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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Inter-related in vitro effects of androgens, fatty acids and oxidative stress in prostate cancer: a mechanistic model supporting prevention strategies.
Int. J. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2010
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Oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids (FA) results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which have been postulated to play a key role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PC). We previously reported that androgens increase FA uptake into PC cells. We thus examined if androgens that are known to induce ROS generation regulate FA oxidation in PC cells. The effects of the androgen-depleted medium, R1881 (synthetic androgen) and/or androgen receptor blocker, bicalutamide were examined in the human androgen-responsive but not dependent 22rv1 cells. R1881 supplementation significantly increased mitochondrial FA oxidation ((14)C-radiolabeled FA degradation studies), resulting in increased ROS production. Androgens increased the mRNA levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT1), the rate limiting enzyme in the process of mitochondrial FA oxidation. Treatment with R1881 and bicalutamide inhibited these androgen regulated effects. Inhibition of mitochondrial ROS generation by two different inhibitors, rotenone and thenoyltrifluoroacetone, eliminated the androgen-induced ROS generation, to the same level as in cells deprived of androgens or treated with R1881 and bicalutamide. Taken together, androgens increase the mitochondrial oxidation of FA, leading to increased production of ROS that is associated with prostate cell proliferation and mutagenesis. These results therefore support the rationale for PC prevention using 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, dietary restrictions or anti-oxidants, each of which has different inhibitory but complementary effects.
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Treatment of prosthetic joint infections: validation of a surgical algorithm and proposal of a simplified alternative.
J Arthroplasty
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The Del Pozo and Patel (DPP) algorithm permits to identify suitable candidates for debridement and implant retention (DR) in prosthetic joint infections (PJI), but does not include gram-negative bacilli (GNB) as a risk factor of worst outcome. We conducted a retrospective study to validate the DPP algorithm and propose a simplified algorithm including GNB PJI. From 2002 to 2009, 73 PJI underwent surgery; 55% were chosen according to PDD algorithm. Non-adherence increased the risk of treatment failure (HR = 4.2). Performing DR in the presence of GNB PJI and performing DR in a joint prosthesis implanted for >3 months without hematogenous infection were independent risk factors. Our simplified algorithm, based on these 2 criteria, showed comparable performance to the DPP algorithm but increased eligibility for DR by a 2.4 fold.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.