactivation. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00105001).
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Early Failure of Frontline Rituximab-Containing Chemo-immunotherapy in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Does Not Predict Futility of Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2014
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The poor prognosis for patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who relapse within 1 year of initial diagnosis after first-line rituximab-based chemo-immunotherapy has created controversy about the role of autologous transplantation (HCT) in this setting. We compared autologous HCT outcomes for chemosensitive DLBCL patients between 2000 and 2011 in 2 cohorts based on time to relapse from diagnosis. The early rituximab failure (ERF) cohort consisted of patients with primary refractory disease or those with first relapse within 1 year of initial diagnosis. The ERF cohort was compared with those relapsing >1 year after initial diagnosis (late rituximab failure [LRF] cohort). ERF and LRF cohorts included 300 and 216 patients, respectively. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM), progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) of ERF versus LRF cohorts at 3 years were 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6% to 13%) versus 9% (95% CI, 5% to 13%), 47% (95% CI, 41% to 52%) versus 39% (95% CI, 33% to 46%), 44% (95% CI, 38% to 50%) versus 52% (95% CI, 45% to 59%), and 50% (95% CI, 44% to 56%) versus 67% (95% CI, 60% to 74%), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ERF was not associated with higher NRM (relative risk [RR], 1.31; P = .34). The ERF cohort had a higher risk of treatment failure (progression/relapse or death) (RR, 2.08; P < .001) and overall mortality (RR, 3.75; P <.001) within the first 9 months after autologous HCT. Beyond this period, PFS and OS were not significantly different between the ERF and LRF cohorts. Autologous HCT provides durable disease control to a sizeable subset of DLBCL despite ERF (3-year PFS, 44%) and remains the standard-of-care in chemosensitive DLBCL regardless of the timing of disease relapse.
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Efficacy of bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone in treatment-naïve patients with high-risk cardiac AL amyloidosis (Mayo Clinic stage III).
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2014
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Bortezomib is an active agent in AL amyloidosis and responses to this drug in combination with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone are both rapid and deep. Here we present an international, multicenter series of 60 patients with Mayo Clinic stage III cardiac amyloidosis to assess the impact of this regimen in improving outcomes in this poor-risk group. The median follow-up for the entire cohort is 11.8 months. The overall response rate was 68%. In a landmark analysis, examining patients who survived more than 3 months, the overall response rate was 86%. A cardiac response was seen in 32% of patients. The estimated 1-year survival rate for the whole cohort was 57% and 24 patients (40%) died while on therapy. Although unable to save the poorest risk patients, the combination of bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone can achieve a high number of hematologic and cardiac responses, likely improving overall survival and justifying a prospective trial.
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Older patients with myeloma derive similar benefit from autologous transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for plasma cell myeloma is performed less often in people >70 years old than in people ?70 years old. We analyzed 11,430 AHCT recipients for plasma cell myeloma prospectively reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 2008 and 2011, representing the majority of US AHCT activity during this period. Survival (OS) was compared in 3 cohorts: ages 18 to 59 years (n = 5818), 60 to 69 years (n = 4666), and >70 years (n = 946). Median OS was not reached for any cohort. In multivariate analysis, increasing age was associated with mortality (P = .0006). Myeloma-specific mortality was similar among cohorts at 12%, indicating an age-related effect on nonmyeloma mortality. Analyses were performed in a representative subgroup comparing relapse rate, progression-free survival (PFS), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). One-year NRM was 0% for age >70 years and 2% for other ages (P = not significant). The three-year relapse rate was 56% in age 18 to 59 years, 61% in age 60 to 69 years, and 63% age >70 (P = not significant). Three-year PFS was similar at 42% in age 18 to 59 years, 38% in age 60 to 69 years, and 33% in age >70 years (P = not significant). Postrelapse survival was significantly worse for the older cohort (P = .03). Older subjects selected for AHCT derived similar antimyeloma benefit without worse NRM, relapse rate, or PFS.
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Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in older persons: respecting the heterogeneity of age.
Expert Rev Hematol
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2014
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Demographic trends establish that older adults are the fastest growing segment of population, with over 19% of the population expected to be aged >65 years by 2030. As the risk for hematologic malignancies increases with age, it is imperative that our field continues to strive to individualize and manage risk and benefit in an aging population. While hematologic diseases are more common in the elderly, only a small minority of patients with hematological malignancy aged >65 years receive allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, relative to the burden of disease in this population. In this editorial we explore some of the obstacles to transplantation, the rationale to consider the procedure in the older adult and ways that the stem cell consultative process can be individualized. Finally, we outline key areas where additional research is needed.
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Outcomes in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma in a phase I study of everolimus in combination with lenalidomide.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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Everolimus, an oral mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, has been studied in multiple myeloma (MM) but lacks significant single agent activity. Based on preclinical studies showing synergistic activity of mTOR inhibitors with lenalidomide, we studied the combination of lenalidomide and everolimus in relapsed or refractory MM in a phase I clinical trial. We assessed patient samples using gene expression, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry to probe the mTOR pathway. Twenty-six patients were evaluable for toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicities included grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The maximum tolerated dose was lenalidomide 15 mg and everolimus 5 mg for 21 d with a 7 d rest period. Grade 3/4 adverse events included thrombocytopenia (35%) and neutropenia (42%). The overall response rate was 65% (1 complete response + 4 partial response + 10 minimal response). The median progression-free survival was 5·5 months and median overall survival was 29·5 months. Biomarker data demonstrated downregulation of phosphorylated p70S6K. Gene expression profiling suggested activation of mTOR in responders versus non-responders. The combination of lenalidomide and everolimus was well tolerated with predictable toxicities and showed responses in a heavily pretreated population. When confirmed with larger patient numbers, this analysis may guide patient selection for future clinical trials of mTOR inhibition in MM.
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Incidence and outcomes of Clostridium difficile-associated disease in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.
Int. J. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at a high risk of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) given frequent hospitalizations, prolonged antibiotic usage and altered integrity of intestinal mucosa. The prevalence and trends of CDAD in HSCT patients have not been extensively studied. In this study, the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify CDAD in HSCT patients using a nationwide inpatient sample in the United States from 2000 to 2009. The prevalence of CDAD and in-hospital mortality in HSCT were investigated and compared to those without any transplants. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify if BMT and graft versus host disease (GVHD) were independently associated with mortality in CDAD patients. Of the 344,507 HSCT discharges, 4.7 % had CDAD. This was about 5 times higher when compared to non-transplant discharges. During engraftment admission, rates of CDAD were higher in allogenic group (8.4 vs. 5.7 %, p < 0.001). In subsequent admissions, those with GVHD had higher rates of CDAD (5.7 vs. 3.2 %, p < 0.001). On adjusted analysis in patients with CDAD, during engraftment admission, allogenic group had significantly higher mortality when compared with non-transplants (OR 3.7). Notably, there was no significant difference in mortality between patients with and without CDAD during the engraftment period for the allogeneic group. In subsequent admissions, there was higher mortality in those with GVHD (OR 4.8). Though the prevalence of CDAD in non-transplant population doubled (from 0.44 % in 2000 to 0.99 % in 2008), it has remained stable in HSCT patients (from 4.8 % in 2000 to 5.6 % in 2008). HSCT and GVHD are independently associated with CDAD though its presence does not affect mortality.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia: Current state in 2013 and future directions.
World J Stem Cells
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2014
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Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of high-grade myeloid neoplasms of the elderly with variable outcomes. Though remission-induction is an important first step in the management of AML, additional treatment strategies are essential to ensure long-term disease-free survival. Recent pivotal advances in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of AML have allowed for a risk-adapted approach in its management based on relapse-risk. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective therapeutic strategy in AML providing the possibility of cure with potent graft-versus-leukemia reactions, with a demonstrable survival advantage in younger patients with intermediate- or poor-risk cytogenetics. Herein we review the published data regarding the role of allo-HCT in adults with AML. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE/Ovid. In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and ongoing trial databases. We discuss the role of allo-HCT in AML patients stratified by cytogenetic- and molecular-risk in first complete remission, as well as allo-HCT as an option in relapsed/refractory AML. Besides the conventional sibling and unrelated donor allografts, we review the available data and recent advances for alternative donor sources such as haploidentical grafts and umbilical cord blood. We also discuss conditioning regimens, including reduced intensity conditioning which has broadened the applicability of allo-HCT. Finally we explore recent advances and future possibilities and directions of allo-HCT in AML. Practical therapeutic recommendations have been made where possible based on available data and expert opinion.
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Lenalidomide maintenance for high-risk multiple myeloma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1 to 21 of 28 days cycles, with intrapatient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age, 54 years) with high-risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009 and 2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (range, 66 to 171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%). Most common reasons for discontinuation were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of LEN was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplantation-related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN after alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although it is associated with a 38% incidence of acute GVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high-risk MM population warrant further study of this approach.
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Autologous or Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Chemotherapy-Sensitive Mantle-Cell Lymphoma: Analysis of Transplantation Timing and Modality.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2013
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To examine the outcomes of patients with chemotherapy-sensitive mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL) following a first hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HCT), comparing outcomes with autologous (auto) versus reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic (RIC allo) HCT and with transplantation applied at different times in the disease course.
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Nanoliposomes protect against AL amyloid light chain protein-induced endothelial injury.
J Liposome Res
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2013
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Abstract Context: A newly-recognized pathogenic mechanism underlying light chain amyloidosis (AL) involves endothelial dysfunction and cell injury caused by misfolded light chain proteins (LC). Nanoliposomes (NL) are artificial phospholipid vesicles that could attach to misfolded proteins and reduce tissue injury. Objective: To test whether co-treatment with NL reduces LC-induced endothelial dysfunction and cell death. Methods: Abdominal subcutaneous adipose arterioles from 14 non-AL subjects were cannulated; dilator response to acetylcholine and papaverine were measured at baseline and following 1-hour exposure to LC (20?µg/mL, 2 purified from AL subjects urine, 1 from human recombinant LC [AL-09])?±?NL (phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol/phosphatidic acid 70/25/5 molar ratio) or NL alone. Human aortic artery endothelial cells (HAEC) were exposed to Oregon Green-labeled LC?±?NL for 24 hours and intracellular LC and apoptosis (Hoechst stain) were measured. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was performed on AL-09 LC?±?NL to follow changes in secondary structure and protein thermal stability. Results: LC caused impaired dilation to acetylcholine that was restored by NL (control - 94.0?±?1.8%, LC - 65.0?±?7.1%, LC?+?NL - 95.3?±?1.8%, p???0.001 LC versus control or LC?+?NL). NL protection was inhibited by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. NL increased the beta sheet structure of LC, reduced endothelial cell internalization of LC and protected against LC-induced endothelial cell death. Conclusions: LC induced human adipose arteriole endothelial dysfunction and endothelial cell death, which were reversed by co-treatment with NL. This protection may partly be due to enhancing LC protein structure and reducing LC internalization. Nanoliposomes represent a promising new class of agents to ameliorate tissue injury from protein misfolding diseases such as AL.
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Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Comorbidity Index is predictive of survival after Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
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Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) but is associated with morbidity and non-relapse mortality (NRM). Hematopoietic cell transplant comorbidity index (HCT-CI) was shown to predict risk of NRM and survival after allogeneic transplantation. We tested the utility of HCT-CI as a predictor of NRM and survival in patients with MM undergoing AHCT.
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Proceedings from the National Cancer Institutes Second International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Part II. Autologous Transplantation-Novel Agents and Immunomodulatory Strateg
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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In the National Cancer Institutes Second International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, the Scientific/Educational Session on Autologous Transplantation addressed the role of novel agents and immunomodulatory strategies in management of relapse after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Concepts were illustrated through in-depth discussion of multiple myeloma, with broader discussion of areas relevant for relapse of other malignancies as well as in the setting of allogeneic transplantation. Dr. Hari provided an overview of the epidemiology of relapse after AHSCT in multiple myeloma, addressing clinical patterns, management implications, and treatment options at relapse, highlighting the implications of novel therapeutic agents in initial, maintenance, and relapse treatment. Dr. Avigan discussed current concepts in tumor vaccine design, including whole cell and antigen-specific strategies, use of an AHSCT platform to reverse tumor-associated immunosuppression and tolerance, and combining vaccines with immunomodulatory agents to promote establishment of durable antitumor immunity. Dr. Hsu reviewed the immunogenetics of natural killer (NK) cells and general NK biology, the clinical importance of autologous NK activity (eg, lymphoma and neuroblastoma), the impact of existing therapies on promotion of NK cell activity (eg, immunomodulatory drugs, monoclonal antibodies), and strategies for enhancing autologous and allogeneic NK cell effects through NK cell gene profiling.
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Reduced-intensity hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with primary myelofibrosis: a cohort analysis from the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2013
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We evaluated outcomes and associated prognostic factors in 233 patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for primary myelofibrosis (MF) using reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). The median age at RIC HCT was 55 yr. Donors were a matched sibling donor (MSD) in 34% of RIC HCTs, an HLA well-matched unrelated donor (URD) in 45%, and a partially matched/mismatched URD in 21%. Risk stratification according to the Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS) was 12% low, 49% intermediate-1, 37% intermediate-2, and 1% high. The probability of survival at 5 yr was 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40% to 53%). In a multivariate analysis, donor type was the sole independent factor associated with survival. Adjusted probabilities of survival at 5-yr were 56% (95% CI, 44% to 67%) for MSD, 48% (95% CI, 37% to 58%) for well-matched URD, and 34% (95% CI, 21% to 47%) for partially matched/mismatched URD (P = .002). The relative risk (RR) for NRM was 3.92 (P = .006) for well-matched URD and 9.37 (P < .0001) for partially matched/mismatched URD. Trends toward increased NRM (RR, 1.7; P = .07) and inferior survival (RR, 1.37; P = .10) were observed in DIPSS intermediate-2/high-risk patients compared with DIPSS low/intermediate-1 risk patients. Our data indicate that RIC HCT is a potentially curative option for patients with MF, and that donor type is the most important factor influencing survival in these patients.
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Simplified validated prognostic model for progression-free survival after autologous transplantation for hodgkin lymphoma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2013
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Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) prognostic models based on factors measured at time of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) are limited by small sample sizes. Models based on information at diagnosis are often not uniformly collected or available at transplantation. We propose an easily implementable prognostic model for progression-free survival (PFS) post-AHCT based on factors available at transplantation in a large international cohort of HL patients. The outcomes of 728 AHCT recipients for relapsed/refractory HL were studied. Patients were randomly selected for model development (n = 337) and validation (n = 391). The multivariate model identified 4 major adverse risk factors at the time of AHCT with the following relative weights: Karnofsky performance score <90 and chemotherapy resistance at AHCT were each assigned 1 point, whereas at least 3 chemotherapy regimens pre-AHCT and extranodal disease at AHCT were each assigned 2 points. Based on the total score summed for the 4 adverse risk factors, 3 risk groups were identified: low (score = 0), intermediate (score = 1 to 3), or high (score = 4 to 6). The 4-year PFS for the low- (n = 176), intermediate- (n = 261), and high- (n = 283) risk groups were 71% (95% confidence interval [CI], 63% to 78%), 60% (95% CI, 53% to 66%), and 42% (95% CI, 36% to 49%), respectively. The prognostic model was validated in an independent cohort. The Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research model is based on factors easily available at the time of AHCT and discriminates patients with favorable post-AHCT outcomes as well as an intermediate-risk group. This model should assist in the prospective evaluation of alternative treatment strategies.
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Trends in utilization and outcomes of autologous transplantation as early therapy for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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The impact of novel drugs for treating multiple myeloma (MM) on the utilization and outcomes of autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (AHPCT) is unknown. We reviewed characteristics and outcomes of 20,278 patients who underwent AHPCT within 12 months of diagnosis of MM in the United States and Canada and registered at the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) in 3 time cohorts reflecting the increasing availability of novel drugs: 1995 to 1999 (n = 2226), 2000 to 2004 (n = 6408), and 2005 to 2010 (n = 11,644). In the United States, the number of AHPCTs performed increased at a greater rate than new MM cases. Patients in recent cohorts were older, less likely to have stage 3 MM, and more likely to have received previous thalidomide, lenalidomide, or bortezomib. On multivariate analysis, AHPCT in the 2000 to 2004 cohort (HR = 0.77) or in the 2005 to 2010 cohort (HR = 0.68) were associated with lower risk of death. Survival at 60 months post-AHPCT improved from 47% in 1995 to 1999 to 55% in 2000 to 2004 and to 57% in 2005 to 2010, owing less to improvement in progression-free survival (50% versus 55% versus 57% at 24 months) than to postrelapse/progression survival (58% versus 65% versus 72% at 24 months). AHPCT and new biological agents are complementary, nonredundant therapies and should be combined in the management of MM in suitable patients.
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Divergent effects of novel immunomodulatory agents and cyclophosphamide on the risk of engraftment syndrome after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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Engraftment syndrome (ES) is an increasingly observed and occasionally fatal complication after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). In this study, we demonstrate that the incidence of ES is significantly increased in patients undergoing autologous PBSCT for multiple myeloma in comparison to patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that age > 60 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 2.62; P = .013) and transplantation for multiple myeloma (HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.60 to 4.90; P = .0003) were associated with an increased risk of this complication. When stratified for myeloma patients only, age > 60 (HR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.87; P = .013) and prior treatment with both lenalidomide and bortezomib (HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.11 to 3.04; P = .0001) were associated with an increased incidence of ES. Conversely, lack of exposure to cyclophosphamide from either chemomobilization or as a component of the pretransplantation therapeutic regimen increased the risk of this complication (HR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.91 to 4.87; P <.0001). These studies demonstrate that the pretransplantation exposure of multiple myeloma patients to novel immunomodulatory agents and cyclophosphamide significantly affects the subsequent risk of developing ES.
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Intermittent zoledronic Acid prevents bone loss in adults after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2013
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Bone mineral density (BMD) loss is common in survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). We performed a multicenter, phase II, randomized open-label trial of intravenous zoledronic acid (ZA) to prevent BMD loss in adult recipients of alloHCT with osteopenia before HCT. The treatment group received ZA 4 mg intravenously within 28 days pre-HCT and at 3 and 6 months after HCT. Both treatment and control groups received calcium carbonate and vitamin D supplements. Of 61 patients, 32 were randomized to the ZA cohort and 29 to the control cohorts. More patients in the ZA group had an HCT comorbidity index high-risk score of ?3 (50% versus 21%, P < .01). Baseline BMD, T-scores, serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and urine N-telopeptide (UNTX) levels were similar in both cohorts. Thirty patients were evaluable for outcomes (11 from the treatment and 19 from the control group). At 12 months, subjects in the treatment group had an improvement in BMD at the femoral neck (mean change, .018 for ZA group versus -.054 for controls; P = .04) and a significant decline in levels of UNTX (-56 for ZA group versus -9 for control; P = .04) compared with baseline. ZA was well tolerated and not associated with any cases of osteonecrosis of jaw or renal impairment. Lower survival observed in the ZA cohort was likely related to baseline imbalance in HCT-CI scores. Intermittent ZA is effective in preserving long-term bone health in adult alloHCT recipients at risk for osteoporosis.
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Clinical and imaging predictors of 1-year and long-term mortality in light chain (AL) amyloidosis: a 5-year follow-up study.
Heart Vessels
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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Light chain amyloidosis (AL) involves multiorgan failure induced by amyloidogenic light chain proteins, and is associated with high mortality. We aimed to identify clinical, laboratory, and imaging parameters that would predict 1-year and long-term AL mortality. Forty-four biopsy-proven AL patients (61.5 ± 12 years, 20 females) underwent clinical evaluation including laboratory assays, echocardiography, and contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR, n = 31) prior to chemotherapy. Patients were prospectively followed for median duration of 62.7 months (interquartile range 35.5 months). Clinical and laboratory parameters were compared between 1-year survivors and nonsurvivors. Univariate Kaplan-Meier survival plots were calculated followed by stepwise logistic regression analysis to assess independent predictors of long-term survival. Eighteen (40.9 %) patients died within 1 year and an additional 10 subjects died during long-term follow-up. Patients who expired within 1 year presented with more advanced class of heart failure, higher alkaline phosphatase and uric acid, lower limb lead voltage on electrocardiography, shorter left ventricular ejection time (ET) on echocardiography, and a higher proportion of late gadolinium enhancement on CMR. On multivariable analysis, only ET ?240 ms on echocardiography (hazard ratio (HR) 5.07, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.83-14.1, P = 0.002) and New York Heart Association functional class II-IV presentation (HR 1.0058, 95 % CI 1.0014-1.0103, P = 0.01) were independent predictors of AL mortality. In conclusion, AL amyloidosis is associated with high 1-year and long-term mortality. Among clinical, laboratory, and imaging parameters tested, an echocardiographic finding of ET ?240 ms has independent and additive prognostic value to clinical heart failure evaluation in determining long-term survival of AL patients. This result may be important in the early identification of patients at risk.
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Fludarabine and 2-Gy TBI is superior to 2 Gy TBI as conditioning for HLA-matched related hematopoietic cell transplantation: a phase III randomized trial.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2013
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The risks and benefits of adding fludarabine to a 2-Gy total body irradiation (TBI) nonmyeloablative regimen are unknown. For this reason, we conducted a prospective randomized trial comparing 2-Gy TBI alone, or in combination with 90 mg/m(2) fludarabine (FLU/TBI), before transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells from HLA-matched related donors. Eighty-five patients with hematological malignancies were randomized to be conditioned with TBI alone (n = 44) or FLU/TBI (n = 41). All patients had initial engraftment. Two graft rejections were observed, both in the TBI group. Infection rates, nonrelapse mortality, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were similar between groups. Three-year overall survival was lower in the TBI group (54% versus 65%; hazard ratio [HR], .57; P = .09), with higher incidences of relapse/progression (55% versus 40%; HR, .55; P = .06), relapse-related mortality (37% versus 28%; HR, .53; P = .09), and a lower progression-free survival (36% versus 53%; HR, .56; P = .05). Median donor T cell chimerism levels were significantly lower in the TBI group at days 28 (61% versus 90%; P < .0001) and 84 (68% versus 92%; P < .0001), as was NK cell chimerism on day 28 (75% versus 96%; P = .0005). In conclusion, this randomized trial demonstrates the importance of fludarabine in augmenting the graft-versus-tumor effect by ensuring prompt and durable high-level donor engraftment early after transplantation.
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Graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2013
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We designed a minimal-intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies unable to tolerate high-intensity regimens because of age, serious comorbidities, or previous high-dose HCT. The regimen allows the purest assessment of graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects apart from conditioning and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) not augmented by regimen-related toxicities.
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Donor lymphocyte infusion for relapsed hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: prognostic relevance of the initial CD3+ T cell dose.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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The impact of donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) initial cell dose on its outcome is known in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia but limited in patients with other hematological malignancies. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the effect of initial DLI CD3(+) cell dose on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and overall survival after DLI given for relapse of any hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with high- or reduced-intensity conditioning. The cohort included 225 patients. Initial DLI CD3(+) cell dose per kilogram of recipient body weight was ? 1 × 10(7) (n = 84; group A), >1.0 to <10 × 10(7) (n = 58; group B), and ? 10 × 10(7) (n = 66; group C). The initial cell dose was unknown for the remaining 17 patients. Cumulative incidence rates of GVHD at 12 months after DLI were 21%, 45%, and 55% for groups A, B, and C, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that initial DLI CD3(+) cell ? 10 × 10(7) dose per kilogram is associated with an increased risk of GVHD after DLI (P = .03). Moreover, an initial DLI CD3(+) cell dose of 10 × 10(7) or higher did not decrease the risk of relapse and did not improve overall survival. Thus, these results support the use of less than 10 × 10(7) CD3(+) cell per kilogram as the initial cell dose of DLI for treatment of persistent or recurrent hematological malignancy after HCT.
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Autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma with secondary CNS involvement.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2013
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Pre-existing central nervous system (CNS) involvement may influence referral for autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The outcomes of 151 adult patients with NHL with prior secondary CNS involvement (CNS(+) ) receiving an AHCT were compared to 4688 patients without prior CNS lymphoma (CNS(-) ). There were significant baseline differences between the cohorts. CNS(+) patients were more likely to be younger, have lower performance scores, higher age-adjusted international prognostic index scores, more advanced disease stage at diagnosis, more aggressive histology, more sites of extranodal disease, and a shorter interval between diagnosis and AHCT. However, no statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups by analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. A matched pair comparison of the CNS(+) group with a subset of CNS(-) patients matched on propensity score also showed no differences in outcomes. Patients with active CNS lymphoma at the time of AHCT (n = 55) had a higher relapse rate and diminished PFS and OS compared with patients whose CNS lymphoma was in remission (n = 96) at the time of AHCT. CNS(+) patients can achieve excellent long-term outcomes with AHCT. Active CNS lymphoma at transplant confers a worse prognosis.
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Impact of pretransplantation conditioning regimens on outcomes of allogeneic transplantation for chemotherapy-unresponsive diffuse large B cell lymphoma and grade III follicular lymphoma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2013
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Patients with chemorefractory non-Hodgkin lymphomas generally have a poor prognosis. We used the observational database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research to study the outcome of 533 patients with refractory diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or grade III follicular lymphoma (FL-III) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) using either myeloablative (MA; n = 307) or reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NST; n = 226) between 1998 and 2010. We analyzed nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Only 45% of the patients at transplantation had a Karnofsky performance score of ?90%. Median follow-up of surviving patients after MA and RIC/NST allo-HCT is 35 months and 30 months, respectively. At 3 years, MA allo-HCT was associated with a higher NRM compared with RIC/NST (53% versus 42%; P = .03), similar PFS (19% versus 23%; P = .40), and lower OS (19% versus 28%; P = .02), respectively. On multivariate analysis, FL-III histology was associated with lower NRM (relative risk [RR], .52), reduced risk of relapse/progression (RR, .42), and superior PFS (RR, .51) and OS (RR, .53), whereas MA conditioning was associated with reduced risk of relapse/progression (RR, .66). Despite a refractory state, a small subset of DLBCL and FL-III patients can attain durable remissions after allo-HCT. Conditioning regimen intensity was not associated with PFS and OS despite a higher risk of relapse/progression with RIC/NST allo-HCT.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for chemotherapy-unresponsive mantle cell lymphoma: a cohort analysis from the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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Patients with chemorefractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) have a poor prognosis. We used the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database to study the outcome of 202 patients with refractory MCL who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) using either myeloablative (MA) or reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NST), during 1998-2010. We analyzed nonrelapse mortality (NRM), progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Seventy-four patients (median age, 54 years) received MA, and 128 patients (median age, 59 years) received RIC/NST. Median follow-up after allo-HCT was 35 months in the MA group and 43 months in the RIC/NST group. At 3 years post-transplantation, no significant between-group differences were seen in terms of NRM (47% in MA versus 43% in RIC/NST; P = .68), relapse/progression (33% versus 32%; P = .89), PFS (20% versus 25%; P = .53), or OS (25% versus 30%; P = .45). Multivariate analysis also revealed no significant between-group differences in NRM, relapse, PFS, or OS; however, receipt of a bone marrow or T cell-depleted allograft was associated with an increased risk of NRM and inferior PFS and OS. Our data suggest that despite a refractory disease state, approximately 25% of patients with MCL can attain durable remission after allo-HCT, and conditioning regimen intensity does not influence outcome of allo-HCT.
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Salvage second hematopoietic cell transplantation in myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2013
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Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) as initial therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) improves survival. However, data to support this approach for relapsed/progressive disease after initial AHCT (AHCT1) are limited. Using Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data, we report the outcomes of 187 patients who underwent a second AHCT (AHCT2) for the treatment of relapsed/progressive MM. Planned tandem AHCT was excluded. Median age at AHCT2 was 59 years (range, 28 to 72), and median patient follow-up was 47 months (range, 3 to 97). Nonrelapse mortality after AHCT2 was 2% at 1 year and 4% at 3 years. Median interval from AHCT1 to relapse/progression was 18 months, and median interval between transplantations was 32 months. After AHCT2, the incidence of relapse/progression at 1 and 3 years was 51% and 82%, respectively. At 3 years after AHCT2, progression-free survival was 13%, and overall survival was 46%. In multivariate analyses, those relapsing ?36 months after AHCT1 had superior progression-free (P = .045) and overall survival (P = .019). Patients who underwent AHCT2 after 2004 had superior survival (P = .026). AHCT2 is safe and feasible for disease progression after AHCT1. In this retrospective study, individuals relapsing ?36 months from AHCT1 derived greater benefit from AHCT2 compared with those with a shorter disease-free interval. Storage of an adequate graft before AHCT1 will ensure that the option of a second autologous transplantation is retained for patients with relapsed/progressive MM.
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Outcome of lower-intensity allogeneic transplantation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma after autologous transplantation failure.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2011
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We studied the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning regimens (reduced-intensity conditioning and nonmyeloablative) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma who relapsed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Nonrelapse mortality, lymphoma progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival were analyzed in 263 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. All 263 patients had relapsed after a previous autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and then had undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a related (n = 26) or unrelated (n = 237) donor after reduced-intensity conditioning (n = 128) or nonmyeloablative (n = 135) and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2006. The median follow-up of survivors was 68 months (range, 3-111 months). Three-year nonrelapse mortality was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37%-50%). Lymphoma progression/relapse at 3 years was 35% (95% CI, 29%-41%). Three-year probabilities of PFS and overall survival were 21% (95% CI, 16%-27%) and 32% (95% CI, 27%-38%), respectively. Superior Karnofsky Performance Score, longer interval between transplantations, total body irradiation-based conditioning regimen, and lymphoma remission at transplantation were correlated with improved PFS. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning is associated with significant nonrelapse mortality but can result in long-term PFS. We describe a quantitative risk model based on pretransplantation risk factors to identify those patients likely to benefit from this approach.
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Human microvascular dysfunction and apoptotic injury induced by AL amyloidosis light chain proteins.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2011
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Light chain amyloidosis (AL) involves overproduction of amyloidogenic light chain proteins (LC) leading to heart failure, yet the mechanisms underlying tissue toxicity remain unknown. We hypothesized that LC induces endothelial dysfunction in non-AL human microvasculature and apoptotic injury in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Adipose arterioles (n = 34, 50 ± 3 yr) and atrial coronary arterioles (n = 19, 68 ± 2 yr) from non-AL subjects were cannulated. Adipose arteriole dilator responses to acetylcholine/papaverine were measured at baseline and 1 h exposure to LC (20 ?g/ml) from biopsy-proven AL subjects (57 ± 11 yr) without and with antioxidant cotreatment. Coronary arteriole dilation to bradykinin/papaverine was measured post-LC exposure. HCAECs were exposed to 1 or 24 h of LC. LC reduced dilation to acetylcholine (10(-4) M: 41.6 ± 7 vs. 85.8 ± 2.2% control, P < 0.001) and papaverine (81.4 ± 4.6 vs. 94.8 ± 1.3% control, P < 0.01) in adipose arterioles and to bradykinin (10(-6) M: 68.6 ± 6.2 vs. 90.9 ± 1.6% control, P < 0.001) but not papaverine in coronary arterioles. There was an increase in superoxide and peroxynitrite in arterioles treated with LC. Adipose arteriole dilation was restored by cotreatment with polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase and tetrahydrobiopterin but only partially restored by mitoquinone (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) and gp91ds-tat (NADPH oxidase inhibitor). HCAECs exposed to LC showed reduced NO and increased superoxide, peroxynitrite, annexin-V, and propidium iodide compared with control. Brief exposure to physiological amounts of LC induced endothelial dysfunction in human adipose and coronary arterioles and increased apoptotic injury in coronary artery endothelial cells likely as a result of oxidative stress, reduced NO bioavailability, and peroxynitrite production. Microvascular dysfunction and injury is a novel mechanism underlying AL pathobiology and is a potential target for therapy.
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Autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation followed by allogeneic or autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma (BMT CTN 0102): a phase 3 biological assignment trial.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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Autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma, but disease progression remains an issue. Allogeneic HSCT might reduce disease progression, but can be associated with high treatment-related mortality. Thus, we aimed to assess effectiveness of allogeneic HSCT with non-myeloablative conditioning after autologous HSCT compared with tandem autologous HSCT.
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Characteristics of CliniMACS® System CD34-enriched T cell-depleted grafts in a multicenter trial for acute myeloid leukemia-Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) protocol 0303.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
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Eight centers participated in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) protocol 0303 to determine the effect of extensive T cell depletion (TCD) on the outcome of HLA matched sibling donor transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. One goal of the study was to determine if TCD could be performed uniformly among study sites. TCD was achieved using the CliniMACS(®) CD34 Reagent System for CD34 enrichment. Processed grafts needed to contain ? 2.0 × 10(6) CD34(+)cells/kg with a target of 5.0 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg and <10(5) CD3(+) T cells/kg. Up to 3 collections were allowed to achieve the minimum CD34(+) cell dose. In total, 86 products were processed for 44 patients. Differences in the starting cell products between centers were seen in regard to total nucleated cells, CD34(+) cells, and CD3(+) T cells, which could in part be ascribed to a higher dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor used for mobilization early in the trial. Differences between centers in processing outcomes were minimal and could be ascribed to starting cell parameters or to differences in graft analysis methods. Multivariate analysis showed that CD34(+) cell recovery (66.1% ± 20.3%) was inversely associated with the starting number of CD34(+) cells (P = .02). Median purity of the CD34 enriched fraction was 96.7% (61.5%-99.8%) with monocytes and B cells the most common impurity. All patients received the minimum CD34(+) cell dose, and 39 patients (89%) came within 10% or exceeded the target CD34(+) cell dose without exceeding the maximum T cell dose. All patients proceeded to transplantation and all achieved initial engraftment. Products processed at multiple centers using the CliniMACS System for CD34 enrichment were comparably and uniformly highly enriched for CD34(+) cells, with good CD34(+) cell recovery and very low CD3(+) T cell content.
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Alternate donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in non-Hodgkin lymphoma using lower intensity conditioning: a report from the CIBMTR.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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We analyzed the outcomes of 248 (61% male) adult recipients of HLA-matched unrelated and HLA-mismatched related donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) after reduced or lower intensity conditioning (RIC), reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1997 to 2004. Median age was 52 (range: 18-72 years); 31% had a Karnofsky performance score <90. Follicular NHL (43%) was the major histology. Incidence of grades II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was 43% at 100 days; and chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was 44% at 3 years. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) at 100 days was 24%. Three-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 41% and 32%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, use of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and HLA mismatch were associated with increased TRM. High-grade histology, ATG use, and chemotherapy resistance were associated with lower PFS. Older age, shorter interval from diagnosis to HCT, non-total body irridiation (TBI) conditioning regimens, ex vivo T cell depletion, and HLA-mismatched unrelated donors were associated with mortality. GVHD did not influence relapse or PFS. Older age, aggressive histology, and chemotherapy resistance correlated with poorer survival. For selected patients with NHL, lack of an available sibling donor should not be a barrier to allogeneic HCT.
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Trends in allogeneic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma: a CIBMTR analysis.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2011
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in multiple myeloma is limited by prior reports of high treatment-related mortality. We analyzed outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma in 1207 recipients in 3 cohorts based on the year of transplantation: 1989-1994 (n = 343), 1995-2000 (n = 376), and 2001-2005 (n = 488). The most recent cohort was significantly older (53% > 50 years) and had more recipients after prior autotransplantation. Use of unrelated donors, reduced-intensity conditioning and the blood cell grafts increased over time. Rates of acute graft-versus-host (GVHD) were similar, but chronic GVHD rates were highest in the most recent cohort. Overall survival (OS) at 1-year increased over time, reflecting a decrease in treatment-related mortality, but 5-year relapse rates increased from 39% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33%-44%) in 1989-1994 to 58% (95% CI, 51%-64%; P < .001) in the 2001-2005 cohort. Projected 5-year progression-free survival and OS are 14% (95% CI, 9%-20%) and 29% (95% CI, 23%-35%), respectively, in the latest cohort. Increasing age, longer interval from diagnosis to transplantation, and unrelated donor grafts adversely affected OS in multivariate analysis. Survival at 5 years for subjects with none, 1, 2, or 3 of these risk factors were 41% (range, 36%-47%), 32% (range, 27%-37%), 25% (range, 19%-31%), and 3% (range, 0%-11%), respectively (P < .0001).
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Tocilizumab for the treatment of steroid refractory graft-versus-host disease.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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Corticosteroid refractory graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is one of the major challenges in the management of allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. Although numerous agents have been employed to treat this patient population, no standardized second-line therapy exists. In this study, we report our experience with the administration of tocilizumab, an anti-interleukin 6 receptor antibody, in the treatment of steroid refractory GVHD. Tocilizumab was administered to 8 patients with refractory acute (n = 6) or chronic GVHD (cGVHD) (n = 2) once every 3 to 4 weeks. The majority of patients with acute GVHD (aGVHD) had grade IV organ involvement of the skin or gastrointestinal tract, whereas both patients with cGVHD had long-standing severe skin sclerosis at the time of treatment. There were no allergic or infusion-related adverse events. Treatment was discontinued in one patient over concerns that tocilizumab may have worsened preexisting hyperbilirubinemia. Several patients also had transient elevations in serum transaminase values. Infections were the primary adverse events associated with tocilizumab administration. Four patients (67%) with aGVHD had either partial or complete responses apparent within the first 56 days of therapy. One patient with cGVHD had a significant response to therapy, whereas the second had stabilization of disease that allowed for a modest reduction in immune suppressive medications. These results indicate that tocilizumab has activity in the treatment of steroid refractory GVHD and warrants further investigation as a therapeutic option for this disorder.
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Detection of amyloid in abdominal fat pad aspirates in early amyloidosis: Role of electron microscopy and Congo red stained cell block sections.
Cytojournal
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) of the abdominal fat pad is a minimally invasive procedure to demonstrate tissue deposits of amyloid. However, protocols to evaluate amyloid in fat pad aspirates are not standardized, especially for detecting scant amyloid in early disease.
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Percussion hemoglobinuria - a novel term for hand trauma-induced mechanical hemolysis: a case report.
J Med Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
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Extracorpuscular hemolysis caused by mechanical trauma has been well described in relation to lower extremity use, such as in soldiers and runners. Terms such as "march hemoglobinuria", "foot strike hemolysis" and "runners hemoglobinuria" have previously been coined and are easily recalled. Newer cases, however, are being identified in individuals vigorously using their upper extremities, such as drum players who use their hands to strike the instrument. Given the increased recognition of upper extremity-related mechanical hemolysis and hemoglobinuria in drummers, and the use of hand drumming worldwide, we would like introduce a novel term for this condition and call it "percussion hemoglobinuria".
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Effect of obesity on outcomes after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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Obesity has implications for chemotherapy dosing and selection of patients for therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AutoHCT) improves outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma, but optimal chemotherapy dosing for obese patients is poorly defined. We analyzed the outcomes of 1087 recipients of AutoHCT for myeloma reported to the CIBMTR between 1995 and 2003 who received high-dose melphalan conditioning, with or without total body irradiation (TBI). We categorized patients by body mass index (BMI) as normal, overweight, obese, or severely obese. There was no overall effect of BMI on progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), progression, or nonrelapse mortality (NRM). In patients receiving melphalan and TBI conditioning, obese and severely obese patients had superior PFS and OS compared with normal and overweight patients, but the clinical significance of this finding is unclear. More obese patients were more likely to receive a reduced dose of melphalan, but there was no evidence that melphalan or TBI dosing variability affected PFS. Therefore, current common strategies of dosing melphalan do not impair outcomes for obese patients, and obesity should not exclude patients from consideration of autologous transplantation. Further research is necessary to optimize dosing of both chemotherapy and radiation in obese patients.
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Low risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease and relapse associated with T cell-depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission: results of the blood and marrow transplant clinical trials network prot
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2011
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Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is most effectively prevented by ex vivo T cell depletion (TCD) of the allograft, but its role in the treatment of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) remains unclear. We performed a phase 2 single-arm multicenter study to evaluate the role of TCD in AML patients in CR1 or CR2 up to age 65 years. The primary objective was to achieve a disease-free survival (DFS) rate of >75% at 6 months posttransplantation. A total of 44 patients with AML in CR1 (n = 37) or CR2 (n = 7) with a median age of 48.5 years (range, 21-59 years) received myeloablative chemotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (1375 cGy) followed by immunomagnetically selected CD34-enriched, T cell?depleted allografts from HLA-identical siblings. No pharmacologic GVHD prophylaxis was given. All patients engrafted. The incidence of acute GVHD grade II-IV was 22.7%, and the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was 6.8% at 24 months. The relapse rate for patients in CR1 was 17.4% at 36 months. With a median follow-up of 34 months, DFS for all patients was 82% at 6 months, and DFS for patients in CR1 was 72.8% at 12 months and 58% at 36 months. HCT after myeloablative chemoradiotherapy can be performed in a multicenter setting using a uniform method of TCD, resulting in a low risk of extensive chronic GVHD and relapse for patients with AML in CR1.
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Outcome of patients with IgD and IgM multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective CIBMTR study.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2010
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Immunoglobulin D (IgD) and IgM multiple myeloma represent uncommon immunoglobulin isotypes, accounting for 2% and 0.5% of cases, respectively. Limited information is available regarding the prognosis of these isotypes, but they have been considered to have a more aggressive course than the more common immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA isotypes. In particular, the outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) has not been well defined.
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Performing and processing FNA of anterior fat pad for amyloid.
J Vis Exp
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2010
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Historically, heart, liver, and kidney biopsies were performed to demonstrate amyloid deposits in amyloidosis. Since the clinical presentation of this disease is so variable and non-specific, the associated risks of these biopsies are too great for the diagnostic yield. Other sites that have a lower biopsy risk, such as skin or gingival, are also relatively invasive and expensive. In addition, these biopsies may not always have sufficient amyloid deposits to establish a diagnosis. Fat pad aspiration has demonstrated good clinical correlation with low cost and minimal morbidity. However, there are no standardized protocols for performing this procedure or processing the aspirated specimen, which leads to variable and nonreproducible results. The most frequently utilized modality for detecting amyloid in tissue is an apple-green birefringence on Congo red stained sections using a polarizing microscope. This technique requires cell block preparation of aspirated material. Unfortunately, patients presenting in early stage of amyloidosis have minimal amounts of amyloid which greatly reduces the sensitivity of Congo red stained cell block sections of fat pad aspirates. Therefore, ultrastructural evaluation of fat pad aspirates by electron microscopy should be utilized, given its increased sensitivity for amyloid detection. This article demonstrates a simple and reproducible procedure for performing anterior fat pad aspiration for the detection of amyloid utilizing both Congo red staining of cell block sections and electron microscopy for ultrastructural identification.
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Access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: effect of race and sex.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
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The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) to treat leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma (MM) differs by race and sex.
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Utility of CD56 immunohistochemical studies in follow-up of plasma cell myeloma.
Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 10-30-2009
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Although 70% to 80% of plasma cell myelomas (PCMs) express CD56, few data are available on the usefulness of CD56 immunohistochemical analysis in assessing residual disease. We retrospectively reviewed 127 PCM posttreatment bone marrow (BM) specimens, classifying them as positive or negative for residual disease (independent of CD56 immunohistochemical studies) based on abnormal plasma cell (PC) morphologic features or flow cytometry (FC) and/or light chain restriction by immunohistochemical studies (conventional criteria). CD56 immunohistochemical analysis was performed on these and 20 negative lymphoma staging BM specimens. Of 127 BM specimens, 74 were positive and 53 were negative for residual PCM by conventional criteria. Of 74 BM specimens positive by conventional criteria, 59 (80%) demonstrated CD56 (strong+) PCs in clusters and/or with cytologic atypia. Of the 53 BM specimens negative by conventional criteria, 3 showed CD56 (strong+) morphologically atypical PCs in clusters or scattered. CD56 immunohistochemical analysis is useful for detecting residual PCM, particularly in morphologically equivocal cases in which light chain restriction cannot be demonstrated, and may serve as a potential response criterion.
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Race and outcomes of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2009
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Blacks are twice as likely to develop and die from multiple myeloma (MM), and are less likely to receive an autologous hematopoietic-cell transplant (AHCT) for MM compared to Whites. The influence of race on outcomes of AHCT for MM is not well described. We compared the probability of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), disease progression, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) among Black (N=303) and White (N=1892) recipients of AHCT for MM, who were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2005. The Black cohort was more likely to be female, and had better Karnofsky performance scores, but lower hemoglobin and albumin levels at diagnosis. Black recipients were younger and more likely to be transplanted later in their disease course. Disease stage and treatment characteristics prior to AHCT were similar between the 2 groups. Black and White recipients had similar probabilities of 5-year OS (52% versus 47%, P=.19) and PFS (19% versus 21%, P=.64) as well as cumulative incidences of disease progression (72% versus 72%, P=.97) and NRM (9% versus 8%, P=.52). In multivariate analyses, race was not associated with any of these endpoints. Black recipients of AHCT for MM have similar outcomes compared to Whites, suggesting that the reasons underlying lower rates of AHCT in Blacks need to be studied further to ensure equal access to effective therapy.
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A comparison of HLA-identical sibling allogeneic versus autologous transplantation for diffuse large B cell lymphoma: a report from the CIBMTR.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2009
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We compared outcomes of 916 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients aged >or=18 years undergoing first autologous (n = 837) or myeloablative (MA) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) (n = 79) between 1995 and 2003 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Median follow-up was 81 months for allogeneic HCT versus 60 months for autologous HCT. Allogeneic HCT recipients were more likely to have high-risk disease features including higher stage, more prior chemotherapy regimens, and resistant disease. Allogeneic HCT was associated with a higher 1 year treatment-related mortality (TRM) (relative risk [RR] 4.88, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.21-7.40, P < .001), treatment failure (RR 2.06, 95% CI, 1.54-2.75, P < .001), and mortality (RR 2.75, 95% CI, 2.03-3.72, P < .001). Risk of disease progression was similar in the 2 groups (RR 1.12, 95% CI, 0.73-1.72, P = .59). In fact, for 1-year survivors, no significant differences were observed for TRM, progression, progression-free (PFS) or overall survival (OS). Increased risks of TRM and mortality were associated with older age (>50 years), lower performance score, chemoresistance, and earlier year of transplant. In a cohort of mainly high-risk DLBCL patients, upfront MA allogeneic HCT, although associated with increased early mortality, was associated with a similar risk of disease progression compared to lower risk patients receiving autologous HCT.
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Impact of pre-transplant rituximab on survival after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for diffuse large B cell lymphoma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2009
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Incorporation of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab into front-line regimens to treat diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has resulted in improved survival. Despite this progress, however, many patients develop refractory or recurrent DLBCL and then undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AuHCT). It is unclear to what extent pre-transplant exposure to rituximab affects outcomes after AuHCT. Outcomes of 994 patients receiving AuHCT for DLBCL between 1996 and 2003 were analyzed according to whether rituximab was (n = 176; +R cohort) or was not (n = 818; -R cohort) administered with front-line or salvage therapy before AuHCT. The +R cohort had superior progression-free survival (PFS; 50% vs 38%; P = .008) and overall survival (OS; 57% vs 45%; P = .006) at 3 years. Platelet and neutrophil engraftment were not affected by exposure to rituximab. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. In multivariate analysis, the +R cohort had improved PFS (relative risk of relapse/progression or death, 0.64; P < .001) and improved OS (relative risk of death, 0.74; P = .039). We conclude that pre-transplant rituximab is associated with a lower rate of progression and improved survival after AuHCT for DLBCL, with no evidence of impaired engraftment or increased NRM.
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Long-term outcome of patients with multiple myeloma after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation and nonmyeloablative allografting.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2009
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Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) followed by nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT (auto/alloHCT) provides cytoreduction and graft-versus-myeloma effects. We report on long-term outcomes of 102 patients with multiple myeloma who received auto/alloHCT with a median follow-up of 6.3 years. Treatment consisted of high-dose melphalan and autograft followed by 2-Gy total body irradiation, with or without fludarabine, and alloHCT from human leukocyte antigen-identical siblings. Postgrafting immunosuppressive agent was cyclosporine or tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Forty-two percent of patients developed grade 2 to 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and 74% extensive chronic GVHD. Five-year nonrelapse mortality after allografting was 18%, 95% related to GVHD or infections. Among 95 patients with detectable disease, 59 achieved complete remissions. Median time to progression was 5 years. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3 years. Five-year OS and PFS were 64% and 36%, respectively. Seventy-three patients receiving autoHCT within 10 months from treatment initiation had 5-year OS of 69% and PFS of 37%. In multivariate analysis, beta-2-microglobulin of more than 3.5 microg/mL at diagnosis and auto/alloHCT more than 10 months after treatment initiation correlated with shorter OS (P = .03 and P = .02) and PFS (P = .04 and P = .03), whereas Karnofsky scores less than 90% at allotransplantation correlated with shorter PFS only (P = .005). Long-term disease control and GVHD remain key issues.
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Prognostic implication of late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac MRI in light chain (AL) amyloidosis on long term follow up.
BMC Med Phys
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2009
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Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a rare plasma cell dyscrasia associated with poor survival especially in the setting of heart failure. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiac MRI was recently found to correlate with myocardial amyloid deposition but the prognostic role is not established. The aim is to determine the prognostic significance of LGE in AL by comparing long term survival of AL patients with and without LGE.
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Systemic and microvascular oxidative stress induced by light chain amyloidosis.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2009
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Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a plasma cell dyscrasia associated with production of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chains (LC). Despite its often fatal course, the mechanism of injury remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that AL is associated with oxidative stress by comparing serum protein carbonyl (a marker of protein oxidation and oxidative stress) in AL subjects (n=23, 60 ± 11 years) vs. controls (n=9, 54 ± 2 years); we also measured superoxide production (n=11) and dilator response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, n=6) in isolated non-AL human adipose arterioles exposed to LC (20 ?g/mL) purified from AL subjects for 1 h vs. control. Protein carbonyl was higher in AL patients (0.19 ± 0.04 vs. 0.003 ± 0.003 nmol/mg control, p=0.002). Post-exposure to LC proteins, arteriole superoxide was higher (1.89 ± 0.36 times control, p=0.03) with impaired dilation to SNP (10(-4) M, 54 ± 6 vs. 86 ± 4%, p=0.01, logEC50 -3.7 ± 0.2 vs. -6.7 ± 0.6, p=0.002). AL is associated with systemic oxidative stress and brief acute exposure to AL light chain proteins induces oxidative stress and microvascular dysfunction in human adipose arterioles. This novel mechanism of injury may be important in AL pathophysiology.
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Left ventricular ejection time on echocardiography predicts long-term mortality in light chain amyloidosis.
J Am Soc Echocardiogr
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is associated with high mortality. The aim was to identify echocardiographic parameters that predict AL long-term mortality.
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Unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for non-hodgkin lymphoma: long-term outcomes.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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We analyzed the outcomes of 283 patients receiving unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) facilitated by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research/National Marrow Donor Program (CIBMTR/NMDP) between 1991 and 2004. All patients received myeloablative conditioning regimens. The median follow-up of survivors is 5 years. Seventy-three (26%) patients are alive. The day 100 probability of death from all causes is estimated at 39%. The cumulative incidence of developing grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) at day 100 is 25%. The estimated 5-year survival and failure free survival are 24% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 19-30) and 22% (95% CI: 17-28), respectively. Factors adversely associated with overall survival (OS) included increasing age, decreased performance status, and refractory disease. Follicular lymphoma (FL) and peripheral T cell lymphoma had improved survival compared to aggressive B cell lymphomas. Factors adversely associated with progression-free survival (PFS) included performance status, histology, and disease status at transplant. Long-term failure-free survival is possible following unrelated donor transplantation for NHL, although early mortality was high in this large cohort.
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Unrelated donor reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2009
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Myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) may cure patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), but is associated with a high treatment-related mortality (TRM). Reduced-intensity and nonmyeloablative (RIC/NST) conditioning regimens aim to lower TRM. We analyzed the outcomes of 143 patients undergoing unrelated donor RIC/NST HCT for relapsed and refractory HL between 1999 and 2004 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Patients were heavily pretreated, including autologous HCT in 89%. With a median follow-up of 25 months, the probability of TRM at day 100 and 2 years was 15% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10%-21%) and 33% (95% CI 25%-41%), respectively. The probabilities of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 30% and 56% at 1 year and 20% and 37% at 2 years. The presence of extranodal disease and the Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) <90 were significant risk factors for TRM, PFS, and OS, whereas chemosensitivity at transplantation was not. Dose intensity of the conditioning regimen (RIC versus NST) did not impact outcomes. Unrelated donor HCT with RIC/NST can salvage some patients with relapsed/refractory HL, but relapse remains a common reason for treatment failure. Clinical studies should be aimed at reducing the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and relapse.
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Phenotyping studies of clonotypic B lymphocytes from patients with multiple myeloma by flow cytometry.
Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2009
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Clonotypic B lymphocytes, monoclonal B lymphocytes sharing identical, rearranged IGH-CDR3 sequences with the patients myeloma cells, have been detected in the peripheral blood of patients with multiple myeloma. These cells have been postulated to act as a therapy-resistant tumor reservoir that drives recurrence.
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Autologous and allogeneic transplantation for burkitt lymphoma outcomes and changes in utilization: a report from the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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Trends in utilization and outcomes after autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Burkitt lymphoma were analyzed in 241 recipients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1985 and 2007. The autologous HCT cohort had a higher proportion of chemotherapy-sensitive disease, peripheral blood grafts, and HCT in first complete remission (CR1). The use of autologous HCT has declined over time, with only 19% done after 2001. Overall survival at 5 years for the autologous cohort was 83% for those in CR1 and 31% for those not in CR1. Corresponding progression-free survival (PFS) was 78% and 27%, respectively. After allogeneic HCT, overall survival at 5 years was 53% and 20% for the CR1 and non-CR1 cohorts, whereas PFS was 50% and 19%, respectively. The most common cause of death was progressive lymphoma. Allogeneic HCT performed in a higher-risk subset (per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines) resulted in a 5-year PFS of 27%. Autologous HCT resulted in a 5-year PFS of 44% in those undergoing transplantation in the second CR.
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Conditioning regimens for allotransplants for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: myeloablative or reduced intensity?
Blood
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The best conditioning regimen before allogeneic transplantation for high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains to be clarified. We analyzed data from 396 recipients of allotransplants for DLBCL receiving myeloablative (MAC; n = 165), reduced intensity (RIC; n = 143), or nonmyeloablative conditioning (NMAC; n = 88) regimens. Acute and chronic GVHD rates were similar across the groups. Five-year nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was higher in MAC than RIC and NMAC (56% vs 47% vs 36%; P = .007). Five-year relapse/progression was lower in MAC than in RIC/NMAC (26% vs 38% vs 40%; P = .031). Five-year progression-free survival (15%-25%) and overall survival (18%-26%) did not differ significantly between the cohorts. In multivariate analysis, NMAC and more recent transplant year were associated with lower NRM, whereas a lower Karnofsky performance score (< 90), prior relapse resistant to therapy, and use of unrelated donors were associated with higher NRM. NMAC transplants, no prior use of rituximab, and prior relapse resistant to therapy were associated with a greater risk of relapse/progression. In conclusion, allotransplantation with RIC or NMAC induces long-term progression-free survival in selected DLBCL patients with a lower risk of NRM but with higher risk of lymphoma progression or relapse.
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Protective role of clusterin in preserving endothelial function in AL amyloidosis.
Atherosclerosis
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Misfolded immunoglobulin light chain proteins (LC) in light chain amyloidosis (AL) are toxic to vascular tissues. We tested the hypothesis that chaperone protein clusterin preserves endothelial function and cell survival during LC exposure.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for myelofibrosis in the era of JAK inhibitors.
Blood
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The discovery of JAK2617F mutation paved the way for the development of small molecule inhibitors of JAK1/2 resulting in first approved JAK1/2 inhibitor, ruxolitinib, for the treatment of patients with myelofibrosis (MF). Although JAK1/2 inhibitor therapy is effective in decreasing the burden of symptoms associated with splenomegaly and MF-related constitutional symptoms, it is neither curative nor effective in reducing the risk of leukemic transformation. Presently, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative therapy for MF. A significant risk of regimen-related toxicities, graft failure, and GVHD are major barriers to the success of HCT in MF. Because of significant HCT-associated morbidity and mortality, divergent opinions regarding its appropriate role in this clinical situation have emerged. In this review, the risk-benefit ratios of modern drug therapy compared with HCT in MF patients are analyzed. A risk-adapted approach individualized to each patients biologic characteristics and comorbidities is described, which is currently warranted in determining optimal treatment strategies for patients with MF. Inclusion of JAK1/2 inhibitor therapy in future transplant conditioning regimens may provide an opportunity to overcome some of these barriers, resulting in greater success with HCT for MF patients.
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Randomized, multicenter, phase 2 study (EVOLUTION) of combinations of bortezomib, dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, and lenalidomide in previously untreated multiple myeloma.
Blood
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Combinations of bortezomib (V) and dexamethasone (D) with either lenalidomide (R) or cyclophosphamide (C) have shown significant efficacy. This randomized phase 2 trial evaluated VDC, VDR, and VDCR in previously untreated multiple myeloma (MM). Patients received V 1.3 mg/m2 (days 1, 4, 8, 11) and D 40 mg (days 1, 8, 15), with either C 500 mg/m2 (days 1, 8) and R 15 mg (days 1-14; VDCR), R 25 mg (days 1-14; VDR), C 500 mg/m2 (days 1, 8; VDC) or C 500 mg/m2 (days 1, 8, 15; VDC-mod) in 3-week cycles (maximum 8 cycles), followed by maintenance with V 1.3 mg/m2 (days 1, 8, 15, 22) for four 6-week cycles (all arms)?very good partial response was seen in 58%, 51%, 41%, and 53% (complete response rate of 25%, 24%, 22%, and 47%) of patients (VDCR, VDR, VCD, and VCD-mod, respectively); the corresponding 1-year progression-free survival was 86%, 83%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. Common adverse events included hematologic toxicities, peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, and gastrointestinal disturbances. All regimens were highly active and well tolerated in previously untreated MM, and, based on this trial, VDR and VCD-mod are preferred for clinical practice and further comparative testing. No substantial advantage was noted with VDCR over the 3-drug combinations. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00507442).
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Immunophenotypic stability of Sézary cells by flow cytometry: usefulness of flow cytometry in assessing response to and guiding alemtuzumab therapy.
Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
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Flow cytometry (FC) is frequently used to detect aberrant peripheral blood (PB) T cells ("Sézary cells") in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS). However, immunophenotypic stability of MF/SS over time is not well characterized. We analyzed 141 PB samples from 9 cases (2 SS, 7 MF). At diagnosis, there were 3 to 5 immunophenotypic aberrancies per case (median, 4), including dim or absent CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, or CD26 and bright CD45RO. Of 9 patients, 7 had a subsequent change in immunophenotype. All patients retained multiple aberrancies at follow-up (median, 3 per analysis; range, 2-6), of which 22.0% (81/369) were new. In 5 patients, a more than 99% decrease in absolute Sézary cell (ASC) counts by FC after alemtuzumab therapy or total skin electron beam radiation was associated with clinical improvement. We observed minor immunophenotypic changes over time in most patients with MF/SS; however, the Sézary clones maintain persistently aberrant immunophenotypes and seem amenable to follow-up with limited FC panels. ASC counts by FC correlated well with clinical response.
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