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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Ganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathogenicity in permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2014
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Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment.
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EVM005: an ectromelia-encoded protein with dual roles in NF-?B inhibition and virulence.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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Poxviruses contain large dsDNA genomes encoding numerous open reading frames that manipulate cellular signalling pathways and interfere with the host immune response. The NF-?B signalling cascade is an important mediator of innate immunity and inflammation, and is tightly regulated by ubiquitination at several key points. A critical step in NF-?B activation is the ubiquitination and degradation of the inhibitor of kappaB (I?B?), by the cellular SCF?-TRCP ubiquitin ligase complex. We show here that upon stimulation with TNF? or IL-1?, Orthopoxvirus-infected cells displayed an accumulation of phosphorylated I?B?, indicating that NF-?B activation was inhibited during poxvirus infection. Ectromelia virus is the causative agent of lethal mousepox, a natural disease that is fatal in mice. Previously, we identified a family of four ectromelia virus genes (EVM002, EVM005, EVM154 and EVM165) that contain N-terminal ankyrin repeats and C-terminal F-box domains that interact with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. Since degradation of I?B? is catalyzed by the SCF?-TRCP ubiquitin ligase, we investigated the role of the ectromelia virus ankyrin/F-box protein, EVM005, in the regulation of NF-?B. Expression of Flag-EVM005 inhibited both TNF?- and IL-1?-stimulated I?B? degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. Inhibition of the NF-?B pathway by EVM005 was dependent on the F-box domain, and interaction with the SCF complex. Additionally, ectromelia virus devoid of EVM005 was shown to inhibit NF-?B activation, despite lacking the EVM005 open reading frame. Finally, ectromelia virus devoid of EVM005 was attenuated in both A/NCR and C57BL/6 mouse models, indicating that EVM005 is required for virulence and immune regulation in vivo.
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Co-administration of the broad-spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (CMX001), with smallpox vaccine does not compromise vaccine protection in mice challenged with ectromelia virus.
Antiviral Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2014
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Natural orthopoxvirus outbreaks such as vaccinia, cowpox, cattlepox and buffalopox continue to cause morbidity in the human population. Monkeypox virus remains a significant agent of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Furthermore, monkeypox virus's broad host-range and expanding environs make it of particular concern as an emerging human pathogen. Monkeypox virus and variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox) are both potential agents of bioterrorism. The first line response to orthopoxvirus disease is through vaccination with first-generation and second-generation vaccines, such as Dryvax and ACAM2000. Although these vaccines provide excellent protection, their widespread use is impeded by the high level of adverse events associated with vaccination using live, attenuated virus. It is possible that vaccines could be used in combination with antiviral drugs to reduce the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events, or as a preventive in individuals with uncertain exposure status or contraindication to vaccination. We have used the intranasal mousepox (ectromelia) model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination with Dryvax or ACAM2000 in conjunction with treatment using the broad spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001). We found that co-treatment with BCV reduced the severity of vaccination-associated lesion development. Although the immune response to vaccination was quantifiably attenuated, vaccination combined with BCV treatment did not alter the development of full protective immunity, even when administered two days following ectromelia challenge. Studies with a non-replicating vaccine, ACAM3000 (MVA), confirmed that BCV's mechanism of attenuating the immune response following vaccination with live virus was, as expected, by limiting viral replication and not through inhibition of the immune system. These studies suggest that, in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis, co-administration of BCV with vaccination should be considered a first response to a smallpox emergency in subjects of uncertain exposure status or as a means of reduction of the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events.
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Potent neutralization of vaccinia virus by divergent murine antibodies targeting a common site of vulnerability in L1 protein.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2014
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Vaccinia virus (VACV) L1 is an important target for viral neutralization and has been included in multicomponent DNA or protein vaccines against orthopoxviruses. To further understand the protective mechanism of the anti-L1 antibodies, we generated five murine anti-L1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), which clustered into 3 distinct epitope groups. While two groups of anti-L1 failed to neutralize, one group of 3 MAbs potently neutralized VACV in an isotype- and complement-independent manner. This is in contrast to neutralizing antibodies against major VACV envelope proteins, such as H3, D8, or A27, which failed to completely neutralize VACV unless the antibodies are of complement-fixing isotypes and complement is present. Compared to nonneutralizing anti-L1 MAbs, the neutralization antibodies bound to the recombinant L1 protein with a significantly higher affinity and also could bind to virions. By using a variety of techniques, including the isolation of neutralization escape mutants, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography, the epitope of the neutralizing antibodies was mapped to a conformational epitope with Asp35 as the key residue. This epitope is similar to the epitope of 7D11, a previously described potent VACV neutralizing antibody. The epitope was recognized mainly by CDR1 and CDR2 of the heavy chain, which are highly conserved among antibodies recognizing the epitope. These antibodies, however, had divergent light-chain and heavy-chain CDR3 sequences. Our study demonstrates that the conformational L1 epitope with Asp35 is a common site of vulnerability for potent neutralization by a divergent group of antibodies.
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Human core temperature prediction for heat-injury prevention.
IEEE J Biomed Health Inform
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2014
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Previously, our group developed auto-regressive (AR) models to predict human core temperature and help prevent hyperthermia (temperature > 39 oC). However, the models often yielded delayed predictions, limiting their application as a real-time warning system. To mitigate this problem, here we combined AR-model point estimates with statistically derived prediction intervals (PIs) and assessed the performance of three new alert algorithms [AR model plus PI, median filter of AR model plus PI decisions, and an adaptation of the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT)]. Using field-study data from 22 Soldiers, including five subjects who experienced hyperthermia, we assessed the alert algorithms for AR-model prediction windows from 15-30 min. Cross-validation simulations showed that, as the prediction windows increased, improvements in the algorithms' effective prediction horizons were offset by deteriorating accuracy, with a 20-min window providing a reasonable compromise. Model plus PI and SPRT yielded the largest effective prediction horizons (? 18 min), but these were offset by other performance measures. If high sensitivity and a long effective prediction horizon are desired, model plus PI provides the best choice, assuming decision switches can be tolerated. In contrast, if a small number of decision switches are desired, SPRT provides the best compromise as an early warning system of impending heat illnesses.
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Initial characterization of vaccinia virus B4 suggests a role in virus spread.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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Currently, little is known about the ankyrin/F-box protein B4. Here, we report that B4R-null viruses exhibited reduced plaque size in tissue culture, and decreased ability to spread, as assessed by multiple-step growth analysis. Electron microscopy indicated that B4R-null viruses still formed mature and extracellular virions; however, there was a slight decrease of virions released into the media following deletion of B4R. Deletion of B4R did not affect the ability of the virus to rearrange actin; however, VACV811, a large vaccinia virus deletion mutant missing 55 open reading frames, had decreased ability to produce actin tails. Using ectromelia virus, a natural mouse pathogen, we demonstrated that virus devoid of EVM154, the B4R homolog, showed decreased spread to organs and was attenuated during infection. This initial characterization suggests that B4 may play a role in virus spread, and that other unidentified mediators of actin tail formation may exist in vaccinia virus.
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Thermal-work strain during Marine rifle squad operations in Afghanistan.
Mil Med
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2013
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The physiological burden created by heat strain and physical exercise, also called thermal-work strain, was quantified for 10 male Marines (age 21.9 ± 2.3 years, height 180.3 ± 5.2 cm, and weight 85.2 ± 10.8 kg) during three dismounted missions in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Heart rate (HR) and core body temperature (T core) were recorded every 15 seconds (Equivital EQ-01; Hidalgo, Cambridge, United Kingdom) during periods of light, moderate, and heavy work and used to estimate metabolic rate. Meteorological measures, clothing characteristics, anthropometrics, and estimated metabolic rates were used to predict T core for the same missions during March (spring) and July (summer) conditions. Thermal-work strain was quantified from HR and T core values using the Physiological Strain Index (PSI) developed by Moran et al. July PSI and T core values were predicted and not observed due to lack of access to in-theater warfighters at that time. Our methods quantify and compare the predicted and observed thermal-work strain resulting from environment and worn or carried equipment and illustrate that a small increase in ambient temperature and solar load might result in increased thermal-work strain.
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Immunoproteasome Activation During Early Antiviral Response in Mouse Pancreatic ?-cells: New Insights into Auto-antigen Generation in Type I Diabetes?
J Clin Cell Immunol
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2013
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Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic ?-cells. The immunoproteasome, a version of the proteasome that collaborates with the 11S/PA28 activator to generate immunogenic peptides for presentation by MHC class I molecules, has long been implicated in the onset of the disease, but little is known about immunoproteasome function and regulation in pancreatic ?-cells. Interesting insight into these issues comes from a recent analysis of the immunoproteasome expressed in pancreatic ?-cells during early antiviral defenses mediated by interferon ? (IFN?), a type I IFN implicated in the induction of the diabetic state in human and animal models. Using mouse islets and the MIN6 insulinoma cell line, Freudenburg et al. found that IFN? stimulates expression of the immunoproteasome and the 11S/PA28 activator in a manner fundamentally similar to the classic immuno-inducer IFN?, with similar timing of mRNA accumulation and decline; similar transcriptional activation mediated primarily by the IRF1 and similar mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, neither IFN? nor IFN? altered the expression of regular proteolytic subunits or prevented their incorporation into proteolytic cores. As a result, immunoproteasomes had stochastic combinations of immune and regular proteolytic sites, an arrangement that would likely increase the probability with which unique immunogenic peptides are produced. However, immunoproteasomes were activated by the 11S/PA28 only under conditions of ATP depletion. A mechanism that prevents the activation of immunoproteasome at high ATP levels has not been reported before and could have a major regulatory significance, as it could suppress the generation of immunogenic peptides as cell accumulate immunoproteasome and 11S/PA28, and activate antigen processing only when ATP levels drop. We discuss implications of these new findings on the link between early antiviral response and the onset of type 1 diabetes.
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Skin temperature and heart rate can be used to estimate physiological strain during exercise in the heat in a cohort of fit and unfit males.
Mil Med
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2013
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To evaluate the previously developed physiological strain index (PSI) model using heart rate and skin temperature to provide further insight into the detection and estimation of thermal and physiological heat strain indices. A secondary aim was to characterize individuals who excel in their performance in the heat.
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Investigations of TB vaccine-induced mucosal protection in mice.
Microbes Infect.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2013
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A better understanding of mucosal immunity is required to develop more protective vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We developed a murine aerosol challenge model to investigate responses capable of protecting against mucosal infection. Mice received vaccinations intranasally with CpG-adjuvanted antigen 85B (Ag85B/CpG) and/or Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Protection against aerosol challenge with a recombinant GFP-expressing BCG was assessed. Mucosal prime/boost vaccinations with Ag85B/CpG and BCG were protective, but did not prevent lung infection indicating more efficacious mucosal vaccines are needed. Our novel finding that protection correlated with increased airway dendritic cells early post-challenge could help guide the development of enhanced mucosal vaccines.
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Estimation of human core temperature from sequential heart rate observations.
Physiol Meas
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2013
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Core temperature (CT) in combination with heart rate (HR) can be a good indicator of impending heat exhaustion for occupations involving exposure to heat, heavy workloads, and wearing protective clothing. However, continuously measuring CT in an ambulatory environment is difficult. To address this problem we developed a model to estimate the time course of CT using a series of HR measurements as a leading indicator using a Kalman filter. The model was trained using data from 17 volunteers engaged in a 24 h military field exercise (air temperatures 24-36 °C, and 42%-97% relative humidity and CTs ranging from 36.0-40.0 °C). Validation data from laboratory and field studies (N = 83) encompassing various combinations of temperature, hydration, clothing, and acclimation state were examined using the Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LoA) method. We found our model had an overall bias of -0.03 ± 0.32 °C and that 95% of all CT estimates fall within ±0.63 °C (>52 000 total observations). While the model for estimating CT is not a replacement for direct measurement of CT (literature comparisons of esophageal and rectal methods average LoAs of ±0.58 °C) our results suggest it is accurate enough to provide practical indication of thermal work strain for use in the work place.
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On the accuracy of instantaneous gas exchange rates, energy expenditure and respiratory quotient calculations obtained from indirect whole room calorimetry.
Physiol Meas
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2013
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This paper analyzes the accuracy of metabolic rate calculations performed in the whole room indirect calorimeter using the molar balance equations. The equations are treated from the point of view of cause-effect relationship where the gaseous exchange rates representing the unknown causes need to be inferred from a known, noisy effect-gaseous concentrations. Two methods of such inference are analyzed. The first method is based on the previously published regularized deconvolution of the molar balance equation and the second one, proposed in this paper, relies on regularized differentiation of gaseous concentrations. It is found that both methods produce similar results for the absolute values of metabolic variables and their accuracy. The uncertainty for O2 consumption rate is found to be 7% and for CO2 production--3.2%. The uncertainties in gaseous exchange rates do not depend on the absolute values of O2 consumption and CO2 production. In contrast, the absolute uncertainty in respiratory quotient is a function of the gaseous exchange rates and varies from 9.4% during the night to 2.3% during moderate exercise. The uncertainty in energy expenditure was found to be 5.9% and independent of the level of gaseous exchange. For both methods, closed form analytical formulas for confidence intervals are provided allowing quantification of uncertainty for four major metabolic variables in real world studies.
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A review of experimental and natural infections of animals with monkeypox virus between 1958 and 2012.
Future Virol
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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Monkeypox virus (MPXV) was discovered in 1958 during an outbreak in an animal facility in Copenhagen, Denmark. Since its discovery, MPXV has revealed a propensity to infect and induce disease in a large number of animals within the mammalia class from pan-geographical locations. This finding has impeded the elucidation of the natural host, although the strongest candidates are African squirrels and/or other rodents. Experimentally, MPXV can infect animals via a variety of multiple different inoculation routes; however, the natural route of transmission is unknown and is likely to be somewhat species specific. In this review we have attempted to compile and discuss all published articles that describe experimental or natural infections with MPXV, dating from the initial discovery of the virus through to the year 2012. We further discuss the comparative disease courses and pathologies of the host species.
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Relationship between core temperature, skin temperature, and heat flux during exercise in heat.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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This paper investigates the relationship between core temperature (T c), skin temperature (T s) and heat flux (HF) during exercise in hot conditions.
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RNA helicase signaling is critical for type i interferon production and protection against Rift Valley fever virus during mucosal challenge.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging RNA virus with devastating economic and social consequences. Clinically, RVFV induces a gamut of symptoms ranging from febrile illness to retinitis, hepatic necrosis, hemorrhagic fever, and death. It is known that type I interferon (IFN) responses can be protective against severe pathology; however, it is unknown which innate immune receptor pathways are crucial for mounting this response. Using both in vitro assays and in vivo mucosal mouse challenge, we demonstrate here that RNA helicases are critical for IFN production by immune cells and that signaling through the helicase adaptor molecule MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling) is protective against mortality and more subtle pathology during RVFV infection. In addition, we demonstrate that Toll-like-receptor-mediated signaling is not involved in IFN production, further emphasizing the importance of the RNA cellular helicases in type I IFN responses to RVFV.
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Reduction in ATP levels triggers immunoproteasome activation by the 11S (PA28) regulator during early antiviral response mediated by IFN? in mouse pancreatic ?-cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2013
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Autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic ?-cells is the hallmark of type I diabetes. One of the key molecules implicated in the disease onset is the immunoproteasome, a protease with multiple proteolytic sites that collaborates with the constitutive 19S and the inducible 11S (PA28) activators to produce immunogenic peptides for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Despite its importance, little is known about the function and regulation of the immunoproteasome in pancreatic ?-cells. Of special interest to immunoproteasome activation in ?-cells are the effects of IFN?, a type I IFN secreted by virus-infected cells and implicated in type I diabetes onset, compared to IFN?, the classic immunoproteasome inducer secreted by cells of the immune system. By qPCR analysis, we show that mouse insulinoma MIN6 cells and mouse islets accumulate the immune proteolytic ?1(i), ?2(i) and ?5(i), and 11S mRNAs upon exposure to IFN? or IFN?. Higher concentrations of IFN? than IFN? are needed for similar expression, but in each case the expression is transient, with maximal mRNA accumulation in 12 hours, and depends primarily on Interferon Regulatory Factor 1. IFNs do not alter expression of regular proteasome genes, and in the time frame of IFN?-mediated response, the immune and regular proteolytic subunits co-exist in the 20S particles. In cell extracts with ATP, these particles have normal peptidase activities and degrade polyubiquitinated proteins with rates typical of the regular proteasome, implicating normal regulation by the 19S activator. However, ATP depletion rapidly stimulates the catalytic rates in a manner consistent with levels of the 11S activator. These findings suggest that stochastic combination of regular and immune proteolytic subunits may increase the probability with which unique immunogenic peptides are produced in pancreatic ?-cells exposed to IFN?, but primarily in cells with reduced ATP levels that stimulate the 11S participation in immunoproteasome function.
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Use of a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing interferon gamma for post-exposure protection against vaccinia and ectromelia viruses.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Post-exposure vaccination with vaccinia virus (VACV) has been suggested to be effective in minimizing death if administered within four days of smallpox exposure. While there is anecdotal evidence for efficacy of post-exposure vaccination this has not been definitively studied in humans. In this study, we analyzed post-exposure prophylaxis using several attenuated recombinant VACV in a mouse model. A recombinant VACV expressing murine interferon gamma (IFN-?) was most effective for post-exposure protection of mice infected with VACV and ectromelia virus (ECTV). Untreated animals infected with VACV exhibited severe weight loss and morbidity leading to 100% mortality by 8 to 10 days post-infection. Animals treated one day post-infection had milder symptoms, decreased weight loss and morbidity, and 100% survival. Treatment on days 2 or 3 post-infection resulted in 40% and 20% survival, respectively. Similar results were seen in ECTV-infected mice. Despite the differences in survival rates in the VACV model, the viral load was similar in both treated and untreated mice while treated mice displayed a high level of IFN-? in the serum. These results suggest that protection provided by IFN-? expressed by VACV may be mediated by its immunoregulatory activities rather than its antiviral effects. These results highlight the importance of IFN-? as a modulator of the immune response for post-exposure prophylaxis and could be used potentially as another post-exposure prophylaxis tool to prevent morbidity following infection with smallpox and other orthopoxviruses.
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Human thermoregulatory system state estimation using non-invasive physiological sensors.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Small teams of emergency workers/military can often find themselves engaged in critical, high exertion work conducted under challenging environmental conditions. These types of conditions present thermal work strain challenges which unmitigated can lead to collapse (heat exhaustion) or even death from heat stroke. Physiological measurement of these teams provides a mechanism that could be an effective tool in preventing thermal injury. While indices of thermal work strain have been proposed they suffer from ignoring thermoregulatory context and rely on measuring internal temperature (IT). Measurement of IT in free ranging ambulatory environments is problematic. In this paper we propose a physiology based Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) model that estimates internal temperature, heat production and heat transfer from observations of heart rate, accelerometry, and skin heat flux. We learn the models conditional probability distributions from seven volunteers engaged in a 48 hour military field training exercise. We demonstrate that sum of our minute to minute heat production estimates correlate well with total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) measured using the doubly labeled water technique (r(2) = 0.73). We also demonstrate that the DBN is able to infer IT in new datasets to within ±0.5 °C over 85% of the time. Importantly, the additional thermoregulatory context allows critical high IT temperature to be estimated better than previous approaches. We conclude that the DBN approach shows promise in enabling practical real time thermal work strain monitoring applications from physiological monitoring systems that exist today.
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The ectromelia virus SPI-2 protein causes lethal mousepox by preventing NK cell responses.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2011
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Ectromelia virus (ECTV) is a natural pathogen of mice that causes mousepox, and many of its genes have been implicated in the modulation of host immune responses. Serine protease inhibitor 2 (SPI-2) is one of these putative ECTV host response modifier proteins. SPI-2 is conserved across orthopoxviruses, but results defining its mechanism of action and in vivo function are lacking or contradictory. We studied the role of SPI-2 in mousepox by deleting the SPI-2 gene or its serine protease inhibitor reactive site. We found that SPI-2 does not affect viral replication or cell-intrinsic apoptosis pathways, since mutant viruses replicate in vitro as efficiently as wild-type virus. However, in the absence of SPI-2 protein, ECTV is attenuated in mousepox-susceptible mice, resulting in lower viral loads in the liver, decreased spleen pathology, and substantially improved host survival. This attenuation correlates with more effective immune responses in the absence of SPI-2, including an earlier serum gamma interferon (IFN-?) response, raised serum interleukin 18 (IL-18), increased numbers of granzyme B(+) CD8(+) T cells, and, most notably, increased numbers and activation of NK cells. Both virus attenuation and the improved immune responses associated with SPI-2 deletion from ECTV are lost when mice are depleted of NK cells. Consequently, SPI-2 renders mousepox lethal in susceptible strains by preventing protective NK cell defenses.
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Ccr5 regulates inflammatory gene expression in response to encephalomyocarditis virus infection.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is capable of stimulating inflammatory gene expression by macrophages as a result of interactions between EMCV capsid proteins and cell surface receptors. In this study, biochemical and genetic approaches identified a role for Ccr5, a chemokine receptor, in transducing the signals of EMCV infection that result in the expression of inflammatory genes in macrophages. Antibody neutralization and gene knockout strategies were used to show that the presence of Ccr5 is required for EMCV-stimulated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) activation, and the subsequent expression of the inflammatory gene-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Ccr5 appears to participate in the early control of virus replication: EMCV mRNA accumulates to sevenfold higher levels in Ccr5-deficient mice when compared to wild-type controls. These findings support a regulatory role for Ccr5 in the antiviral response to EMCV in which this chemokine receptor participates in regulation of inflammatory gene expression in response to virus infection.
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Synthesis, metabolic stability and antiviral evaluation of various alkoxyalkyl esters of cidofovir and 9-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine.
Bioorg. Med. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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Alkoxyalkyl esters of cidofovir (CDV) are orally active agents which inhibit the replication of a variety of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses including variola, vaccinia, ectromelia, herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus and others. One of these compounds, hexadecyloxypropyl-CDV (HDP-CDV, CMX001) is in clinical development for prevention and treatment of poxvirus infection, vaccination complications, and for infections caused by cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, herpesviruses and other dsDNA viruses. This class of lipid analogs is potentially prone to undergo omega oxidation of the alkyl moiety which can lead to a short chain carboxylic acid lacking antiviral activity. To address this issue, we synthesized a series of alkoxyalkyl or alkyl glycerol esters of CDV and (S)-HPMPA having modifications in the structure of the alkyl residue. Antiviral activity was assessed in cells infected with vaccinia, cowpox or ectromelia viruses. Metabolic stability was determined in S9 membrane fractions from rat, guinea pig, monkey and human liver. All compounds had substantial antiviral activity in cells infected with vaccinia, cowpox or ectromelia. Metabolic stability was lowest in monkey liver S9 incubations where rapid disappearance of HDP-CDV and HDP-(S)-HPMPA was noted. Metabolic stability in monkey preparations increased substantially when a ?-1 methyl group (15-methyl-HDP-CDV) or a terminal cyclopropyl residue (14-cyclopropyl-tetradecyloxypropyl-CDV) was present in the alkyl chain. The most stable compound was 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycero-3-CDV (ODBG-CDV) which was not metabolized extensively by monkey liver S9. In rat, guinea pig or human liver S9 incubations, most of the modified antiviral compounds were considerably more stable.
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Poxvirus interleukin-4 expression overcomes inherent resistance and vaccine-induced immunity: pathogenesis, prophylaxis, and antiviral therapy.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2010
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In 2001, Jackson et al. reported that murine IL-4 expression by a recombinant ectromelia virus caused enhanced morbidity and lethality in resistant C57BL/6 mice as well as overcame protective immune memory responses. To achieve a more thorough understanding of this phenomenon and to assess a variety of countermeasures, we constructed a series of ECTV recombinants encoding murine IL-4 under the control of promoters of different strengths and temporal regulation. We showed that the ECTV-IL-4 recombinant expressing the highest level of IL-4 was uniformly lethal for C57BL/6 mice even when previously immunized. The lethality of the ECTV-IL-4 recombinants resulted from virus-expressed IL-4 signaling through the IL-4 receptor but was not due to IL-4 toxicity. A number of treatment approaches were evaluated against the most virulent IL-4 encoding virus. The most efficacious therapy was a combination of two antiviral drugs (CMX001(®) and ST-246(®)) that have different mechanisms of action.
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Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2010
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Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the hosts immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the hosts immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complements role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICEs regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICEs role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.
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Ectromelia virus infections of mice as a model to support the licensure of anti-orthopoxvirus therapeutics.
Viruses
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2010
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The absence of herd immunity to orthopoxviruses and the concern that variola or monkeypox viruses could be used for bioterroristic activities has stimulated the development of therapeutics and safer prophylactics. One major limitation in this process is the lack of accessible human orthopoxvirus infections for clinical efficacy trials; however, drug licensure can be based on orthopoxvirus animal challenge models as described in the "Animal Efficacy Rule". One such challenge model uses ectromelia virus, an orthopoxvirus, whose natural host is the mouse and is the etiological agent of mousepox. The genetic similarity of ectromelia virus to variola and monkeypox viruses, the common features of the resulting disease, and the convenience of the mouse as a laboratory animal underscores its utility in the study of orthopoxvirus pathogenesis and in the development of therapeutics and prophylactics. In this review we outline how mousepox has been used as a model for smallpox. We also discuss mousepox in the context of mouse strain, route of infection, infectious dose, disease progression, and recovery from infection.
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Sustained IL-4 exposure leads to a novel pathway for hemophagocytosis, inflammation, and tissue macrophage accumulation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
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Erythrophagocytosis and inflammation from activated macrophages occur in distinct clinical scenarios. The presence of CD8(+) T cells and interferon-? (IFN-?) production is required to induce disease in mouse models of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. We investigated the roles of a different class of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13, in the induction of inflammatory tissue macrophage accumulation and/or hemophagocytosis. We found that large amounts of IL-4, but not IL-13, delivered via an implanted mini-pump or IL-4/anti-IL-4 complexes, lead to substantial YM1(+) tissue macrophage accumulation, erythrophagocytosis within the liver, spleen, and bone marrow, decreased hemoglobin and platelet levels, and acute weight loss. This effect is not dependent on the presence of antibody or T cells, as treatment of Rag2(-/-) mice leads to similar disease, and IFN-? neutralization during IL-4 treatment had no effect. IL-4 treatment results in suppression of IL-12, elevation of serum IFN-?, IL-10, and the murine IL-8 homolog KC, but not IL-6, IL-1?, or tumor necrosis factor-?. Finally, mice transgenic for IL-4 production developed tissue macrophage accumulation, disruption of splenic architecture, bone marrow hypocellularity, and extramedullary hematopoiesis. These data describe a novel pathophysiologic pathway for erythrophagocytosis in the context of tissue macrophage accumulation and inflammation involving elevations in IL-4 and alternative macrophage activation.
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VennVax, a DNA-prime, peptide-boost multi-T-cell epitope poxvirus vaccine, induces protective immunity against vaccinia infection by T cell response alone.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2010
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The potential for smallpox to be disseminated in a bioterror attack has prompted development of new, safer smallpox vaccination strategies. We designed and evaluated immunogenicity and efficacy of a T-cell epitope vaccine based on conserved and antigenic vaccinia/variola sequences, identified using bioinformatics and immunological methods. Vaccination in HLA transgenic mice using a DNA-prime/peptide-boost strategy elicited significant T cell responses to multiple epitopes. No antibody response pre-challenge was observed, neither against whole vaccinia antigens nor vaccine epitope peptides. Remarkably, 100% of vaccinated mice survived lethal vaccinia challenge, demonstrating that protective immunity to vaccinia does not require B cell priming.
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Src family kinases participate in the regulation of encephalomyocarditis virus-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by macrophages.
J. Gen. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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Src family kinases (SFKs) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that have been implicated as regulators of the inflammatory response. In this study, the role of SFK activation in the inflammatory response of macrophages to encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection was examined. Virus infection of macrophages stimulates the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-1beta and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Inhibition of SFK attenuates EMCV-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E(2) production, iNOS expression and subsequent nitric oxide production, and IL-1beta expression. EMCV-induced COX-2 expression requires the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38. Consistent with these previous findings, inhibition of SFKs attenuated the phosphorylation of p38 in response to EMCV infection, suggesting that SFKs may act upstream of p38. These findings provide evidence that SFK activation plays an active role in the regulation of inflammatory gene expression by virus-infected macrophages.
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Multiple phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases regulate vaccinia virus morphogenesis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2010
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Poxvirus morphogenesis is a complex process that involves the successive wrapping of the virus in host cell membranes. We screened by plaque assay a focused library of kinase inhibitors for those that caused a reduction in viral growth and identified several compounds that selectively inhibit phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Previous studies demonstrated that PI3Ks mediate poxviral entry. Using growth curves and electron microscopy in conjunction with inhibitors, we show that that PI3Ks additionally regulate morphogenesis at two distinct steps: immature to mature virion (IMV) transition, and IMV envelopment to form intracellular enveloped virions (IEV). Cells derived from animals lacking the p85 regulatory subunit of Type I PI3Ks (p85alpha(-/-)beta(-/-)) presented phenotypes similar to those observed with PI3K inhibitors. In addition, VV appear to redundantly use PI3Ks, as PI3K inhibitors further reduce plaque size and number in p85alpha(-/-)beta(-/-) cells. Together, these data provide evidence for a novel regulatory mechanism for virion morphogenesis involving phosphatidylinositol dynamics and may represent a new therapeutic target to contain poxviruses.
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A real-time algorithm for predicting core temperature in humans.
IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2010
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In this paper, we present a real-time implementation of a previously developed offline algorithm for predicting core temperature in humans. The real-time algorithm uses a zero-phase Butterworth digital filter to smooth the data and an autoregressive (AR) model to predict core temperature. The performance of the algorithm is assessed in terms of its prediction accuracy, quantified by the root mean squared error (RMSE), and in terms of prediction uncertainty, quantified by statistically based prediction intervals (PIs). To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, we simulated real-time implementation using core-temperature data collected during two different field studies, involving ten different individuals. One of the studies includes a case of heat illness suffered by one of the participants. The results indicate that although the real-time predictions yielded RMSEs that are larger than those of the offline algorithm, the real-time algorithm does produce sufficiently accurate predictions for practically meaningful prediction horizons (approximately 20 min). The algorithm reached alert (39 degrees C) and alarm (39.5 degrees C) thresholds for the heat-ill individual but did not even attain the alert threshold for the other individuals, demonstrating the algorithms good sensitivity and specificity. The PIs reflected, in an intuitively expected manner, the uncertainty associated with real-time forecast as a function of prediction horizon and core-temperature variability. The results also corroborate the feasibility of "universal" AR models, where an offline-developed model based on one individuals data could be used to predict any other individual in real time. We conclude that the real-time implementation of the algorithm confirms the attributes observed in the offline version and, hence, could be considered as a warning tool for impending heat illnesses.
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2-O methylation of the viral mRNA cap evades host restriction by IFIT family members.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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Cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) of higher eukaryotes and many viral RNAs are methylated at the N-7 and 2-O positions of the 5 guanosine cap by specific nuclear and cytoplasmic methyltransferases (MTases), respectively. Whereas N-7 methylation is essential for RNA translation and stability, the function of 2-O methylation has remained uncertain since its discovery 35 years ago. Here we show that a West Nile virus (WNV) mutant (E218A) that lacks 2-O MTase activity was attenuated in wild-type primary cells and mice but was pathogenic in the absence of type I interferon (IFN) signalling. 2-O methylation of viral RNA did not affect IFN induction in WNV-infected fibroblasts but instead modulated the antiviral effects of IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT), which are interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) implicated in regulation of protein translation. Poxvirus and coronavirus mutants that lacked 2-O MTase activity similarly showed enhanced sensitivity to the antiviral actions of IFN and, specifically, IFIT proteins. Our results demonstrate that the 2-O methylation of the 5 cap of viral RNA functions to subvert innate host antiviral responses through escape of IFIT-mediated suppression, and suggest an evolutionary explanation for 2-O methylation of cellular mRNA: to distinguish self from non-self RNA. Differential methylation of cytoplasmic RNA probably serves as an example for pattern recognition and restriction of propagation of foreign viral RNA in host cells.
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A mouse model of lethal infection for evaluating prophylactics and therapeutics against Monkeypox virus.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2010
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Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is an orthopoxvirus closely related to variola, the etiological agent of smallpox. In humans, MPXV causes a disease similar to smallpox and is considered to be an emerging infectious disease. Moreover, the use of MPXV for bioterroristic/biowarfare activities is of significant concern. Available small animal models of human monkeypox have been restricted to mammals with poorly defined biologies that also have limited reagent availability. We have established a murine MPXV model utilizing the STAT1-deficient C57BL/6 mouse. Here we report that a relatively low-dose intranasal (IN) infection induces 100% mortality in the stat1(-)(/)(-) model by day 10 postinfection with high infectious titers in the livers, spleens, and lungs of moribund animals. Vaccination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) followed by a booster vaccination is sufficient to protect against an intranasal MPXV challenge and induces an immune response more robust than that of a single vaccination. Furthermore, antiviral treatment with CMX001 (HDP-cidofovir) and ST-246 protects when administered as a regimen initiated on the day of infection. Thus, the stat1(-)(/)(-) model provides a lethal murine platform for evaluating therapeutics and for investigating the immunological and pathological responses to MPXV infection.
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Mousepox in the C57BL/6 strain provides an improved model for evaluating anti-poxvirus therapies.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2009
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The intranasal lethal mousepox model employing the A/Ncr mouse strain is used to evaluate anti-orthopoxvirus therapies. These infections mimic large droplet transmission and result in 100% mortality within 7-10 days with as little as 1 PFU of ectromelia virus. Unlike the A/Ncr model, humans are less susceptible to lethal respiratory infections with variola virus and monkeypox virus as demonstrated by their lower mortality rates. In this study we show that a low dose intranasal infection of C57BL/6 mice results in 60-80% mortality and better models smallpox. Comparing CMX001 (HDP-cidofovir) efficacy in the A/Ncr strain and the C57BL/6 strain revealed that delayed treatment with CMX001 is more efficacious at preventing severe disease in the C57BL/6 strain. The increased efficacy of CMX001 in C57BL/6 over A/Ncr following an intranasal infection with ectromelia appears to be mediated by a stronger Th1 cell mediated response. Following footpad infection we show that the C57BL/6 strain has earlier and more robust transcriptional activity, Th1 cytokine secretions, antigen presenting activity and IFNgamma splenic CD8+ T cell responses as compared to the A/Ncr strain. As a result of the enhanced immune response in the C57BL/6 strain, non-lethal intradermal ectromelia infections can therapeutically protect up to 3 days following a homologous, lethal intranasal infection - much like how smallpox vaccination can protect humans for up to 4 days following intranasal variola infection.
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Antiviral evaluation of octadecyloxyethyl esters of (S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl nucleosides against herpesviruses and orthopoxviruses.
Antiviral Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2009
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Our previous studies showed that esterification of 9-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (HPMPA) or 1-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)-propyl]cytosine (HPMPC) with alkoxyalkyl groups such as hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) or octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) resulted in large increases in antiviral activity and oral bioavailability. The HDP and ODE esters of HPMPA were shown to be active in cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), while HPMPA itself was virtually inactive. To explore this approach in greater detail, we synthesized four new compounds in this series, the ODE esters of 9-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)-propyl]guanine (HPMPG), 1-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]thymine (HPMPT), 9-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-2,6-diaminopurine (HPMPDAP) and 9-(S)-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-2-amino-6-cyclopropylaminopurine (HPMP-cPrDAP) and evaluated their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and vaccinia, cowpox and ectromelia. Against HSV-1, subnanomolar EC(50) values were observed with ODE-HPMPA and ODE-HPMPC while ODE-HPMPG had intermediate antiviral activity with an EC(50) of 40 nM. In HFF cells infected with HCMV, the lowest EC(50) values were observed with ODE-HPMPC, 0.9 nM. ODE-HPMPA was highly active with an EC(50) of 3 nM, while ODE-HPMPG and ODE-HPMPDAP were also highly active with EC(50)s of 22 and 77 nM, respectively. Against vaccinia and cowpox viruses, ODE-HPMPG and ODE-HPMPDAP were the most active and selective compounds with EC(50) values of 20-60 nM and selectivity index values of 600-3500. ODE-HPMPG was also active against ectromelia virus with an EC(50) value of 410 nM and a selectivity index value of 166. ODE-HPMPG and ODE-HPMPDAP are proposed for further preclinical evaluation as possible candidates for treatment of HSV, HCMV or orthopoxvirus diseases.
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Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulates macrophage responses to double-stranded RNA and encephalomyocarditis virus.
J Innate Immun
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2009
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Virus infection of macrophages stimulates the expression of proinflammatory and antiviral genes interleukin-1 (IL-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In this study, we show that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for the inflammatory response of macrophages to virus infection. When macrophages are infected with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) there is a rapid and transient activation of PI3K and phosphorylation of its downstream target Akt. Inhibitors of PI3K attenuate EMCV- and double-stranded RNA-induced iNOS, COX-2 and IL-1 beta expression in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages. The attenuation of inflammatory gene expression in response to PI3K inhibition correlates with the induction of macrophage apoptosis. The morphology of macrophages shifts from activation in response to EMCV infection to apoptosis in the cells treated with PI3K inhibitors and EMCV. These morphological changes are accompanied by the activation of caspase-3. These findings suggest that PI3K plays a central role in the regulation of macrophage responses to EMCV infection. When PI3K is activated, it participates in the regulation of inflammatory gene expression; however, if PI3K is inhibited macrophages are unable to mount an inflammatory antiviral response and die by apoptosis.
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The new ACAM2000 vaccine and other therapies to control orthopoxvirus outbreaks and bioterror attacks.
Expert Rev Vaccines
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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Quarantine, case tracing and population vaccination facilitated the global eradication, in 1980, of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. The vaccines used during the eradication period, including Dryvax, the smallpox vaccine used in the USA, were live vaccinia and cowpoxvirus-based vaccines, which induced long-lasting and cross-protective immunity against variola and other related poxviruses. These vaccine viruses were produced by serial propagation in domesticated animals. The drawbacks to such serially propagated live viral vaccines include the level of postvaccination local and systemic reactions and contraindications to their use in immunocompromised individuals, individuals with certain skin and cardiac diseases, and pregnant women. In the latter stages of the population-based smallpox vaccination campaign, research began with ways to improve safety and modernizing the manufacture of vaccinia vaccines; however, with the eradication of variola this work stopped. Outbreaks of monkeypoxvirus in humans and the bioterrorist threat of monkeypox and variola virus renewed the need for improved vaccinia vaccines. ACAM2000 is one of the new generation of smallpox vaccines. It is produced in cell culture from a clonally purified master seed stock of vaccinia derived from the New York City Board of Health strain of vaccinia. The clonally purified master seed assures a more homogeneous vaccine without the inherent mutations associated with serial propagation and the cell culture limits adventitious and bacterial contamination in vaccine production. In preclinical and clinical trials, ACAM2000 demonstrated an immunogenicity and safety profile similar to that of Dryvax.
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Experimental infection of an African dormouse (Graphiurus kelleni) with monkeypox virus.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
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Suitable animal models are needed to study monkeypox virus (MPXV) as human monkeypox clinically resembles smallpox and MPXV is a zoonotic and potential bioterroristic agent. We have demonstrated that a species of African dormice, Graphiurus kelleni, is susceptible to a lethal infection of MPXV and that MPXV replicated in multiple organs of this species. Following intranasal administration, MPXV replicated locally in the nasal mucosa causing necrosis and hemorrhage with subsequent systemic spread to lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and other tissues where it caused severe necrosis and/or hemorrhage leading to death. The dormouse model was validated for testing prophylactic (Dryvax vaccine) and therapeutic (cidofovir) test articles against intranasal challenges with MPXV.
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Systemic treatment of xenografts with vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 reveals the immunologic facet of oncolytic therapy.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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GLV-1h68 is an attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV) that selectively colonizes established human xenografts inducing their complete regression.
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Real time gait pattern classification from chest worn accelerometry during a loaded road march.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
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Accelerometers, whether in smart phones or wearable physiological monitoring systems are becoming widely used to identify movement and activities of free living individuals. Although there has been much work in applying computationally intensive methods to this problem, this paper focuses on developing a real-time gait analysis approach that is intuitive, requires no individual calibration, can be extended to complex gait analysis, and can readily be adopted by ambulatory physiological monitors for use in real time. Chest-mounted tri-axial accelerometry data were collected from sixty-one male U.S. Army Ranger candidates engaged in an 8 or 12 mile loaded (35 Kg packs) timed road march. The pace of the road march was such that volunteers needed to both walk and run. To provide intuitive features we examined the periodic patterns generated from 4s periods of movement from the vertical and longitudinal accelerometer axes. Applying the "eigenfaces" face recognition approach we used Principal Components Analysis to find a single basis vector from 10% of the data (n=6) that could distinguish patterns of walk and run with a classification rate of 95% and 90% (n=55) respectively. Because these movement features are based on a gridded frequency count, the method is applicable for use by body-worn microprocessors.
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Soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation for protection against inhalable allergens, ultrafine particles, and microbial infections.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
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Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 ?m with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems.
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Mousepox, a small animal model of smallpox.
Methods Mol. Biol.
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Ectromelia virus infections in the laboratory mouse have emerged as a valuable model to investigate human orthopoxvirus infections to understand the progression of disease, to discover and characterize antiviral treatments, and to study the host-pathogen relationship as it relates to pathogenesis and the immune response. Here we describe how to safely work with the virus and protocols for common procedures for the study of ectromelia virus in the laboratory mouse including the preparation of virus stocks, the use of various routes of inoculation, and collection of blood and tissue from infected animals. In addition, several procedures are described for assessing the host response to infection: for example, measurement of virus-specific CD8 T cells and the use of ELISA and neutralization assays to measure orthopoxvirus-specific antibody titers.
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Applications of real-time thermoregulatory models to occupational heat stress: validation with military and civilian field studies.
J Strength Cond Res
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A real-time thermoregulatory model using noninvasive measurements as inputs was developed for predicting physiological responses of individuals working long hours. The purpose of the model is to reduce heat-related injuries and illness by predicting the physiological effects of thermal stress on individuals while working. The model was originally validated mainly by using data from controlled laboratory studies. This study expands the validation of the model with field data from 26 test volunteers, including US Marines, Australian soldiers, and US wildland fire fighters (WLFF). These data encompass a range of environmental conditions (air temperature: 19-30° C; relative humidity: 25-63%) and clothing (i.e., battle dress uniform, chemical-biological protective garment, WLFF protective gear), while performing diverse activities (e.g., marksmanship, marching, extinguishing fires, and digging). The predicted core temperatures (Tc), calculated using environmental, anthropometric, clothing, and heart rate measures collected in the field as model inputs, were compared with subjects Tc collected with ingested telemetry temperature pills. Root mean standard deviation (RMSD) values, used for goodness of fit comparisons, indicated that overall, the model predictions were in close agreement with the measured values (grand mean of RMSD: 0.15-0.38° C). Although the field data showed more individual variability in the physiological data relative to more controlled laboratory studies, this study showed that the performance of the model was adequate.
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Hydration assessment using the cardiovascular response to standing.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
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The cardiovascular response to standing (sit-to-stand change in heart rate; SS?HR) is commonly employed as a screening tool to detect hypohydration (body water deficit). No study has systematically evaluated SS?HR cut points using different magnitudes or different types of controlled hypohydration. The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the often proposed 20 b/min SS?HR cut point using both hypertonic and isotonic models of hypohydration. Thirteen healthy young adults (8M, 5F) underwent three bouts of controlled hypohydration. The first bout used sweating to elicit large losses of body water (mass) (>3 % sweat). The second two bouts were matched to elicit 3 % body mass losses (3 % diuretic; 3 % sweat). A euhydration control trial (EUH) was paired with each hypohydration trial for a total of six trials. Heart rate was assessed after 3-min sitting and after 1-min standing during all trials. SS?HR was compared among trials, and receiver operator characteristic curve analysis was used to determine diagnostic accuracy of the 20 b/min SS?HR cut point. Volunteers lost 4.5 ± 1.1, 3.0 ± 0.6, and 3.2 ± 0.6 % body mass during >3 % sweat, 3 % diuretic, and 3 % sweat trials, respectively. SS?HR (b/min) was 9 ± 8 (EUH), 20 ± 12 (>3 % sweat; P < 0.05 vs. EUH), 17 ± 7 (3 % diuretic; P < 0.05 vs. EUH), and 13 ± 11 (3 % sweat). The 20 beats/min cut point had high specificity (90 %) but low sensitivity (44 %) and overall diagnostic accuracy of 67 %. SS?HR increased significantly in response to severe hypertonic hypohydration and moderate isotonic hypohydration, but not moderate hypertonic hypohydration. However, the 20 beats/min cut point afforded only marginal diagnostic accuracy.
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Evaluation of disease and viral biomarkers as triggers for therapeutic intervention in respiratory mousepox - an animal model of smallpox.
Antiviral Res.
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The human population is currently faced with the potential use of natural or recombinant variola and monkeypox viruses as biological weapons. Furthermore, the emergence of human monkeypox in Africa and its expanding environs poses a significant natural threat. Such occurrences would require therapeutic and prophylactic intervention with antivirals to minimize morbidity and mortality of exposed populations. Two orally-bioavailable antivirals are currently in clinical trials; namely CMX001, an ether-lipid analog of cidofovir with activity at the DNA replication stage and ST-246, a novel viral egress inhibitor. Both of these drugs have previously been evaluated in the ectromelia/mousepox system; however, the trigger for intervention was not linked to a disease biomarker or a specific marker of virus replication. In this study we used lethal, intranasal, ectromelia virus infections of C57BL/6 and hairless SKH1 mice to model human disease and evaluate exanthematous rash (rash) as an indicator to initiate antiviral treatment. We show that significant protection can be provided to C57BL/6 mice by CMX001 or ST-246 when therapy is initiated on day 6 post infection or earlier. We also show that significant protection can be provided to SKH1 mice treated with CMX001 at day 3 post infection or earlier, but this is four or more days before detection of rash (ST-246 not tested). Although in this model rash could not be used as a treatment trigger, viral DNA was detected in blood by day 4 post infection and in the oropharyngeal secretions (saliva) by day 2-3 post infection - thus providing robust and specific markers of virus replication for therapy initiation. These findings are discussed in the context of current respiratory challenge animal models in use for the evaluation of poxvirus antivirals.
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Expression of a non-coding RNA in ectromelia virus is required for normal plaque formation.
Virus Genes
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Poxviruses are dsDNA viruses with large genomes. Many genes in the genome remain uncharacterized, and recent studies have demonstrated that the poxvirus transcriptome includes numerous so-called anomalous transcripts not associated with open reading frames. Here, we characterize the expression and role of an apparently non-coding RNA in orthopoxviruses, which we call viral hairpin RNA (vhRNA). Using a bioinformatics approach, we predicted expression of a transcript not associated with an open reading frame that is likely to form a stem-loop structure due to the presence of a 21 nt palindromic sequence. Expression of the transcript as early as 2 h post-infection was confirmed by northern blot and analysis of publicly available vaccinia virus infected cell transcriptomes. The transcription start site was determined by RACE PCE and transcriptome analysis, and early and late promoter sequences were identified. Finally, to test the function of the transcript we generated an ectromelia virus knockout, which failed to form plaques in cell culture. The important role of the transcript in viral replication was further demonstrated using siRNA. Although the function of the transcript remains unknown, our work contributes to evidence of an increasingly complex poxvirus transcriptome, suggesting that transcripts such as vhRNA not associated with an annotated open reading frame can play an important role in viral replication.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.