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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Analysis of Retrieved Growth Guidance Sliding LSZ-4D Devices for early onset Scoliosis and Investigation of the use of Nitinol rods for this System.
Spine
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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Study Design. Analysis of volumetric wear loss of retrieved growth guidance sliding devices LSZ-4D for treatment of early onset scoliosis and laboratory in-vitro wear test for comparison of Nitinol, Ti and CoCr alloys wear resistance.Objective. To evaluate quantitatively the amount of wear debris from the sliding LSZ-4D device and to investigate the potential of using Nitinol for replacing Ti alloys in spinal instrumentation. In order to do that, wear resistance of Nitinol, Ti and CoCr was compared.Summary of Background Data. There is little data regarding the amount of wear debris associated with growth guidance sliding devices for patients with early onset scoliosis and the wear resistance of superelastic Nitinol compared with Ti and CoCr.Methods. Volumetric wear loss was measured on LSZ-4D devices made from titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and each consisted of 2 rectangular section (6×4 mm) rods and 40±8 fixture elements (20±4 hooks and 20±4 clips) retrieved from 3 patients (implantation period 3.5-5.8 years). Images of wear scars were taken on Bruker interferometer microscope and incorporated into MATLAB software. Wear resistance of Nitinol, Ti and CoCr was studied using reciprocation pin-on-disk wear test in bovine serum at 37±1°C.Results. The volume wear rate of LSZ-4D device was found to be 12.5 mm per year from which 5mm per year is the rods wear debris and 7.5 mm per year is the contribution of fixtures. Wear resistance of Nitinol is 100 times higher compared to Ti and comparable to that of CoCr.Conclusions. Application of wear resistant coatings on Ti components in growth guidance sliding devices for the treatment of early onset scoliosis will be useful. High wear resistance of Nitinol combined with its superelastic and shape memory properties could make application of Nitinol rods for spinal instrumentation beneficial.
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Retroperitoneal fibrosis.
Vasc Med
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2014
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Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) is a rare disease that is marked by systemic inflammation and the development of a periaortic fibroinflammatory mass. The fibroinflammatory infiltration can encase the abdominal aorta, ureters, and other abdominal organs. The clinical presentation often includes constitutional symptoms, abdominal pain, and signs of renal insufficiency or renal failure related to ureteral obstruction. Less frequently, RPF may present with vascular complications, such as venous thrombosis or claudication. The idiopathic form of RPF is most common but secondary forms have been described and are associated with malignancy and a variety of different medications. The pathophysiology is uncertain, but RPF has been linked with periaortitis and IgG4-related disease. Treatment centers on the relief of symptoms and complications associated with mass effects. Corticosteroids and other immunosuppressant therapies can improve constitutional symptoms, reduce infiltrate mass, and achieve disease remission, but a chronic relapsing course is not uncommon.
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Human cytomegalovirus gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A complex elicits potently neutralizing antibodies in mice.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
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Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the ?-herpesvirus family that causes significant disease worldwide. Although evidence exists that neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T cell responses to HCMV antigens can prevent HCMV disease and/or infection, there are no approved vaccines to prevent HCMV disease. Over the past 10 years, multiple HCMV vaccines have been tested in man but only partial protection has been achieved in these studies. HCMV contains multiple surface-expressed glycoproteins that are critical to viral entry, including gB, the gM/gN complex, the gH/gL complex, and a pentameric gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A complex. Recently we showed that viral replicon particles (VRPs) expressing the gH/gL complex elicited more potently neutralizing antibodies than VRPs expressing gB in mice. Here we compare the immunogenicity of VRPs encoding the HCMV gH/gL and pentameric complexes, as well as purified gH/gL and pentameric complexes administered in the presence or absence of the MF59 adjuvant. The results of these studies indicate that the pentameric complex elicits significantly higher levels of neutralizing antibodies than the gH/gL complex, and that MF59 significantly increases the potency of each complex. In addition, we show that animals immunized with pentamer encoding VRPs or the pentameric subunit produce antibodies that recognize a broad range of antigenic sites on the complex. Taken together, these studies support the utility of the pentameric complex in HCMV vaccine candidates.
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A Cationic Nanoemulsion for the Delivery of Next-generation RNA Vaccines.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2014
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Nucleic acid-based vaccines such as viral vectors, plasmid DNA, and mRNA are being developed as a means to address a number of unmet medical needs that current vaccine technologies have been unable to address. Here, we describe a cationic nanoemulsion (CNE) delivery system developed to deliver a self-amplifying mRNA vaccine. This nonviral delivery system is based on Novartis's proprietary adjuvant MF59, which has an established clinical safety profile and is well tolerated in children, adults, and the elderly. We show that nonviral delivery of a 9?kb self-amplifying mRNA elicits potent immune responses in mice, rats, rabbits, and nonhuman primates comparable to a viral delivery technology, and demonstrate that, relatively low doses (75 µg) induce antibody and T-cell responses in primates. We also show the CNE-delivered self-amplifying mRNA enhances the local immune environment through recruitment of immune cells similar to an MF59 adjuvanted subunit vaccine. Lastly, we show that the site of protein expression within the muscle and magnitude of protein expression is similar to a viral vector. Given the demonstration that self-amplifying mRNA delivered using a CNE is well tolerated and immunogenic in a variety of animal models, we are optimistic about the prospects for this technology.Molecular Therapy (2014); doi:10.1038/mt.2014.133.
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Prevalence of Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis among Archived Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis Isolates in Zimbabwe.
Tuberc Res Treat
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2014
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We conducted a cross-sectional study of second line drug resistance patterns and genetic diversity of MDR-TB isolates archived at the BRTI-TB Laboratory, Harare, between January 2007 and December 2011. DSTs were performed for second line antituberculosis drugs. XDR-TB strains were defined as MDR-TB strains with resistance to either kanamycin and ofloxacin or capreomycin and ofloxacin. Strain types were identified by spoligotyping. No resistance to any second line drugs was shown in 73% of the isolates, with 23% resistant to one or two drugs but not meeting the definition of XDR-TB. A total of 26 shared types were identified, and 18 (69%) matched preexisting shared types in the current published spoligotype databases. Of the 11 out of 18 clustered SITs, 4 predominant (>6 isolates per shared type) were identified. The most and least abundant types were SIT 1468 (LAM 11-ZWE) with 12 (18%) isolates and SIT 53 (T1) with 6 (9%) isolates, respectively. XDR-TB strains are rare in Zimbabwe, but the high proportion of "pre-XDR-TB" strains and treatment failure cases is of concern. The genetic diversity of the MDR-TB strains showed no significant association between SITs and drug resistance.
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Subcapsular sinus macrophages limit dissemination of West Nile virus particles after inoculation but are not essential for the development of West Nile virus-specific T cell responses.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2014
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Macrophages encounter flaviviruses early after injection by arthropod vectors. Using in vivo imaging of mice inoculated with firefly luciferase-expressing single-cycle flavivirus particles (FLUC-SCFV), we examined the initial dissemination of virus particles in the presence or absence of lymph node (LN)-resident macrophages. Higher luciferase activity, indicating higher SCFV gene expression, was detected in the footpad of macrophage-depleted mice after 24h post infection (hpi). Moreover, FLUC-SCFV particles disseminated to the spleen within 14 hpi in macrophage-depleted, but not control mice. Although macrophages presented SCFV to naïve T cells in vitro, depletion of subcapsular sinus (SCS) macrophages did not alter the magnitude or effector function of the WNV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. Together, these results indicate that SCS macrophages play a role in limiting the dissemination of SCFV early in infection but are not required for the generation of a polyfunctional WNV-specific CD8(+) T cell response in the draining LN.
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Drug-resistant tuberculosis in high-risk groups, Zimbabwe.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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To estimate prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 2012, we performed microbiologic testing on acid-fast bacilli smear-positive sputum samples from patients previously treated for TB. Twenty (24%) of 84 specimens were consistent with MDR TB. A national drug-resistance survey is needed to determine MDR TB prevalence in Zimbabwe.
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Feasibility, accuracy, and clinical effect of point-of-care Xpert MTB/RIF testing for tuberculosis in primary-care settings in Africa: a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2013
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The Xpert MTB/RIF test for tuberculosis is being rolled out in many countries, but evidence is lacking regarding its implementation outside laboratories, ability to inform same-day treatment decisions at the point of care, and clinical effect on tuberculosis-related morbidity. We aimed to assess the feasibility, accuracy, and clinical effect of point-of-care Xpert MTB/RIF testing at primary-care health-care facilities in southern Africa.
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TLR3- and MyD88-dependent signaling differentially influences the development of West Nile virus-specific B cell responses in mice following immunization with RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus vaccine candidate.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2013
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Recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) results in the activation of innate signaling pathways that drive the innate immune response and ultimately shape the adaptive immune response. RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus (SCFV) vaccine candidate derived from West Nile virus (WNV), is intrinsically adjuvanted with multiple PAMPs and induces a vigorous anti-WNV humoral response. However, the innate mechanisms that link pattern recognition and development of vigorous antigen-specific B cell responses are not completely understood. Moreover, the roles of individual PRR signaling pathways in shaping the B cell response to this live attenuated SCFV vaccine have not been established. We examined and compared the role of TLR3- and MyD88-dependent signaling in the development of anti-WNV-specific antibody-secreting cell responses and memory B cell responses induced by RepliVAX WN. We found that MyD88 deficiency significantly diminished B cell responses by impairing B cell activation, development of germinal centers (GC), and the generation of long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) and memory B cells (MBCs). In contrast, TLR3 deficiency had more effect on maintenance of GCs and development of LLPCs, whereas differentiation of MBCs was unaffected. Our data suggest that both TLR3- and MyD88-dependent signaling are involved in the intrinsic adjuvanting of RepliVAX WN and differentially contribute to the development of vigorous WNV-specific antibody and B cell memory responses following immunization with this novel SCFV vaccine.
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Diversity among human non-typhoidal salmonellae isolates from Zimbabwe.
Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2013
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Non-typhoidal Salmonella infections are an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, especially among children and HIV-seropositive patients in whom they may cause invasive disease.
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Contemporary and optimal medical management of peripheral arterial disease.
Surg. Clin. North Am.
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2013
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Atherosclerotic lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent condition associated with a significant increase in risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PAD is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Treatment is focused on (1) lowering cardiovascular risk and cardiovascular disease event rates and (2) improvement in symptoms and quality of life. Multidisciplinary and intersociety guidelines guide optimal medical therapy. Substantial evidence supports implementation of tobacco cessation counseling and pharmacotherapy to help achieve tobacco abstinence, antiplatelet therapy, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) therapy, and antihypertensive therapy for the purpose of lowering cardiovascular event rates and improving survival.
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Synthetic generation of influenza vaccine viruses for rapid response to pandemics.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2013
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During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, vaccines for the virus became available in large quantities only after human infections peaked. To accelerate vaccine availability for future pandemics, we developed a synthetic approach that very rapidly generated vaccine viruses from sequence data. Beginning with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences, we combined an enzymatic, cell-free gene assembly technique with enzymatic error correction to allow rapid, accurate gene synthesis. We then used these synthetic HA and NA genes to transfect Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that were qualified for vaccine manufacture with viral RNA expression constructs encoding HA and NA and plasmid DNAs encoding viral backbone genes. Viruses for use in vaccines were rescued from these MDCK cells. We performed this rescue with improved vaccine virus backbones, increasing the yield of the essential vaccine antigen, HA. Generation of synthetic vaccine seeds, together with more efficient vaccine release assays, would accelerate responses to influenza pandemics through a system of instantaneous electronic data exchange followed by real-time, geographically dispersed vaccine production.
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Improving influenza virus backbones by including terminal regions of MDCK-adapted strains on hemagglutinin and neuraminidase gene segments.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2013
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Reverse genetics approaches can simplify and accelerate the process of vaccine manufacturing by combining the desired genome segments encoding the surface glycoproteins from influenza strains with genome segments (backbone segments) encoding internal and non-structural proteins from high-growth strains. We have developed three optimized high-growth backbones for use in producing vaccine seed viruses for group A influenza strains. Here we show that we can further enhance the productivity of our three optimized backbones by using chimeric hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genome segments containing terminal regions (non-coding regions (NCRs) and coding regions for the signal peptide (SP), transmembrane domain (TMD), and cytoplasmic tail (CT)) from two MDCK-adapted high growth strains (PR8x and Hes) and the sequences encoding the ectodomains of the A/Brisbane/10/2010 (H1N1) HA and NA proteins. Viruses in which both the HA and NA genome segments had the high-growth terminal regions produced higher HA yields than viruses that contained one WT and one chimeric HA or NA genome segment. Studies on our best-performing backbone indicated that the increases in HA yield were also reflected in an increase in HA content in partially purified preparations. Our results show that the use of chimeric HA and NA segments with high-growth backbones is a viable strategy that could improve influenza vaccine manufacturing. Possible mechanisms for the enhancement of HA yield are discussed.
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Engineered alphavirus replicon vaccines based on known attenuated viral mutants show limited effects on immunogenicity.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2013
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The immunogenicity of alphavirus replicon vaccines is determined by many factors including the level of antigen expression and induction of innate immune responses. Characterized attenuated alphavirus mutants contain changes to the genomic 5 UTR and mutations that result in altered non-structural protein cleavage timing leading to altered levels of antigen expression and interferon (IFN) induction. In an attempt to create more potent replicon vaccines, we engineered a panel of Venezuelan equine encephalitis-Sindbis virus chimeric replicons that contained these attenuating mutations. Modified replicons were ranked for antigen expression and IFN induction levels in cell culture and then evaluated in mice. The results of these studies showed that differences in antigen production and IFN induction in vitro did not correlate with large changes in immunogenicity in vivo. These findings indicate that the complex interactions between innate immune response and the replicons ability to express antigen complicate rational design of more potent alphavirus replicons.
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Generation of a parvovirus B19 vaccine candidate.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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Parvovirus B19 is the causative agent of fifth disease in children, aplastic crisis in those with blood dyscrasias, and hydrops fetalis. Previous parvovirus B19 virus-like-particle (VLP) vaccine candidates were produced by co-infection of insect cells with two baculoviruses, one expressing wild-type VP1 and the other expressing VP2. In humans, the VLPs were immunogenic but reactogenic. We have developed new VLP-based parvovirus B19 vaccine candidates, produced by co-expressing VP2 and either wild-type VP1 or phospholipase-negative VP1 in a regulated ratio from a single plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These VLPs are expressed efficiently, are very homogeneous, and can be highly purified. Although VP2 alone can form VLPs, in mouse immunizations, VP1 and the adjuvant MF59 are required to elicit a neutralizing response. Wild-type VLPs and those with phospholipase-negative VP1 are equivalently potent. The purity, homogeneity, yeast origin, and lack of phospholipase activity of these VLPs address potential causes of previously observed reactogenicity.
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Changes in the burden of malaria following scale up of malaria control interventions in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe.
Malar. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2013
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To better understand trends in the burden of malaria and their temporal relationship to control activities, a survey was conducted to assess reported cases of malaria and malaria control activities in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe.
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Microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility assay for the diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis in Harare, Zimbabwe.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
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Limited data exist on use of the microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility (MODS) assay among persons suspected of MDR-TB living in high HIV-prevalence settings.
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Increasing adolescent HIV prevalence in Eastern Zimbabwe--evidence of long-term survivors of mother-to-child transmission?
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Recent data from the Manicaland HIV/STD Prevention Project, a general-population open HIV cohort study, suggested that between 2004 and 2007 HIV prevalence amongst males aged 15-17 years in eastern Zimbabwe increased from 1.20% to 2.23%, and in females remained unchanged at 2.23% to 2.39%, while prevalence continued to decline in the rest of the adult population. We assess whether the more likely source of the increase in adolescent HIV prevalence is recent sexual HIV acquisition, or the aging of long-term survivors of perinatal HIV acquisition that occurred during the early growth of the epidemic. Using data collected between August 2006 and November 2008, we investigated associations between adolescent HIV and (1) maternal orphanhood and maternal HIV status, (2) reported sexual behaviour, and (3) reporting recurring sickness or chronic illness, suggesting infected adolescents might be in a late stage of HIV infection. HIV-infected adolescent males were more likely to be maternal orphans (RR = 2.97, p<0.001) and both HIV-infected adolescent males and females were more likely to be maternal orphans or have an HIV-infected mother (male RR = 1.83, p<0.001; female RR = 16.6, p<0.001). None of 22 HIV-infected adolescent males and only three of 23 HIV-infected females reported ever having had sex. HIV-infected adolescents were 60% more likely to report illness than HIV-infected young adults. Taken together, all three hypotheses suggest that recent increases in adolescent HIV prevalence in eastern Zimbabwe are more likely attributable to long-term survival of mother-to-child transmission rather than increases in risky sexual behaviour. HIV prevalence in adolescents and young adults cannot be used as a surrogate for recent HIV incidence, and health systems should prepare for increasing numbers of long-term infected adolescents.
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Challenges and prospects for malaria elimination in the Southern Africa region.
Acta Trop.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2011
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The burden of malaria has decreased dramatically within the past several years in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, including regions of Southern Africa. Important to effective regional malaria control in Southern Africa is the appreciation that the reductions in malaria have not been achieved uniformly, with some countries experiencing resurgence. Understanding the reasons for sustained low-level malaria transmission in the face of control efforts, why malaria control efforts have not been successful in particular epidemiological settings and the epidemiological and transmission patterns following resurgence are critical to improving further malaria control and possible elimination. The overall goal of the International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research in Southern Africa is to contribute to regional malaria control efforts that can be sustained beyond the duration of the project. This goal will be achieved through a combination of: (1) state-of-the-art research on malaria epidemiology, vector biology and the genetics of the malaria parasite in three different epidemiological settings; (2) collaborations with national malaria control programs to develop locally adapted and sustainable control strategies; and (3) training, career development and capacity building at research institutions throughout the region.
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Potential impact of reactive vaccination in controlling cholera outbreaks: an exploratory analysis using a Zimbabwean experience.
S. Afr. Med. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2011
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To contain ongoing cholera outbreaks, the World Health Organization has suggested that reactive vaccination should be considered in addition to its previous control measures.
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Analyses of mutations selected by passaging a chimeric flavivirus identify mutations that alter infectivity and reveal an interaction between the structural proteins and the nonstructural glycoprotein NS1.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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We previously described a single-cycle dengue vaccine (RepliVAX D2) engineered from a capsid (C) gene-deleted West Nile virus (WNV) expressing dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2) prM/E genes in place of the corresponding WNV genes. That work demonstrated that adaptation of RepliVAX D2 to grow in WNV C-expressing cells resulted in acquisition of non-synonymous mutations in the DENV2 prM/E and WNV NS2A/NS3 genes. Here we demonstrate that the prM/E mutations increase the specific infectivity of chimeric virions and the NS2A/NS3 mutations independently enhance packaging. Studies with the NS2A mutant demonstrated that it was unable to produce a larger form of NS1 (NS1), suggesting that the mutation had been selected to eliminate a ribosomal frame-shift "slippage site" in NS2A. Evaluation of a synonymous mutation at this slippage site confirmed that genomes that failed to make NS1 were packaged more efficiently than WT genomes supporting a role for NS1/NS1 in orchestrating virion assembly.
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Enhancing the utility of a prM/E-expressing chimeric vaccine for Japanese encephalitis by addition of the JEV NS1 gene.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2011
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Recently, we demonstrated that a single-cycle West Nile virus (WNV) named RepliVAX WN could be used to produce a chimeric Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine (RepliVAX JE) by replacing the WNV prM/E genes with those of JEV. Here, we tested if replacement of WNV NS1 gene in RepliVAX JE with that of JEV (producing TripliVAX JE) could produce a superior vaccine. TripliVAX JE elicited higher anti-E immunity and displayed better efficacy in mice than RepliVAX JE. Furthermore, TripliVAX JE displayed reduced immune interference caused by pre-existing anti-NS1 immunity. Thus, we propose prM/E/NS1 chimerization as a new strategy for flavivirus vaccine development.
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Repeated in vivo stimulation of T and B cell responses in old mice generates protective immunity against lethal West Nile virus encephalitis.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2011
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Older adults exhibit higher morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases compared with those of the general population. The introduction and rapid spread of West Nile virus (WNV) throughout the continental United States since 1999 has highlighted the challenge of protecting older adults against emerging pathogens: to this day there is no therapy or vaccine approved for human use against West Nile encephalitis. In this study, we describe the characterization of T and B cell responses in old mice after vaccination with RepliVAX WN, a novel West Nile encephalitis vaccine based on single-cycle flavivirus particles. In adult mice, RepliVAX WN induced robust and long-lasting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell and Ab (B cell) responses against natural WNV epitopes, similar to those elicited by primary WNV infection. Primary and memory T and B cell responses in old mice against RepliVAX WN vaccination were significantly lower than those seen in younger mice, similar to the response of old mice to infection with WNV. Surprisingly, both the quality and the quantity of the recall Ab and T cell responses in vaccinated old mice were improved to equal or exceed those in adult animals. Moreover, these responses together (but not individually) were sufficient to protect both old and adult mice from severe WNV disease upon challenge. Therefore, at least two cycles of in vivo restimulation are needed for selection and expansion of protective lymphocytes in older populations, and live, single-cycle virus vaccines that stimulate both cellular and humoral immunity can protect older individuals against severe viral disease.
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Malaria epidemiology and control in Southern Africa.
Acta Trop.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2011
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The burden of malaria has decreased dramatically within the past several years in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, following the scale-up of interventions supported by the Roll Back Malaria Partnership, the Presidents Malaria Initiative and other partners. It is important to appreciate that the reductions in malaria have not been uniform between and within countries, with some areas experiencing resurgence instead. Furthermore, while interventions have greatly reduced the burden of malaria in many countries, it is also recognized that the malaria decline pre-dated widespread intervention efforts, at least in some cases where data are available. This raises more questions as what other factors may have been contributing to the reduction in malaria transmission and to what extent. The International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) in Southern Africa aims to better understand the underlying malaria epidemiology, vector ecology and parasite genomics using three contrasting settings of malaria transmission in Zambia and Zimbabwe: an area of successful malaria control, an area of resurgent malaria and an area where interventions have not been effective. The Southern Africa ICEMR will capitalize on the opportunity to investigate the complexities of malaria transmission while adapting to intervention and establish the evidence-base to guide effective and sustainable malaria intervention strategies. Key approaches to attain this goal for the region will include close collaboration with national malaria control programs and contribution to capacity building at the individual, institutional and national levels.
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Comparison of two active case-finding strategies for community-based diagnosis of symptomatic smear-positive tuberculosis and control of infectious tuberculosis in Harare, Zimbabwe (DETECTB): a cluster-randomised trial.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2010
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Control of tuberculosis in settings with high HIV prevalence is a pressing public health priority. We tested two active case-finding strategies to target long periods of infectiousness before diagnosis, which is typical of HIV-negative tuberculosis and is a key driver of transmission.
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Immunogenicity of RepliVAX WN, a novel single-cycle West Nile virus vaccine.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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We recently reported that immunization with RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine, protected mice against WNV challenge. We have extended these studies by characterizing the RepliVAX WN-elicited antibody and T cell responses. WNV-specific IgG antibody responses comprised predominantly of IgG(2c) and IgG(2b) subclasses were detected 8 months after immunization. Vigorous WNV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses directed at both structural and nonstructural WNV proteins were detected which were characterized by cytolytic activity and secretion of IFN-? and TNF-?. Importantly, RepliVAX WN immunization resulted in vigorous CD8(+) memory T cell responses detected at 8 months after immunization.
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Simultaneous detection of avian influenza virus NP and H5 antibodies in chicken sera using a fluorescence microsphere immunoassay.
Avian Dis.
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2010
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Avian influenza (AI) surveillance in commercial poultry is accomplished by detecting the presence of antibodies to two group-specific antigens, NP and M1, using the agar gel immunodiffusion test. In order to determine the viral subtype responsible for the infection, positive samples must be further subtyped using the hemagglutination inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition tests. These tests are labor intensive and may take up to 4 days, thus slowing down responses to outbreaks. To expedite the subtyping of chicken sera we have developed a multiplex fluorescence microsphere immunoassay (FMIA), which allows for the simultaneous detection and subtyping of chicken sera to H5 influenza viruses. The FMIA was developed using NP (full length) and H5 (HA1 region) proteins expressed in baby hamster kidney cells using a Venezuela equine encephalitis virus replicon system. Both proteins were tagged with 6xHis at the carboxy-end and purified using cobalt-coated agarose beads. Purified H5 protein showed minimal cross-reactivity with anti-H2 serum, while no cross-reactivity was observed with sera to other AI virus (AIV) subtypes and other important poultry viral pathogens. In addition, and as expected, all the AIV sera tested reacted strongly with purified NP protein. Our results indicate that FMIA can be used for rapid subtyping of chicken sera.
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Evaluation of RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus vaccine, in a non-human primate model of West Nile virus infection.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2010
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West Nile virus (WNV) causes serious neurologic disease, but no licensed vaccines are available to prevent this disease in humans. We have developed RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus with an expected safety profile superior to other types of live-attenuated viral vaccines. In this report we describe studies examining RepliVAX WN safety, potency, and efficacy in a non-human primate model of WNV infection. A single immunization of four rhesus macaques with RepliVAX WN was safe and elicited detectable neutralizing antibody titers and IgM and IgG responses, and IgG titers were increased in two animals that received a second immunization. After challenge with WNV, three of four immunized animals were completely protected from viremia, and the remaining animal showed minimal viremia on one day. In contrast, the unvaccinated animal developed viremia that lasted six days. These results demonstrate the efficacy and safety of RepliVAX WN in this primate model of WNV infection.
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Conjugation to nickel-chelating nanolipoprotein particles increases the potency and efficacy of subunit vaccines to prevent West Nile encephalitis.
Bioconjug. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2010
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Subunit antigens are attractive candidates for vaccine development, as they are safe, cost-effective, and rapidly produced. Nevertheless, subunit antigens often need to be adjuvanted and/or formulated to produce products with acceptable potency and efficacy. Here, we describe a simple method for improving the potency and efficacy of a recombinant subunit antigen by its immobilization on nickel-chelating nanolipoprotein particles (NiNLPs). NiNLPs are membrane mimetic nanoparticles that provide a delivery and presentation platform amenable to binding any recombinant subunit immunogens featuring a polyhistidine tag. A His-tagged, soluble truncated form of the West Nile virus (WNV) envelope protein (trE-His) was immobilized on NiNLPs. Single inoculations of the NiNLP-trE-His produced superior anti-WNV immune responses and provided significantly improved protection against a live WNV challenge compared to mice inoculated with trE-His alone. These results have broad implications in vaccine development and optimization, as NiNLP technology is well-suited to many types of vaccines, providing a universal platform for enhancing the potency and efficacy of recombinant subunit immunogens.
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Mutations at positions 186 and 194 in the HA gene of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus improve replication in cell culture and eggs.
Virol. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2010
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Obtaining suitable seed viruses for influenza vaccines poses a challenge for public health authorities and manufacturers. We used reverse genetics to generate vaccine seed-compatible viruses from the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus. Comparison of viruses recovered with variations in residues 186 and 194 (based on the H3 numbering system) of the viral hemagglutinin showed that these viruses differed with respect to their ability to grow in eggs and cultured cells. Thus, we have demonstrated that molecular cloning of members of a quasispecies can help in selection of seed viruses for vaccine manufacture.
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Provider-initiated symptom screening for tuberculosis in Zimbabwe: diagnostic value and the effect of HIV status.
Bull. World Health Organ.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2010
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To assess the diagnostic value of provider-initiated symptom screening for tuberculosis (TB) and how HIV status affects it.
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Descriptive spatial analysis of the cholera epidemic 2008-2009 in Harare, Zimbabwe: a secondary data analysis.
Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2010
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This ecological study describes the cholera epidemic in Harare during 2008-2009 and identifies patterns that may explain transmission. Rates ratios of cholera cases by suburb were calculated by a univariate regression Poisson model and then, through an Empirical Bayes modelling, smoothed rate ratios were estimated and represented geographically. Mbare and southwest suburbs of Harare presented higher rate ratios. Suburbs attack rates ranged from 1.2 (95% Cl = 0.7-1.6) cases per 1000 people in Tynwald to 90.3 (95% Cl = 82.8-98.2) in Hopley. The identification of this spatial pattern in the spread, characterised by low risk in low density residential housing, and a higher risk in high density south west suburbs and Mbare, could be used to advocate for improving water and sanitation conditions and specific preparedness measures in the most affected areas.
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Identifying recent Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in the setting of high HIV and TB burden.
Thorax
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2010
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Accurate diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in recently exposed HIV-infected tuberculosis (TB) contacts is a public health priority because of the high risk of progression to active TB but is hampered by the high background prevalence of LTBI in high-burden populations and poor sensitivity of tuberculin skin testing (TST) in HIV co-infection.
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The risk and timing of tuberculosis diagnosed in smear-negative TB suspects: a 12 month cohort study in Harare, Zimbabwe.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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Cases of smear-negative TB have increased dramatically in high prevalence HIV settings and pose considerable diagnostic and management challenges.
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Measuring and correcting biased child mortality statistics in countries with generalized epidemics of HIV infection.
Bull. World Health Organ.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2010
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Under Millennium Development Goal 4, countries are required to reduce child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In countries with generalized epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, standard statistics based on fertility history may misrepresent progress towards this target owing to the correlation between deaths among mothers and early childhood deaths from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
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The NS5 protein of the virulent West Nile virus NY99 strain is a potent antagonist of type I interferon-mediated JAK-STAT signaling.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2010
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Flaviviruses transmitted by arthropods represent a tremendous disease burden for humans, causing millions of infections annually. All vector-borne flaviviruses studied to date suppress host innate responses to infection by inhibiting alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta)-mediated JAK-STAT signal transduction. The viral nonstructural protein NS5 of some flaviviruses functions as the major IFN antagonist, associated with inhibition of IFN-dependent STAT1 phosphorylation (pY-STAT1) or with STAT2 degradation. West Nile virus (WNV) infection prevents pY-STAT1 although a role for WNV NS5 in IFN antagonism has not been fully explored. Here, we report that NS5 from the virulent NY99 strain of WNV prevented pY-STAT1 accumulation, suppressed IFN-dependent gene expression, and rescued the growth of a highly IFN-sensitive virus (Newcastle disease virus) in the presence of IFN, suggesting that this protein can function as an efficient IFN antagonist. In contrast, NS5 from Kunjin virus (KUN), a naturally attenuated subtype of WNV, was a poor suppressor of pY-STAT1. Mutation of a single residue in KUN NS5 to the analogous residue in WNV-NY99 NS5 (S653F) rendered KUN NS5 an efficient inhibitor of pY-STAT1. Incorporation of this mutation into recombinant KUN resulted in 30-fold greater inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling than with the wild-type virus and enhanced KUN replication in the presence of IFN. Thus, a naturally occurring mutation is associated with the function of NS5 in IFN antagonism and may influence virulence of WNV field isolates.
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Human RNA polymerase I-driven reverse genetics for influenza a virus in canine cells.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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We have established a human RNA polymerase I (pol I)-driven influenza virus reverse genetics (RG) system in the Madin-Darby canine kidney 33016-PF cell line, which is approved for influenza vaccine manufacture. RNA pol I polymerases are generally active only in cells of species closely related to the species of origin of the polymerases. Nevertheless, we show that a nonendogenous RNA pol I promoter drives efficient rescue of influenza A viruses in a canine cell line. Application of this system allows efficient generation of virus strains and presents an alternative approach for influenza vaccine production.
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Schistosomiasis PCR in vaginal lavage as an indicator of genital Schistosoma haematobium infection in rural Zimbabwean women.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2009
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Schistosoma real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive and specific in urine and stool. We sought to explore the relationship between genital schistosomiasis and the Schistosoma PCR in women. PCR was run on 83 vaginal lavage samples from a rural Zimbabwean population. Women underwent clinical and colposcopic investigations, analyses for sexually transmitted infections, and genital schistosomiasis. Thirty samples were positive for Schistosoma PCR: 12 were strong and 18 were weak positive. Sensitivity (67%) and specificity (83%) were best in women below the age of 25 years. A positive schistosome PCR result was associated with S. haematobium ova in genital tissue, so-called sandy patches, and bleeding. Prevalence determined by PCR were lower and real-time PCR values were weaker in older women. The presence of Schistosoma DNA may be greater in the recent lesions (e.g., in younger women). For diagnosis in rural areas and in large studies, Schistosoma PCR could become a supplement to gynecologic examinations.
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Contrasting causal pathways contribute to poorer health and nutrition outcomes in orphans in Zimbabwe.
Vulnerable Child Youth Stud
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2009
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Orphaned children have been found to be at greater risk of poor health and malnutrition compared to non-orphans in sub-Saharan African countries. However, levels of disadvantage vary by location and little is known about the causal pathways that lead from orphanhood to poorer health and malnutrition. Aggregate data from recent Demographic and Health Surveys in 22 countries were used to compare overall levels of ill-health and malnutrition by orphan status. Data from the Manicaland Child Cohort Study in Zimbabwe - a closed cohort study with detailed longitudinal information on orphans experience - were used to describe how patterns of ill-health and malnutrition alter over the childs life-course and to test causal pathways between orphanhood and ill-health and malnutrition, hypothesized in a previously published theoretical frame-work. Modest increases in ill-health and malnutrition were found in orphans in the Demographic and Health Surveys data, with maternal and double orphans being worst affected. Non-significant associations were found between orphanhood and ill-health in the Manicaland Child Cohort Study data, but no associations with malnutrition were found. None the less, smaller increases in body mass index with age were seen among orphans (ologit test for difference: adjusted odds ratio = 0.68; p = 0.07) and maternal orphans (ologit test for difference: adjusted odds ratio = 0.67; p = 0.03) than among non-orphans. Stigma and discrimination contributed to poor diet, malnutrition and ill-health in children whose mothers had died, while heightened poverty was a more important factor for paternal orphans. These results suggest social and psychological support for orphans and their families could be as important as material support in preventing malnutrition and ill-health.
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West Nile virus genome amplification requires the functional activities of the proteasome.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2009
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The lifecycle of intracellular pathogens, especially viruses, is intimately tied to the macromolecular synthetic processes of their host cell. In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the ability to translate and, thus, replicate their infecting genome is dependent upon hijacking host proteins. To identify proteins that participate in West Nile virus (WNV) replication, we tested the ability of siRNAs designed to knock-down the expression of a large subset of human genes to interfere with replication of WNV replicons. Here we report that multiple siRNAs for proteasome subunits interfered with WNV genome amplification. Specificity of the interference was shown by demonstrating that silencing proteasome subunits did not interfere with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicons. Drugs that blocked proteasome activity were potent inhibitors of WNV genome amplification even if cells were treated 12 h after infection, indicating that the proteasome is required at a post-entry stage(s) of the WNV infection cycle.
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Construction and characterization of a stable subgenomic replicon system of a Brazilian dengue virus type 3 strain (BR DEN3 290-02).
J. Virol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2009
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Dengue viruses (DENV) cause the most common arboviral disease afflicting men. Clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The mechanisms involved in the disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. The severity of the disease seems to be influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of DENV can be used to study viral replication mechanisms and evaluate the effects of antiviral drugs on viral replication. The objective was to generate and characterize biologically a replicon from a clinical isolate of DENV-3, as part of our studies to understand how this new isolate interacts with cells. To obtain this replicon several RT-PCR fragments encoding the non-structural proteins genes were cloned in high-copy vectors, and used to assemble the replicon in a BAC plasmid vector containing a synthetic DNA molecule encoding the 5 and 3 ends of a viral cDNA with a T7 DNA-dependent RNA polymerase promoter and a ribozyme. In vitro transcribed RNA recovered from this BAC plasmid was transfected into C6/36 mosquito cells, and dengue virus protein expression was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies. The results showed that the replicon was replicated efficiently in cells, demonstrating successful assembly of a DENV-3 replicon.
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West nile virus capsid degradation of claudin proteins disrupts epithelial barrier function.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2009
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During acute infection, West Nile virus (WNV) has been reported to infect a variety of cell types in various tissues of both experimentally and naturally infected hosts. Virus infects epithelial cells in the skin, kidney, intestine, and testes, although the importance of these findings is unclear. In the current study, we have observed that WNV infection of kidney tubules in mice coincides with the loss of expression of several members of the claudin family. Proteins of this family are often involved in epithelial barrier formation and function. WNV infection of epithelial cells in culture resulted in a decrease in the transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in the efflux of mannitol across the monolayer, and a loss of intracellular levels of claudin-1 to -4. WNV capsid alone was sufficient for the degradation event, which was mediated through lysosomal proteases. Since epithelial cells are frequent sites of WNV infection, these observations imply a potential mechanism for virus dissemination and extraneural pathogenesis.
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Immobilization of His-tagged proteins on nickel-chelating nanolipoprotein particles.
Bioconjug. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2009
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Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) are nanometer-sized, discoidal particles that self-assemble from purified apolipoprotein and phospholipid. Their size and facile functionalization suggest potential application of NLPs as platforms for the presentation and delivery of recombinant proteins. To this end, we investigated incorporation of nickel-chelating lipids into NLPs (NiNLPs) and subsequent sequestration of polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins. From initial lipid screens for NLP formation, the two phospholipids DMPC and DOPC were identified as suitable bulk lipids for incorporation of the nickel-chelating lipid DOGS-NTA-Ni into NLPs, and NiNLPs were successfully formed with varying amounts of DOGS-NTA-Ni. NiNLPs consisting of 10% DOGS-NTA-Ni with 90% bulk lipid (either DMPC or DOPC) were thoroughly characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), non-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (NDGGE), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three different His-tagged proteins were sequestered on NiNLPs in a nickel-dependent manner, and the amount of immobilized protein was contingent on the size and composition of the NiNLP.
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Antiviral activity of geneticin against dengue virus.
Antiviral Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2009
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The aminoglycoside, geneticin (G418), was recently shown to have antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Since BVDV, dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV) all belong to the Flaviviridae family, it seemed possible that a common step in their life cycle might be affected by this aminoglycoside. Here it is shown that geneticin prevented the cytopathic effect (CPE) resulting from DENV-2 infection of BHK cells, in a dose-dependent manner with an 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) value of 3+/-0.4microg/ml. Geneticin had no detectable effect on CPE caused by YFV in BHK cells. Geneticin also inhibited DENV-2 viral yield with an EC(50) value of 2+/-0.1microg/ml and an EC(90) value of 20+/-2microg/ml. With a CC(50) value of 165+/-5microg/ml, the selectivity index of anti-DENV activity of geneticin in BHK cells was established to be 66. Furthermore, 25microg/ml of geneticin nearly completely blocked plaque formation induced by DENV-2, but not YFV. In addition, geneticin, inhibited DENV-2 viral RNA replication and viral translation. Gentamicin, kanamycin, and the guanidinylated geneticin showed no anti-DENV activity. Neomycin and paromomycin demonstrated weak antiviral activity at high concentrations. Finally, aminoglycoside-3-phosphotransferase activity of neomycin-resistant gene abolished antiviral activity of geneticin.
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Zimbabwe experiences the worst epidemic of cholera in Africa.
J Infect Dev Ctries
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2009
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A severe outbreak of cholera has been reported in Zimbabwe since mid 2008, with so far over 92,000 cases and over 4,000 deaths. This outbreak has differed from previous outbreaks in being mainly urban and with a high case-fatality rate. Breakdown in the supply of clean water has been the main underlying cause but breakdown in health service delivery in Zimbabwe has also contributed to the magnitude and severity of the outbreak.
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Novel imino sugar derivatives demonstrate potent antiviral activity against flaviviruses.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2009
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Imino sugars, such as N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin and N-nonyl-deoxynojirimycin (NNDNJ), are glucose analogues that selectively inhibit cellular alpha-glucosidase I and II in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibit antiviral activities against many types of enveloped viruses. Although these molecules have broad-spectrum antiviral activity, their development has been limited by a lack of efficacy and/or selectivity. We have previously reported that a DNJ derivative with a hydroxylated cyclohexyl side chain, called OSL-95II, has an antiviral efficacy similar to that of NNDNJ but significantly less toxicity. Building upon this observation, a family of imino sugar derivatives containing an oxygenated side chain and terminally restricted ring structures were synthesized and shown to have low cytotoxicity and superior antiviral activity against members of the Flaviviridae family, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus (DENV), and West Nile virus. Of particular interest is that several of these novel imino sugar derivatives, such as PBDNJ0801, PBDNJ0803, and PBDNJ0804, potently inhibit DENV infection in vitro, with 90% effective concentration values at submicromolar concentrations and selectivity indices greater than 800. Therefore, these compounds represent the best in their class and may offer realistic candidates for the development of antiviral therapeutics against human DENV infections.
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Construction and characterization of a single-cycle chimeric flavivirus vaccine candidate that protects mice against lethal challenge with dengue virus type 2.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2009
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We have previously described a novel flavivirus vaccine technology based on a single-cycle, capsid (C) gene-deleted flavivirus called RepliVAX. RepliVAX can be propagated in cells that express high levels of C but undergoes only a single cycle of infection in vaccinated hosts. Here we report that we have adapted our RepliVAX technology to produce a dengue vaccine by replacing the prM/E genes of RepliVAX WN (a West Nile virus [WNV] RepliVAX) with the same genes of dengue virus type 2 (DENV2). Our first RepliVAX construct for dengue virus (RepliVAX D2) replicated poorly in WNV C-expressing cells. However, addition of mutations in prM and E that were selected during blind passage of a RepliVAX D2 derivative was used to produce a second-generation RepliVAX D2 (designated D2.2) that displayed acceptable growth in WNV C-expressing cells. RepliVAX D2.2 grew better in DENV2 C-expressing cells than WNV C-expressing cells, but after several passages in DENV2 C-expressing cells it acquired further mutations that permitted efficient growth in WNV C-expressing cells. We tested the potency and efficacy of RepliVAX D2.2 in a well-described immunodeficient mouse model for dengue (strain AG129; lacking the receptors for both type I and type II interferons). These mice produced dose-dependent DENV2-neutralizing antibody responses when vaccinated with RepliVAX D2.2. When challenged with 240 50% lethal doses of DENV2, mice given a single inoculation of RepliVAX D2.2 survived significantly longer than sham-vaccinated animals, although some of these severely immunocompromised mice eventually died from the challenge. Taken together these studies indicate that the RepliVAX technology shows promise for use in the development of vaccines that can be used to prevent dengue.
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RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus vaccine to prevent West Nile disease, elicits durable protective immunity in hamsters.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2009
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West Nile virus (WNV) causes significant disease, yet no vaccines exist to prevent WN disease in humans. We have previously reported that RepliVAX WN is a safe and efficacious vaccine in mouse and hamster models of WN disease. Here, we report that vaccination of hamsters with RepliVAX WN induces antibody responses that remain stable for at least 6 months. Furthermore, animals challenged with virulent WNV 6 months after vaccination were protected from disease as well as those challenged 2 months post-vaccination, with no vaccinated animals succumbing to WNV challenge. These results indicate that RepliVAX is capable of inducing durable protective immunity after a single dose.
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Vectored co-delivery of human cytomegalovirus gH and gL proteins elicits potent complement-independent neutralizing antibodies.
Vaccine
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Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) is prevalent worldwide with infection generally being asymptomatic. Nevertheless, hCMV infection can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Primary infection of seronegative women or reactivation/re-infection of seropositive women during pregnancy can result in transmission to the fetus, leading to severe neurological defects. In addition, hCMV is the most common viral infection in immunosuppressed organ transplant recipients and can produce serious complications. Hence, a safe and effective vaccine to prevent hCMV infection is an unmet medical need. Neutralizing antibodies to several hCMV glycoproteins, and complexes thereof, have been identified in individuals following hCMV infection. Interestingly, a portion of the CMV-specific neutralizing antibody responses are directed to epitopes found on glycoprotein complexes but not the individual proteins. Using an alphavirus replicon particle (VRP) vaccine platform, we showed that bicistronic VRPs encoding hCMV gH and gL glycoproteins produce gH/gL complexes in vitro. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with these gH/gL-expressing VRPs produced broadly cross-reactive complement-independent neutralizing antibodies to hCMV. These neutralizing antibody responses were of higher titer than those elicited in mice vaccinated with monocistronic VRPs encoding gH or gL antigens, and they were substantially more potent than those raised by VRPs encoding gB. These findings underscore the utility of co-delivery of glycoprotein components such as gH and gL for eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing immune responses against hCMV, and indicate that the gH/gL complex represents a potential target for future hCMV vaccine development.
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The next generation recombinant human cytomegalovirus vaccine candidates-beyond gB.
Vaccine
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Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects the majority of the global population and persists within the infected host for life; infection of healthy adults rarely leads to severe acute clinical symptoms. In contrast, HCMV is a leading infectious cause of congenital disease and a common cause of complications in transplant recipients. A vaccine to prevent HCMV disease in these populations is a widely recognized medical need. We review recent advances in our understanding of the candidate vaccine antigens and published clinical trial data for the four most recent HCMV vaccine candidates: a gB subunit adjuvanted with MF59, a DNA vaccine expressing gB and pp65, alphavirus replicon particles (VRPs) expressing gB and a pp65-IE1 fusion protein, and a pp65 peptide vaccine. The candidates are safe, although some adverse events were reported for an adjuvanted variant of the pp65 peptide vaccine. The gB/MF59 vaccine elicited strong humoral responses with limited durability. The gB/pp65 DNA vaccine elicited cellular immunity, and the pp65 peptide vaccine elicited modest cellular immunity, but only when formulated with an adjuvant. Only the VRP vaccine expressing gB and pp65-IE1 elicited both humoral and cellular immunity. The gB/MF59 vaccine showed a short-term 50% efficacy at preventing infection of seronegative women and significantly reduced viremia and need for antivirals in solid organ transplant recipients, and the gB/pp65 DNA vaccine showed signs of clinical benefit in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Importantly, the partial efficacy of the subunit and DNA vaccines is new evidence that both humoral and cellular immunity contribute to controlling HCMV-related disease. These data show the clinical feasibility of a recombinant HCMV vaccine. We discuss areas for potential improvements in the next generation of vaccine candidates.
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Activated nucleation of vortices in a dipole-blockaded supersolid condensate.
Phys. Rev. Lett.
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We investigate theoretically and numerically a model of a supersolid in a dipole-blockaded Bose-Einstein condensate. The dependence of the superfluid fraction with an imposed thermal bath and a uniform boost velocity on the condensate is considered. Specifically, we observe a critical velocity for the nucleation of vortices in our system that is strongly linked to a steplike decrease in the superfluid fraction. We are able to use a scaling argument based on the energy required to activate a vortex, relating the critical temperature to the critical velocity, and find that this relationship is in good agreement with the numerical simulations carried out on the nonlocal Gross-Pitaevskii equation.
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Nonviral delivery of self-amplifying RNA vaccines.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Despite more than two decades of research and development on nucleic acid vaccines, there is still no commercial product for human use. Taking advantage of the recent innovations in systemic delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) using lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), we developed a self-amplifying RNA vaccine. Here we show that nonviral delivery of a 9-kb self-amplifying RNA encapsulated within an LNP substantially increased immunogenicity compared with delivery of unformulated RNA. This unique vaccine technology was found to elicit broad, potent, and protective immune responses, that were comparable to a viral delivery technology, but without the inherent limitations of viral vectors. Given the many positive attributes of nucleic acid vaccines, our results suggest that a comprehensive evaluation of nonviral technologies to deliver self-amplifying RNA vaccines is warranted.
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Elevation and cholera: an epidemiological spatial analysis of the cholera epidemic in Harare, Zimbabwe, 2008-2009.
BMC Public Health
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In highly populated African urban areas where access to clean water is a challenge, water source contamination is one of the most cited risk factors in a cholera epidemic. During the rainy season, where there is either no sewage disposal or working sewer system, runoff of rains follows the slopes and gets into the lower parts of towns where shallow wells could easily become contaminated by excretes. In cholera endemic areas, spatial information about topographical elevation could help to guide preventive interventions. This study aims to analyze the association between topographic elevation and the distribution of cholera cases in Harare during the cholera epidemic in 2008 and 2009.
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RNA-based vaccines.
Vaccine
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Nucleic acid vaccines consisting of plasmid DNA, viral vectors or RNA may change the way the next generation vaccines are produced, as they have the potential to combine the benefits of live-attenuated vaccines, without the complications often associated with live-attenuated vaccine safety and manufacturing. Over the past two decades, numerous clinical trials of plasmid DNA and viral vector-based vaccines have shown them to be safe, well-tolerated and immunogenic. Yet, sufficient potency for general utility in humans has remained elusive for DNA vaccines and the feasibility of repeated use of viral vectors has been compromised by anti-vector immunity. RNA vaccines, including those based on mRNA and self-amplifying RNA replicons, have the potential to overcome the limitations of plasmid DNA and viral vectors. Possible drawbacks related to the cost and feasibility of manufacturing RNA vaccines are being addressed, increasing the likelihood that RNA-based vaccines will be commercially viable. Proof of concept for RNA vaccines has been demonstrated in humans and the prospects for further development into commercial products are very encouraging.
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Synergistic interactions between the NS3(hel) and E proteins contribute to the virulence of dengue virus type 1.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
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Dengue includes a broad range of symptoms, ranging from fever to hemorrhagic fever and may occasionally have alternative clinical presentations. Many possible viral genetic determinants of the intrinsic virulence of dengue virus (DENV) in the host have been identified, but no conclusive evidence of a correlation between viral genotype and virus transmissibility and pathogenicity has been obtained.
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Evaluation of "Cyscope", a novel fluorescence-based microscopy technique for the detection of malaria.
J Infect Dev Ctries
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This study was designed to compare the detection of malaria parasites in peripheral blood smears using the Cyscope malaria rapid fluorescent microscopic technique and light microscopy of Giemsa-stained smears.
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Intrinsic adjuvanting of a novel single-cycle flavivirus vaccine in the absence of type I interferon receptor signaling.
Vaccine
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Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical for controlling pathogenic virus infections and can enhance immune responses. Hence their impact on the effectiveness of live-attenuated vaccines involves a balance between limiting viral antigen expression and enhancing the development of adaptive immune responses. We examined the influence of type I IFNs on these parameters following immunization with RepliVAX WN, a single-cycle flavivirus vaccine (SCFV) against West Nile virus (WNV) disease. RepliVAX WN-immunized mice produced IFN-? and displayed increased IFN-stimulated gene transcription in draining lymph nodes (LN). SCFV gene expression was over 100 fold-higher on days 1-3 post-infection in type I IFN receptor knockout mice (IFNAR(-/-)) compared to wild-type (wt) mice indicating a profound IFN-mediated suppression of SCFV gene expression in the wt animals. IFNAR(-/-) mice produced nearly equivalent levels of WNV-specific serum IgG and WNV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses compared to wt mice. However, significantly higher numbers of WNV-specific CD8(+) T cells were produced by IFNAR(-/-) mice and a significantly greater percentage of these T cells from IFNAR(-/-) mice produced only IFN-? following antigen-specific re-stimulation. This altered cytokine expression was not associated with increased antigen load suggesting the loss of type I IFN receptor signaling was responsible for the altered quality of the CD8(+) effector T cell response. Together, these results indicate that although type I IFN is not essential for the intrinsic adjuvanting of RepliVAX WN, it plays a role in shaping the cytokine secretion profiles of CD8(+) effector T cells elicited by this SCFV.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.