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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Association Between Atrial Fibrillation and Silent Cerebral Infarctions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
Ann. Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2014
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Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cause of stroke. Silent cerebral infarctions (SCIs) are known to occur in the presence and absence of AF, but the association between these disorders has not been well-defined.
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High Throughput Tools to Access Images from Clinical Archives for Research.
J Digit Imaging
PUBLISHED: 10-16-2014
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Historically, medical images collected in the course of clinical care have been difficult to access for secondary research studies. While there is a tremendous potential value in the large volume of studies contained in clinical image archives, Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are designed to optimize clinical operations and workflow. Search capabilities in PACS are basic, limiting their use for population studies, and duplication of archives for research is costly. To address this need, we augment the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) open source software, providing investigators with the tools necessary to query and integrate medical record and clinical research data. Over 100 healthcare institutions have installed this suite of software tools that allows investigators to search medical record metadata including images for specific types of patients. In this report, we describe a new Medical Imaging Informatics Bench to Bedside (mi2b2) module ( www.mi2b2.org ), available now as an open source addition to the i2b2 software platform that allows medical imaging examinations collected during routine clinical care to be made available to translational investigators directly from their institution's clinical PACS for research and educational use in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Omnibus Rule. Access governance within the mi2b2 module is customizable per institution and PACS minimizing impact on clinical systems. Currently in active use at our institutions, this new technology has already been used to facilitate access to thousands of clinical MRI brain studies representing specific patient phenotypes for use in research.
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Simultaneous fMRI-PET of the opioidergic pain system in human brain.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2014
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MRI and PET provide complementary information for studying brain function. While the potential use of simultaneous MRI/PET for clinical diagnostic and disease staging has been demonstrated recently; the biological relevance of concurrent functional MRI-PET brain imaging to dissect neurochemically distinct components of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal has not yet been shown. We obtained sixteen fMRI-PET data sets from eight healthy volunteers. Each subject participated in randomized order in a pain scan and a control (nonpainful pressure) scan on the same day. Dynamic PET data were acquired with an opioid radioligand, [(11)C]diprenorphine, to detect endogenous opioid releases in response to pain. BOLD fMRI data were collected at the same time to capture hemodynamic responses. In this simultaneous human fMRI-PET imaging study, we show co-localized responses in thalamus and striatum related to pain processing, while modality specific brain networks were also found. Co-localized fMRI and PET signal changes in the thalamus were positively correlated suggesting that pain-induced changes in opioid neurotransmission contribute a significant component of the fMRI signal change in this region. Simultaneous fMRI-PET provides unique opportunities allowing us to relate specific neurochemical events to functional hemodynamic activation and to investigate the impacts of neurotransmission on neurovascular coupling of the human brain in vivo.
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Expectancy and Conditioning in Placebo Analgesia: Separate or Connected Processes?
Psychol Conscious (Am Psychol Assoc)
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2014
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Expectancy and conditioning are often tested as opposing explanations of placebo analgesia, most commonly by pitting the effects of a conditioning procedure against those of a verbally-induced expectation for pain reduction. However, conditioning procedures can also alter expectations, such that the effect of conditioning on pain might be mediated by expectancy. We assessed the effect of conditioning on expected pain and placebo-induced pain reduction. Participants were told that the treatment (real or sham acupuncture) would affect one side of the arm but not the other. Because a real acupuncture effect would not be specific to a randomly selected side of the arm, any difference in pain between the "treated" and the "untreated" side would be a placebo effect. There were no significant main effects or interactions associated with type of acupuncture (real versus sham). In both groups, conditioning decreased expected pain for "treated" location and also increased the placebo effect (i.e., the difference in pain report between "treated" and "untreated" locations). In addition, mediation analysis lent support to the hypothesis that the effects of conditioning on placebo analgesia may be mediated by expectancy, although the size of this indirect effect requires further study.
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MB-COMT promoter DNA methylation is associated with working-memory processing in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls.
Epigenetics
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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Many genetic studies report mixed results both for the associations between COMT polymorphisms and schizophrenia and for the effects of COMT variants on common intermediate phenotypes of the disorder. Reasons for this may include small genetic effect sizes and the modulation of environmental influences. To improve our understanding of the role of COMT in the disease etiology, we investigated the effect of DNA methylation in the MB-COMT promoter on neural activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during working memory processing as measured by fMRI - an intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. Imaging and epigenetic data were measured in 102 healthy controls and 82 schizophrenia patients of the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium (MCIC) study of schizophrenia. Neural activity during the Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm was acquired with either a 3T Siemens Trio or 1.5T Siemens Sonata and analyzed using the FMRIB Software Library (FSL). DNA methylation measurements were derived from cryo-conserved blood samples. We found a positive association between MB-COMT promoter methylation and neural activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in a model using a region-of-interest approach and could confirm this finding in a whole-brain model. This effect was independent of disease status. Analyzing the effect of MB-COMT promoter DNA methylation on a neuroimaging phenotype can provide further evidence for the importance of COMT and epigenetic risk mechanisms in schizophrenia. The latter may represent trans-regulatory or environmental risk factors that can be measured using brain-based intermediate phenotypes.
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Functional network architecture predicts psychologically mediated analgesia related to treatment in chronic knee pain patients.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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Placebo analgesia is an indicator of how efficiently the brain translates psychological signals conveyed by a treatment procedure into pain relief. It has been demonstrated that functional connectivity between distributed brain regions predicts placebo analgesia in chronic back pain patients. Greater network efficiency in baseline brain networks may allow better information transfer and facilitate adaptive physiological responses to psychological aspects of treatment. Here, we theorized that topological network alignments in resting state scans predict psychologically conditioned analgesic responses to acupuncture treatment in chronic knee osteoarthritis pain patients (n = 45). Analgesia was induced by building positive expectations toward acupuncture treatment with verbal suggestion and heat pain conditioning on a test site of the arm. This procedure induced significantly more analgesia after sham or real acupuncture on the test site than in a control site. The psychologically conditioned analgesia was invariant to sham versus real treatment. Efficiency of information transfer within local networks calculated with graph-theoretic measures (local efficiency and clustering coefficients) significantly predicted conditioned analgesia. Clustering coefficients in regions associated with memory, motivation, and pain modulation were closely involved in predicting analgesia. Moreover, women showed higher clustering coefficients and marginally greater pain reduction than men. Overall, analgesic response to placebo cues can be predicted from a priori resting state data by observing local network topology. Such low-cost synchronizations may represent preparatory resources that facilitate subsequent performance of brain circuits in responding to adaptive environmental cues. This suggests a potential utility of network measures in predicting placebo response for clinical use.
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Placebo analgesia and reward processing: integrating genetics, personality, and intrinsic brain activity.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2014
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Our expectations about an event can strongly shape our subjective evaluation and actual experience of events. This ability, applied to the modulation of pain, has the potential to affect therapeutic analgesia substantially and constitutes a foundation for non-pharmacological pain relief. A typical example of such modulation is the placebo effect. Studies indicate that placebo may be regarded as a reward, and brain activity in the reward system is involved in this modulation process. In the present study, we combined resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) measures, genotype at a functional COMT polymorphism (Val158Met), and personality measures in a model to predict the magnitude of placebo conditioning effect indicated by subjective pain rating reduction to calibrated noxious stimuli. We found that the regional homogeneity (ReHo), an index of local neural coherence, in the ventral striatum, was significantly associated with conditioning effects on pain rating changes. We also found that the number of Met alleles at the COMT polymorphism was linearly correlated to the suppression of pain. In a fitted regression model, we found the ReHo in the ventral striatum, COMT genotype, and Openness scores accounted for 59% of the variance in the change in pain ratings. The model was further tested using a separate data set from the same study. Our findings demonstrate the potential of combining resting-state connectivity, genetic information, and personality to predict placebo effect.
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Complexin2 modulates working memory-related neural activity in patients with schizophrenia.
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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The specific contribution of risk or candidate gene variants to the complex phenotype of schizophrenia is largely unknown. Studying the effects of such variants on brain function can provide insight into disease-associated mechanisms on a neural systems level. Previous studies found common variants in the complexin2 (CPLX2) gene to be highly associated with cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia patients. Similarly, cognitive functioning was found to be impaired in Cplx2 gene-deficient mice if they were subjected to maternal deprivation or mild brain trauma during puberty. Here, we aimed to study seven common CPLX2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their neurogenetic risk mechanisms by investigating their relationship to a schizophrenia-related functional neuroimaging intermediate phenotype. We examined functional MRI and genotype data collected from 104 patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed schizophrenia and 122 healthy controls who participated in the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study of schizophrenia. Seven SNPs distributed over the whole CPLX2 gene were tested for association with working memory-elicited neural activity in a frontoparietal neural network. Three CPLX2 SNPs were significantly associated with increased neural activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus in the schizophrenia sample, but showed no association in healthy controls. Since increased working memory-related neural activity in individuals with or at risk for schizophrenia has been interpreted as 'neural inefficiency,' these findings suggest that certain variants of CPLX2 may contribute to impaired brain function in schizophrenia, possibly combined with other deleterious genetic variants, adverse environmental events, or developmental insults.
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Disrupted brain circuitry for pain-related reward/punishment in fibromyalgia.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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While patients with fibromyalgia (FM) are known to exhibit hyperalgesia, the central mechanisms contributing to this altered pain processing are not fully understood. This study was undertaken to investigate potential dysregulation of the neural circuitry underlying cognitive and hedonic aspects of the subjective experience of pain, such as anticipation of pain and anticipation of pain relief.
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The c.429_452 duplication of the ARX gene: a unique developmental-model of limb kinetic apraxia.
Orphanet J Rare Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2014
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The c.429_452dup24 of the ARX gene is a rare genetic anomaly, leading to X-Linked Intellectual Disability without brain malformation. While in certain cases c.429_452dup24 has been associated with specific clinical patterns such as Partington syndrome, the consequence of this mutation has been also often classified as "non-specific Intellectual Disability". The present work aims at a more precise description of the clinical features linked to the c.429_452dup24 mutation.
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The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data.
Paul M Thompson, Jason L Stein, Sarah E Medland, Derrek P Hibar, Alejandro Arias Vasquez, Miguel E Rentería, Roberto Toro, Neda Jahanshad, Gunter Schumann, Barbara Franke, Margaret J Wright, Nicholas G Martin, Ingrid Agartz, Martin Alda, Saud Alhusaini, Laura Almasy, Jorge Almeida, Kathryn Alpert, Nancy C Andreasen, Ole A Andreassen, Liana G Apostolova, Katja Appel, Nicola J Armstrong, Benjamin Aribisala, Mark E Bastin, Michael Bauer, Carrie E Bearden, Orjan Bergmann, Elisabeth B Binder, John Blangero, Henry J Bockholt, Erlend Bøen, Catherine Bois, Dorret I Boomsma, Tom Booth, Ian J Bowman, Janita Bralten, Rachel M Brouwer, Han G Brunner, David G Brohawn, Randy L Buckner, Jan Buitelaar, Kazima Bulayeva, Juan R Bustillo, Vince D Calhoun, Dara M Cannon, Rita M Cantor, Melanie A Carless, Xavier Caseras, Gianpiero L Cavalleri, M Mallar Chakravarty, Kiki D Chang, Christopher R K Ching, Andrea Christoforou, Sven Cichon, Vincent P Clark, Patricia Conrod, Giovanni Coppola, Benedicto Crespo-Facorro, Joanne E Curran, Michael Czisch, Ian J Deary, Eco J C de Geus, Anouk den Braber, Giuseppe Delvecchio, Chantal Depondt, Lieuwe de Haan, Greig I de Zubicaray, Danai Dima, Rali Dimitrova, Srdjan Djurovic, Hongwei Dong, Gary Donohoe, Ravindranath Duggirala, Thomas D Dyer, Stefan Ehrlich, Carl Johan Ekman, Torbjørn Elvsåshagen, Louise Emsell, Susanne Erk, Thomas Espeseth, Jesen Fagerness, Scott Fears, Iryna Fedko, Guillén Fernández, Simon E Fisher, Tatiana Foroud, Peter T Fox, Clyde Francks, Sophia Frangou, Eva Maria Frey, Thomas Frodl, Vincent Frouin, Hugh Garavan, Sudheer Giddaluru, David C Glahn, Beata Godlewska, Rita Z Goldstein, Randy L Gollub, Hans J Grabe, Oliver Grimm, Oliver Gruber, Tulio Guadalupe, Raquel E Gur, Ruben C Gur, Harald H H Göring, Saskia Hagenaars, Tomáš Hájek, Geoffrey B Hall, Jeremy Hall, John Hardy, Catharina A Hartman, Johanna Hass, Sean N Hatton, Unn K Haukvik, Katrin Hegenscheid, Andreas Heinz, Ian B Hickie, Beng-Choon Ho, David Hoehn, Pieter J Hoekstra, Marisa Hollinshead, Avram J Holmes, Georg Homuth, Martine Hoogman, L Elliot Hong, Norbert Hosten, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Hilleke E Hulshoff Pol, Kristy S Hwang, Clifford R Jack, Mark Jenkinson, Caroline Johnston, Erik G Jönsson, René S Kahn, Dalia Kasperaviciute, Sinead Kelly, Sungeun Kim, Peter Kochunov, Laura Koenders, Bernd Krämer, John B J Kwok, Jim Lagopoulos, Gonzalo Laje, Mikael Landén, Bennett A Landman, John Lauriello, Stephen M Lawrie, Phil H Lee, Stephanie Le Hellard, Herve Lemaitre, Cassandra D Leonardo, Chiang-Shan Li, Benny Liberg, David C Liewald, Xinmin Liu, Lorna M Lopez, Eva Loth, Anbarasu Lourdusamy, Michelle Luciano, Fabio Macciardi, Marise W J Machielsen, Glenda M Macqueen, Ulrik F Malt, René Mandl, Dara S Manoach, Jean-Luc Martinot, Mar Matarin, Karen A Mather, Manuel Mattheisen, Morten Mattingsdal, Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, Colm McDonald, Andrew M McIntosh, Francis J McMahon, Katie L McMahon, Eva Meisenzahl, Ingrid Melle, Yuri Milaneschi, Sebastian Mohnke, Grant W Montgomery, Derek W Morris, Eric K Moses, Bryon A Mueller, Susana Muñoz Maniega, Thomas W Mühleisen, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Benson Mwangi, Matthias Nauck, Kwangsik Nho, Thomas E Nichols, Lars-Göran Nilsson, Allison C Nugent, Lars Nyberg, Rene L Olvera, Jaap Oosterlaan, Roel A Ophoff, Massimo Pandolfo, Melina Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Martina Papmeyer, Tomas Paus, Zdenka Pausova, Godfrey D Pearlson, Brenda W Penninx, Charles P Peterson, Andrea Pfennig, Mary Phillips, G Bruce Pike, Jean-Baptiste Poline, Steven G Potkin, Benno Pütz, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, Jerod Rasmussen, Marcella Rietschel, Mark Rijpkema, Shannon L Risacher, Joshua L Roffman, Roberto Roiz-Santiañez, Nina Romanczuk-Seiferth, Emma J Rose, Natalie A Royle, Dan Rujescu, Mina Ryten, Perminder S Sachdev, Alireza Salami, Theodore D Satterthwaite, Jonathan Savitz, Andrew J Saykin, Cathy Scanlon, Lianne Schmaal, Hugo G Schnack, Andrew J Schork, S Charles Schulz, Remmelt Schür, Larry Seidman, Li Shen, Jody M Shoemaker, Andrew Simmons, Sanjay M Sisodiya, Colin Smith, Jordan W Smoller, Jair C Soares, Scott R Sponheim, Emma Sprooten, John M Starr, Vidar M Steen, Stephen Strakowski, Lachlan Strike, Jessika Sussmann, Philipp G Sämann, Alexander Teumer, Arthur W Toga, Diana Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Daniah Trabzuni, Sarah Trost, Jessica Turner, Martijn van den Heuvel, Nic J van der Wee, Kristel van Eijk, Theo G M van Erp, Neeltje E M van Haren, Dennis van 't Ent, Marie-José van Tol, Maria C Valdés Hernández, Dick J Veltman, Amelia Versace, Henry Völzke, Robert Walker, Henrik Walter, Lei Wang, Joanna M Wardlaw, Michael E Weale, Michael W Weiner, Wei Wen, Lars T Westlye, Heather C Whalley, Christopher D Whelan, Tonya White, Anderson M Winkler, Katharina Wittfeld, Girma Woldehawariat, Christiane Wolf, David Zilles, Marcel P Zwiers, Anbupalam Thalamuthu, Peter R Schofield, Nelson B Freimer, Natalia S Lawrence, Wayne Drevets, .
Brain Imaging Behav
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of findings, in a total of 24,997 subjects. By meta-analyzing results from many sites, ENIGMA has detected factors that affect the brain that no individual site could detect on its own, and that require larger numbers of subjects than any individual neuroimaging study has currently collected. ENIGMA's first project was a genome-wide association study identifying common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume or intracranial volume. Continuing work is exploring genetic associations with subcortical volumes (ENIGMA2) and white matter microstructure (ENIGMA-DTI). Working groups also focus on understanding how schizophrenia, bipolar illness, major depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affect the brain. We review the current progress of the ENIGMA Consortium, along with challenges and unexpected discoveries made on the way.
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Disrupted functional connectivity of the periaqueductal gray in chronic low back pain.
Neuroimage Clin
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Chronic low back pain is a common neurological disorder. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a key role in the descending modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated brain resting state PAG functional connectivity (FC) differences between patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) in low pain or high pain condition and matched healthy controls (HCs). PAG seed based functional connectivity (FC) analysis of the functional MR imaging data was performed to investigate the difference among the connectivity maps in the cLBP in the low or high pain condition and HC groups as well as within the cLBP at differing endogenous back pain intensities. Results showed that FC between the PAG and the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)/rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) increased in cLBP patients compared to matched controls. In addition, we also found significant negative correlations between pain ratings and PAG-vmPFC/rACC FC in cLBP patients after pain-inducing maneuver. The duration of cLBP was negatively correlated with PAG-insula and PAG-amygdala FC before pain-inducing maneuver in the patient group. These findings are in line with the impairments of the descending pain modulation reported in patients with cLBP. Our results provide evidence showing that cLBP patients have abnormal FC in PAG centered pain modulation network during rest.
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Patterns of brain activation when mothers view their own child and dog: an FMRI study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Neural substrates underlying the human-pet relationship are largely unknown. We examined fMRI brain activation patterns as mothers viewed images of their own child and dog and an unfamiliar child and dog. There was a common network of brain regions involved in emotion, reward, affiliation, visual processing and social cognition when mothers viewed images of both their child and dog. Viewing images of their child resulted in brain activity in the midbrain (ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra involved in reward/affiliation), while a more posterior cortical brain activation pattern involving fusiform gyrus (visual processing of faces and social cognition) characterized a mother's response to her dog. Mothers also rated images of their child and dog as eliciting similar levels of excitement (arousal) and pleasantness (valence), although the difference in the own vs. unfamiliar child comparison was larger than the own vs. unfamiliar dog comparison for arousal. Valence ratings of their dog were also positively correlated with ratings of the attachment to their dog. Although there are similarities in the perceived emotional experience and brain function associated with the mother-child and mother-dog bond, there are also key differences that may reflect variance in the evolutionary course and function of these relationships.
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Well-loved music robustly relieves pain: a randomized, controlled trial.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Music has pain-relieving effects, but its mechanisms remain unclear. We sought to verify previously studied analgesic components and further elucidate the underpinnings of music analgesia. Using a well-characterized conditioning-enhanced placebo model, we examined whether boosting expectations would enhance or interfere with analgesia from strongly preferred music. A two-session experiment was performed with 48 healthy, pain experiment-naïve participants. In a first cohort, 36 were randomized into 3 treatment groups, including music enhanced with positive expectancy, non-musical sound enhanced with positive expectancy, and no expectancy enhancement. A separate replication cohort of 12 participants received only expectancy-enhanced music following the main experiment to verify the results of expectancy-manipulation on music. Primary outcome measures included the change in subjective pain ratings to calibrated experimental noxious heat stimuli, as well as changes in treatment expectations. Without conditioning, expectations were strongly in favor of music compared to non-musical sound. While measured expectations were enhanced by conditioning, this failed to affect either music or sound analgesia significantly. Strongly preferred music on its own was as pain relieving as conditioning-enhanced strongly preferred music, and more analgesic than enhanced sound. Our results demonstrate the pain-relieving power of personal music even over enhanced expectations.
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Probabilistic atlas-based segmentation of combined T1-weighted and DUTE MRI for calculation of head attenuation maps in integrated PET/MRI scanners.
Am J Nucl Med Mol Imaging
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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We present a new MRI-based attenuation correction (AC) approach for integrated PET/MRI systems that combines both segmentation- and atlas-based methods by incorporating dual-echo ultra-short echo-time (DUTE) and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and a probabilistic atlas. Segmented atlases were constructed from CT training data using a leave-one-out framework and combined with T1w, DUTE, and CT data to train a classifier that computes the probability of air/soft tissue/bone at each voxel. This classifier was applied to segment the MRI of the subject of interest and attenuation maps (?-maps) were generated by assigning specific linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) to each tissue class. The ?-maps generated with this "Atlas-T1w-DUTE" approach were compared to those obtained from DUTE data using a previously proposed method. For validation of the segmentation results, segmented CT ?-maps were considered to the "silver standard"; the segmentation accuracy was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively through calculation of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Relative change (RC) maps between the CT and MRI-based attenuation corrected PET volumes were also calculated for a global voxel-wise assessment of the reconstruction results. The ?-maps obtained using the Atlas-T1w-DUTE classifier agreed well with those derived from CT; the mean DSCs for the Atlas-T1w-DUTE-based ?-maps across all subjects were higher than those for DUTE-based ?-maps; the atlas-based ?-maps also showed a lower percentage of misclassified voxels across all subjects. RC maps from the atlas-based technique also demonstrated improvement in the PET data compared to the DUTE method, both globally as well as regionally.
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Prefrontal Inefficiency Is Associated With Polygenic Risk for Schizophrenia.
Schizophr Bull
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2013
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Considering the diverse clinical presentation and likely polygenic etiology of schizophrenia, this investigation examined the effect of polygenic risk on a well-established intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. We hypothesized that a measure of cumulative genetic risk based on additive effects of many genetic susceptibility loci for schizophrenia would predict prefrontal cortical inefficiency during working memory, a brain-based biomarker for the disorder. The present study combined imaging, genetic and behavioral data obtained by the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study of schizophrenia (n = 255). For each participant, we derived a polygenic risk score (PGRS), which was based on over 600 nominally significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, associated with schizophrenia in a separate discovery sample comprising 3322 schizophrenia patients and 3587 control participants. Increased polygenic risk for schizophrenia was associated with neural inefficiency in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex after covarying for the effects of acquisition site, diagnosis, and population stratification. We also provide additional supporting evidence for our original findings using scores based on results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium study. Gene ontology analysis of the PGRS highlighted genetic loci involved in brain development and several other processes possibly contributing to disease etiology. Our study permits new insights into the additive effect of hundreds of genetic susceptibility loci on a brain-based intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. The combined impact of many common genetic variants of small effect are likely to better reveal etiologic mechanisms of the disorder than the study of single common genetic variants.
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Smoking status as a potential confounder in the study of brain structure in schizophrenia.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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Several but not all MRI studies have reported volume reductions in the hippocampus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in patients with schizophrenia. Given the high prevalence of smoking among schizophrenia patients and the fact that smoking has also been associated with alterations in brain morphology, this study evaluated whether a proportion of the known gray matter reductions in key brain regions may be attributed to smoking rather than to schizophrenia alone. We examined structural MRI data of 112 schizophrenia patients (53 smokers and 59 non-smokers) and 77 healthy non-smoker controls collected by the MCIC study of schizophrenia. An automated atlas based probabilistic method was used to generate volumetric measures of the hippocampus and DLPFC. The two patient groups were matched with respect to demographic and clinical variables. Smoker schizophrenia patients showed significantly lower hippocampal and DLPFC volumes than non-smoker schizophrenia patients. Gray matter volume reductions associated with smoking status ranged between 2.2% and 2.8%. Furthermore, we found significant volume differences between smoker patients and healthy controls in the hippocampus and DLPFC, but not between non-smoker patients and healthy controls. Our data suggest that a proportion of the volume reduction seen in the hippocampus and DLPFC in schizophrenia is associated with smoking rather than with the diagnosis of schizophrenia. These results may have important implications for brain imaging studies comparing schizophrenia patients and other groups with a lower smoking prevalence.
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The MCIC collection: a shared repository of multi-modal, multi-site brain image data from a clinical investigation of schizophrenia.
Neuroinformatics
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2013
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Expertly collected, well-curated data sets consisting of comprehensive clinical characterization and raw structural, functional and diffusion-weighted DICOM images in schizophrenia patients and sex and age-matched controls are now accessible to the scientific community through an on-line data repository (coins.mrn.org). The Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery Institute, now the Mind Research Network (MRN, http://www.mrn.org/ ), comprised of investigators at the University of New Mexico, the University of Minnesota, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the University of Iowa, conducted a cross-sectional study to identify quantitative neuroimaging biomarkers of schizophrenia. Data acquisition across multiple sites permitted the integration and cross-validation of clinical, cognitive, morphometric, and functional neuroimaging results gathered from unique samples of schizophrenia patients and controls using a common protocol across sites. Particular effort was made to recruit patients early in the course of their illness, at the onset of their symptoms. There is a relatively even sampling of illness duration in chronic patients. This data repository will be useful to 1) scientists who can study schizophrenia by further analysis of this cohort and/or by pooling with other data; 2) computer scientists and software algorithm developers for testing and validating novel registration, segmentation, and other analysis software; and 3) educators in the fields of neuroimaging, medical image analysis and medical imaging informatics who need exemplar data sets for courses and workshops. Sharing provides the opportunity for independent replication of already published results from this data set and novel exploration. This manuscript describes the inclusion/exclusion criteria, imaging parameters and other information that will assist those wishing to use this data repository.
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Associations of White Matter Integrity and Cortical Thickness in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Controls.
Schizophr Bull
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2013
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Typical brain development includes coordinated changes in both white matter (WM) integrity and cortical thickness (CT). These processes have been shown to be disrupted in schizophrenia, which is characterized by abnormalities in WM microstructure and by reduced CT. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between WM markers and cortex-wide CT in healthy controls (HCs) and patients with schizophrenia (SCZ). Using diffusion tensor imaging and structural magnetic resonance imaging data of the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study (130 HC and 111 SCZ), we tested for associations between (a) fractional anisotropy in selected manually labeled WM pathways (corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiation, and superior longitudinal fasciculus) and CT, and (b) the number of lesion-like WM regions ("potholes") and CT. In HC, but not SCZ, we found highly significant negative associations between WM integrity and CT in several pathways, including frontal, temporal, and occipital brain regions. Conversely, in SCZ the number of WM potholes correlated with reduced CT in the left lateral temporal gyrus, left fusiform, and left lateral occipital brain area. Taken together, we found differential patterns of association between WM integrity and CT in HC and SCZ. Although the pattern in HC can be explained from a developmental perspective, the reduced gray matter CT in SCZ patients might be the result of focal but spatially heterogeneous disruptions of WM integrity.
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Stroke by carotid artery complete occlusion in kawasaki disease: case report and review of literature.
Pediatr. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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Kawasaki disease is an acute and time-limited systemic vasculitis primarily affecting young children.
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A longitudinal study of the reliability of acupuncture deqi sensations in knee osteoarthritis.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2013
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Deqi is one of the core concepts in acupuncture theory and encompasses a range of sensations. In this study, we used the MGH Acupuncture Sensation Scale (MASS) to measure and assess the reliability of the sensations evoked by acupuncture needle stimulation in a longitudinal clinical trial on knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used as the clinical outcome. Thirty OA patients were randomized into one of three groups (high dose, low dose, and sham acupuncture) for 4?weeks. We found that, compared with sham acupuncture, real acupuncture (combining high and low doses) produced significant improvement in knee pain (P = .025) and function in sport (P = .049). Intraclass correlation analysis showed that patients reliably rated 11 of the 12 acupuncture sensations listed on the MASS and that heaviness was rated most consistently. Overall perceived sensation (MASS Index) (P = .014), ratings of soreness (P = .002), and aching (P = .002) differed significantly across acupuncture groups. Compared to sham acupuncture, real acupuncture reliably evoked stronger deqi sensations and led to better clinical outcomes when measured in a chronic pain population. Our findings highlight the MASS as a useful tool for measuring deqi in acupuncture research.
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S1 is associated with chronic low back pain: a functional and structural MRI study.
Mol Pain
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2013
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A fundamental characteristic of neural circuits is the capacity for plasticity in response to experience. Neural plasticity is associated with the development of chronic pain disorders. In this study, we investigated 1) brain resting state functional connectivity (FC) differences between patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) and matched healthy controls (HC); 2) FC differences within the cLBP patients as they experienced different levels of endogenous low back pain evoked by exercise maneuvers, and 3) morphometric differences between cLBP patients and matched HC. We found the dynamic character of FC in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in cLBP patients, i.e., S1 FC decreased when the patients experienced low intensity LBP as compared with matched healthy controls, and FC at S1 increased when cLBP patients experienced high intensity LBP as compared with the low intensity condition. In addition, we also found increased cortical thickness in the bilateral S1 somatotopically associated with the lower back in cLBP patients as compared to healthy controls. Our results provide evidence of structural plasticity co-localized with areas exhibiting FC changes in S1 in cLBP patients.
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Genetic variation in GAD1 is associated with cortical thickness in the parahippocampal gyrus.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2013
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Patients with schizophrenia show widespread cortical thickness reductions throughout the brain. Likewise, reduced expression of the ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD1) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3749034 in the corresponding gene have been associated with schizophrenia. We tested whether this SNP is associated with reduced cortical thickness, an intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. Because of the well known interactions between the GABAergic and dopaminergic systems, we examined whether associations between GAD1 rs3749034 and cortical thickness are modulated by the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met genotype. Structural MRI and genotype data was obtained from 94 healthy subjects enrolled in the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study to examine the relations between GAD1 genotype and cortical thickness. Our data show a robust reduction of cortical thickness in the left parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) in G allele homozygotes of GAD1 rs3749034. When we stratified our analyses according to the COMT Val158Met genotype, cortical thickness reductions of G allele homozygotes were only found in the presence of the Val allele. Genetic risk variants of schizophrenia in the GABAergic system might interact with the dopaminergic system and impact brain structure and functioning. Our findings point to the importance of the GABAergic system in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.
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Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, frontoparietal control, and default mode networks: SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN, and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable, with no significant changes of subjects pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to interindividual differences in pain sensitivity.
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The impact of genome-wide supported schizophrenia risk variants in the neurogranin gene on brain structure and function.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The neural mechanisms underlying genetic risk for schizophrenia, a highly heritable psychiatric condition, are still under investigation. New schizophrenia risk genes discovered through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), such as neurogranin (NRGN), can be used to identify these mechanisms. In this study we examined the association of two common NRGN risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with functional and structural brain-based intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia. We obtained structural, functional MRI and genotype data of 92 schizophrenia patients and 114 healthy volunteers from the multisite Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study. Two schizophrenia-associated NRGN SNPs (rs12807809 and rs12541) were tested for association with working memory-elicited dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity and surface-wide cortical thickness. NRGN rs12541 risk allele homozygotes (TT) displayed increased working memory-related activity in several brain regions, including the left DLPFC, left insula, left somatosensory cortex and the cingulate cortex, when compared to non-risk allele carriers. NRGN rs12807809 non-risk allele (C) carriers showed reduced cortical gray matter thickness compared to risk allele homozygotes (TT) in an area comprising the right pericalcarine gyrus, the right cuneus, and the right lingual gyrus. Our study highlights the effects of schizophrenia risk variants in the NRGN gene on functional and structural brain-based intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia. These results support recent GWAS findings and further implicate NRGN in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by suggesting that genetic NRGN risk variants contribute to subtle changes in neural functioning and anatomy that can be quantified with neuroimaging methods.
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Are all placebo effects equal? Placebo pills, sham acupuncture, cue conditioning and their association.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Placebo treatments and healing rituals have been used to treat pain throughout history. The present within-subject crossover study examines the variability in individual responses to placebo treatment with verbal suggestion and visual cue conditioning by investigating whether responses to different types of placebo treatment, as well as conditioning responses, correlate with one another. Secondarily, this study also examines whether responses to sham acupuncture correlate with responses to genuine acupuncture. Healthy subjects were recruited to participate in two sequential experiments. Experiment one is a five-session crossover study. In each session, subjects received one of four treatments: placebo pills (described as Tylenol), sham acupuncture, genuine acupuncture, or no treatment rest control condition. Before and after each treatment, paired with a verbal suggestion of positive effect, each subjects pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain ratings to calibrated heat pain were measured. At least 14 days after completing experiment one, all subjects were invited to participate in experiment two, during which their analgesic responses to conditioned visual cues were tested. Forty-eight healthy subjects completed experiment one, and 45 completed experiment two. The results showed significantly different effects of genuine acupuncture, placebo pill and rest control on pain threshold. There was no significant association between placebo pills, sham acupuncture and cue conditioning effects, indicating that individuals may respond to unique healing rituals in different ways. This outcome suggests that placebo response may be a complex behavioral phenomenon that has properties that comprise a state, rather than a trait characteristic. This could explain the difficulty of detecting a signature for "placebo responders." However, a significant association was found between the genuine and sham acupuncture treatments, implying that the non-specific effects of acupuncture may contribute to the analgesic effect observed in genuine acupuncture analgesia.
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A Genome-Wide Association Study Suggests Novel Loci Associated with a Schizophrenia-Related Brain-Based Phenotype.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Patients with schizophrenia and their siblings typically show subtle changes of brain structures, such as a reduction of hippocampal volume. Hippocampal volume is heritable, may explain a variety of cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia and is thus considered an intermediate phenotype for this mental illness. The aim of our analyses was to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) related to hippocampal volume without making prior assumptions about possible candidate genes. In this study, we combined genetics, imaging and neuropsychological data obtained from the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study of schizophrenia (n?=?328). A total of 743,591 SNPs were tested for association with hippocampal volume in a genome-wide association study. Gene expression profiles of human hippocampal tissue were investigated for gene regions of significantly associated SNPs. None of the genetic markers reached genome-wide significance. However, six highly correlated SNPs (rs4808611, rs35686037, rs12982178, rs1042178, rs10406920, rs8170) on chromosome 19p13.11, located within or in close proximity to the genes NR2F6, USHBP1, and BABAM1, as well as four SNPs in three other genomic regions (chromosome 1, 2 and 10) had p-values between 6.75×10(-6) and 8.3×10(-7). Using existing data of a very recently published GWAS of hippocampal volume and additional data of a multicentre study in a large cohort of adolescents of European ancestry, we found supporting evidence for our results. Furthermore, allelic differences in rs4808611 and rs8170 were highly associated with differential mRNA expression in the cis-acting region. Associations with memory functioning indicate a possible functional importance of the identified risk variants. Our findings provide new insights into the genetic architecture of a brain structure closely linked to schizophrenia. In silico replication, mRNA expression and cognitive data provide additional support for the relevance of our findings. Identification of causal variants and their functional effects may unveil yet unknown players in the neurodevelopment and the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders.
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Neural correlates of chronic low back pain measured by arterial spin labeling.
Anesthesiology
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2011
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The varying nature of chronic pain (CP) is difficult to correlate to neural activity using typical functional magnetic resonance imaging methods. Arterial spin labeling is a perfusion-based imaging technique allowing the absolute quantification of regional cerebral blood flow, which is a surrogate measure of neuronal activity.
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Sex similarities and differences in pain-related periaqueductal gray connectivity.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2011
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This study investigated sex similarities and differences in pain-related functional connectivity in 60 healthy subjects. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and psychophysiological interaction analysis to investigate how exposure to low vs high experimental pain modulates the functional connectivity of the periaqueductal gray (PAG). We found no sex differences in pain thresholds, and in both men and women, the PAG was more functionally connected with the somatosensory cortex, the supplemental motor area, cerebellum, and thalamus during high pain, consistent with anatomic predictions. Twenty-six men displayed a pain-induced increase in PAG functional connectivity with the amygdala caudate and putamen that was not observed in women. In an extensive literature search, we found that female animals have been largely overlooked when the connections between the PAG and the amygdala have been described, and that women are systematically understudied with regard to endogenous pain inhibition. Our results emphasize the importance of including both male and female subjects when studying basic mechanisms of pain processing, and point toward a possible sex difference in endogenous pain inhibition.
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The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism affects brain responses to repeated painful stimuli.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2011
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Despite the explosion of interest in the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in pain sensitivity, conflicting findings have emerged for most of the identified "pain genes". Perhaps the prime example of this inconsistency is represented by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), as its substantial association to pain sensitivity has been reported in various studies, but rejected in several others. In line with findings from behavioral studies, we hypothesized that the effect of COMT on pain processing would become apparent only when the pain system was adequately challenged (i.e., after repeated pain stimulation). In the present study, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to investigate the brain response to heat pain stimuli in 54 subjects genotyped for the common COMT val158met polymorphism (val/val?=?n 22, val/met?=?n 20, met/met?=?n 12). Met/met subjects exhibited stronger pain-related fMRI signals than val/val in several brain structures, including the periaqueductal gray matter, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, hippocampal formation and precuneus. These effects were observed only for high intensity pain stimuli after repeated administration. In spite of our relatively small sample size, our results suggest that COMT appears to affect pain processing. Our data demonstrate that the effect of COMT on pain processing can be detected in presence of 1) a sufficiently robust challenge to the pain system to detect a genotype effect, and/or 2) the recruitment of pain-dampening compensatory mechanisms by the putatively more pain sensitive met homozygotes. These findings may help explain the inconsistencies in reported findings of the impact of COMT in pain regulation.
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Associations of cortical thickness and cognition in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.
Schizophr Bull
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2011
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Previous studies have found varying relationships between cognitive functioning and brain volumes in patients with schizophrenia. However, cortical thickness may more closely reflect cytoarchitectural characteristics than gray matter density or volume estimates. Here, we aimed to compare associations between regional variation in cortical thickness and executive functions, memory, as well as verbal and spatial processing in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls (HCs). We obtained magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological data for 131 patients and 138 matched controls. Automated cortical pattern matching methods allowed testing for associations with cortical thickness estimated as the shortest distance between the gray/white matter border and the pial surface at thousands of points across the entire cortical surface. Two independent measures of working memory showed robust associations with cortical thickness in lateral prefrontal cortex in HCs, whereas patients exhibited associations between working memory and cortical thickness in the right middle and superior temporal lobe. This study provides additional evidence for a disrupted structure-function relationship in schizophrenia. In line with the prefrontal inefficiency hypothesis, schizophrenia patients may engage a larger compensatory network of brain regions other than frontal cortex to recall and manipulate verbal material in working memory.
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Automated probabilistic reconstruction of white-matter pathways in health and disease using an atlas of the underlying anatomy.
Front Neuroinform
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2011
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We have developed a method for automated probabilistic reconstruction of a set of major white-matter pathways from diffusion-weighted MR images. Our method is called TRACULA (TRActs Constrained by UnderLying Anatomy) and utilizes prior information on the anatomy of the pathways from a set of training subjects. By incorporating this prior knowledge in the reconstruction procedure, our method obviates the need for manual interaction with the tract solutions at a later stage and thus facilitates the application of tractography to large studies. In this paper we illustrate the application of the method on data from a schizophrenia study and investigate whether the inclusion of both patients and healthy subjects in the training set affects our ability to reconstruct the pathways reliably. We show that, since our method does not constrain the exact spatial location or shape of the pathways but only their trajectory relative to the surrounding anatomical structures, a set a of healthy training subjects can be used to reconstruct the pathways accurately in patients as well as in controls.
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For placebo effects in medicine, seeing is believing.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2011
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The gold standard for determining the efficacy of biomedical therapies is the detection of a significant difference between the therapeutic effects of an active pharmacological agent or procedure and a matched inert placebo in a randomized controlled trial. Detecting this difference has become a challenge for medicine, especially for outcomes that are based on patient self-rated scales. Yet factors that contribute to placebo responses have received scant attention. In this issue of Science Translational Medicine, Bingel et al. report on an example of how noninvasive whole-brain imaging contributes to our understanding of brain-based placebo effects. Here we highlight ways in which neuroimaging is catalyzing a revolution in societys perspective of placebo effects by providing a compelling visualization of how brain activities that reflect a persons thoughts, feelings, and past experiences can enhance or antagonize his or her response to a medical treatment.
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DISC1 is associated with cortical thickness and neural efficiency.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is known to play a major role during brain development and is a candidate gene for schizophrenia. Cortical thickness is highly heritable and several MRI studies have shown widespread reductions of cortical thickness in patients with schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the effects of variation in DISC1 on cortical thickness. In a subsequent analysis we tested whether the identified DISC1 risk variant is also associated with neural activity during working memory functioning.
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Neuropsychological testing and structural magnetic resonance imaging as diagnostic biomarkers early in the course of schizophrenia and related psychoses.
Neuroinformatics
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2011
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Making an accurate diagnosis of schizophrenia and related psychoses early in the course of the disease is important for initiating treatment and counseling patients and families. In this study, we developed classification models for early disease diagnosis using structural MRI (sMRI) and neuropsychological (NP) testing. We used sMRI measurements and NP test results from 28 patients with recent-onset schizophrenia and 47 healthy subjects, drawn from the larger sample of the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium. We developed diagnostic models based on Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) following two approaches; namely, (a) stepwise (STP) LDA on the original measurements, and (b) LDA on variables created through Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and selected using the Humphrey-Ilgen parallel analysis. Error estimation of the modeling algorithms was evaluated by leave-one-out external cross-validation. These analyses were performed on sMRI and NP variables separately and in combination. The following classification accuracy was obtained for different variables and modeling algorithms. sMRI only: (a) STP-LDA: 64.3% sensitivity and 76.6% specificity, (b) PCA-LDA: 67.9% sensitivity and 72.3% specificity. NP only: (a) STP-LDA: 71.4% sensitivity and 80.9% specificity, (b) PCA-LDA: 78.5% sensitivity and 91.5% specificity. Combined sMRI-NP: (a) STP-LDA: 64.3% sensitivity and 83.0% specificity, (b) PCA-LDA: 89.3% sensitivity and 93.6% specificity. (i) Maximal diagnostic accuracy was achieved by combining sMRI and NP variables. (ii) NP variables were more informative than sMRI, indicating that cognitive deficits can be detected earlier than volumetric structural abnormalities. (iii) PCA-LDA yielded more accurate classification than STP-LDA. As these sMRI and NP tests are widely available, they can increase accuracy of early intervention strategies and possibly be used in evaluating treatment response.
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Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia II: developing imaging biomarkers to enhance treatment development for schizophrenia and related disorders.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2011
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The Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS) initiative, funded by an R13 from the National Institute of Mental Health, seeks to enhance translational research in treatment development for impaired cognition in schizophrenia by developing tools from cognitive neuroscience into useful measures of treatment effects on behavior and brain function. An initial series of meetings focused on the selection of a new set of tasks from cognitive neuroscience for the measurement of treatment effects on specific cognitive and neural systems. Subsequent validation and optimization studies are underway and a subset of validated measures with well-characterized psychometric properties will be generally available in 2011. This article describes results of the first meeting of the second phase of the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia, which seeks to develop imaging biomarkers and improved animal models to enhance translational research. In this meeting, we considered issues related to the use of methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and transcranial magnetic simulation as biomarkers for treatment development. We explored the biological nature of the signals measured by each method, their validity and reliability as measures of cognition-related neural activity, potential confounds related to drug effects on the signal of interest, and conceptual, methodological, and pragmatic issues related to their use in preclinical, first into human, and multicenter phase II and III studies. This overview article describes the background and goals of the meeting together with a summary of the major issues discussed in more detail in the accompanying articles appearing in this issue of Biological Psychiatry.
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WITHDRAWN: Erratum to "Does function follow form?: Methods to fuse structural and functional brain images show decreased linkage in schizophrenia" [NeuroImage 49 (2010) 2626-2637].
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2010
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This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.
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Imaging the functional connectivity of the Periaqueductal Gray during genuine and sham electroacupuncture treatment.
Mol Pain
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2010
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Electroacupuncture (EA) is currently one of the most popular acupuncture modalities. However, the continuous stimulation characteristic of EA treatment presents challenges to the use of conventional functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) approaches for the investigation of neural mechanisms mediating treatment response because of the requirement for brief and intermittent stimuli in event related or block designed task paradigms. A relatively new analysis method, functional connectivity fMRI (fcMRI), has great potential for studying continuous treatment modalities such as EA. In a previous study, we found that, compared with sham acupuncture, EA can significantly reduce Periaqueductal Gray (PAG) activity when subsequently evoked by experimental pain. Given the PAGs important role in mediating acupuncture analgesia, in this study we investigated functional connectivity with the area of the PAG we previously identified and how that connectivity was affected by genuine and sham EA.
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Multi-site characterization of an fMRI working memory paradigm: reliability of activation indices.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
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Neuroimaging studies are facilitated significantly when it is possible to recruit subjects and acquire data at multiple sites. However, the use of different scanners and acquisition protocols is a potential source of variability in multi-site data. In this work we present a multi-site study of the reliability of fMRI activation indices, where 10 healthy volunteers were scanned at 4 different sites while performing a working memory paradigm. Our results indicate that, even with different scanner manufacturers and field strengths, activation variability due to site differences is small compared to variability due to subject differences in this cognitive task, provided we choose an appropriate activation measure.
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The impact of placebo, psychopathology, and expectations on the response to acupuncture needling in patients with chronic low back pain.
J Pain
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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Comorbid psychopathology is a variable not explored in the acupuncture RCTs that could explain whether subgroups of patients with chronic low back pain have differential responses to acupuncture or placebo treatments. This was a controlled, blinded, crossover trial of verum acupuncture and validated sham acupuncture in 40 CLBP patients, with a Low or High level of psychiatric comorbidity. They completed a 0 to 10 rating scale for pain at the beginning and end of each treatment session, and rated their expectations for change in pain. Verum acupuncture was performed at Large Intestine 4 on the dorsal right hand for 30 minutes by a licensed acupuncturist. Data analysis used percent improvement in pain as the primary outcome for each of the treatment sessions. Both groups (21 Low and 19 High) reported significant analgesia with verum acupuncture needling, mean 33%, P = .9 for difference between groups; and with placebo, 26%, P = .09. In both groups, expectations were only a significant predictor of verum acupuncture response, P = .002, such that those with greater expectations had greater pain relief. Psychiatric comorbidity does not significantly impact acupuncture or placebo acupuncture analgesia in CLBP. It does not affect the positive impact of expectations on reported pain relief from real acupuncture.
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Global white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia: a multisite diffusion tensor imaging study.
Schizophr Bull
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2009
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Emerging evidence implicates white matter (WM) abnormalities in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in the presentation of WM abnormalities in the existing studies. The object of this study was to evaluate WM integrity in a large sample of patients with first-episode (FE) and chronic schizophrenia in comparison to matched control groups. Our goal was to assess whether WM findings occurred early in the illness or whether these abnormalities developed with the illness over time.
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The COMT Val108/158Met polymorphism and medial temporal lobe volumetry in patients with schizophrenia and healthy adults.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2009
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Abnormalities of the medial temporal lobe have been consistently demonstrated in schizophrenia. A common functional polymorphism, Val108/158Met, in the putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), has been shown to influence medial temporal lobe function. However, the effects of this polymorphism on volumes of medial temporal lobe structures, particularly in patients with schizophrenia, are less clear. Here we measured the effects of COMT Val108/158Met genotype on the volume of two regions within the medial temporal lobe, the amygdala and hippocampus, in patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. We obtained MRI and genotype data for 98 schizophrenic patients and 114 matched controls. An automated atlas-based segmentation algorithm was used to generate volumetric measures of the amygdala and hippocampus. Regression analyses included COMT met allele load as an additive effect, and also controlled for age, intracranial volume, gender and acquisition site. Across patients and controls, each copy of the COMT met allele was associated on average with a 2.6% increase in right amygdala volume, a 3.8% increase in left amygdala volume and a 2.2% increase in right hippocampus volume. There were no effects of COMT genotype on volumes of the whole brain and prefrontal regions. Thus, the COMT Val108/158Met polymorphism was shown to influence medial temporal lobe volumes in a linear-additive manner, mirroring its effect on dopamine catabolism. Taken together with previous work, our data support a model in which lower COMT activity, and a resulting elevation in extracellular dopamine levels, stimulates growth of medial temporal lobe structures.
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Exploring the brain in pain: activations, deactivations and their relation.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2009
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The majority of neuroimaging studies on pain focuses on the study of BOLD activations, and more rarely on deactivations. In this study, in a relatively large cohort of subjects (N=61), we assess (a) the extent of brain activation and deactivation during the application of two different heat pain levels (HIGH and LOW) and (b) the relations between these two directions of fMRI signal change. Furthermore, in a subset of our subjects (N=12), we assess (c) the functional connectivity of pain-activated or -deactivated regions during resting states. As previously observed, we find that pain stimuli induce intensity dependent (HIGH pain>LOW pain) fMRI signal increases across the pain matrix. Simultaneously, the noxious stimuli induce activity decreases in several brain regions, including some of the core structures of the default network (DMN). In contrast to what we observe with the signal increases, the extent of deactivations is greater for LOW than HIGH pain stimuli. The functional dissociation between activated and deactivated networks is further supported by correlational and functional connectivity analyses. Our results illustrate the absence of a linear relationship between pain activations and deactivations, and therefore suggest that these brain signal changes underlie different aspects of the pain experience.
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Does function follow form?: methods to fuse structural and functional brain images show decreased linkage in schizophrenia.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2009
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When both structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) data are collected they are typically analyzed separately and the joint information is not examined. Techniques that examine joint information can help to find hidden traits in complex disorders such as schizophrenia. The brain is vastly interconnected, and local brain morphology may influence functional activity at distant regions. In this paper we introduce three methods to identify inter-correlations among sMRI and fMRI voxels within the whole brain. We apply these methods to examine sMRI gray matter data and fMRI data derived from an auditory sensorimotor task from a large study of schizophrenia. In Method 1 the sMRI-fMRI cross-correlation matrix is reduced to a histogram and results show that healthy controls (HC) have stronger correlations than do patients with schizophrenia (SZ). In Method 2 the spatial information of sMRI-fMRI correlations is retained. Structural regions in the cerebellum and frontal regions show more positive and more negative correlations, respectively, with functional regions in HC than in SZ. In Method 3 significant sMRI-fMRI inter-regional links are detected, with regions in the cerebellum showing more significant positive correlations with functional regions in HC relative to SZ. Results from all three methods indicate that the linkage between gray matter and functional activation is stronger in HC than SZ. The methods introduced can be easily extended to comprehensively correlate large data sets.
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Dysregulation of working memory and default-mode networks in schizophrenia using independent component analysis, an fBIRN and MCIC study.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2009
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Deficits in working memory (WM) are a consistent neurocognitive marker for schizophrenia. Previous studies have suggested that WM is the product of coordinated activity in distributed functionally connected brain regions. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a data-driven approach that can identify temporally coherent networks that underlie fMRI activity. We applied ICA to an fMRI dataset for 115 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 130 healthy controls by performing the Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm. Here, we describe the first results using ICA to identify differences in the function of WM networks in schizophrenia compared to controls. ICA revealed six networks that showed significant differences between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Four of these networks were negatively task-correlated and showed deactivation across the posterior cingulate, precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, inferior parietal lobules, and parahippocampus. These networks comprise brain regions known as the default-mode network (DMN), a well-characterized set of regions shown to be active during internal modes of cognition and implicated in schizophrenia. Two networks were positively task-correlated, with one network engaging WM regions such as bilateral DLPFC and inferior parietal lobules while the other network engaged primarily the cerebellum. Our results suggest that DLPFC dysfunction in schizophrenia might be lateralized to the left and intrinsically tied to other regions such as the inferior parietal lobule and cingulate gyrus. Furthermore, we found that DMN dysfunction in schizophrenia exists across multiple subnetworks of the DMN and that these subnetworks are individually relevant to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In summary, this large multisite study identified multiple temporally coherent networks, which are aberrant in schizophrenia versus healthy controls and suggests that both task-correlated and task-anticorrelated networks may serve as potential biomarkers.
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Brain-performance correlates of working memory retrieval in schizophrenia: a cognitive modeling approach.
Schizophr Bull
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
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Correlations of cognitive functioning with brain activation during a sternberg item recognition paradigm (SIRP) were investigated in patients with schizophrenia and in healthy controls studied at 8 sites. To measure memory scanning times, 4 response time models were fit to SIRP data. The best fitting model assumed exhaustive serial memory scanning followed by self-terminating memory search and involved one intercept parameter to represent SIRP processes not contributing directly to memory scanning. Patients displayed significantly longer response times with increasing memory load and differed on the memory scanning, memory search, and intercept parameters of the best fitting probability model. Groups differed in the correlation between the memory scanning parameter and linear brain response to increasing memory load within left inferior and left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral caudate, and right precuneus. The pattern of findings in these regions indicated that high scanning capacity was associated with high neural capacity among healthy subjects but that scanning speed was uncoupled from brain response to increasing memory load among schizophrenia patients. Group differences in correlation of the best fitting models scanning parameter with a quadratic trend in brain response to increasing memory load suggested inefficient or disordered patterns of neural inhibition among individuals with schizophrenia, especially in the left perirhinal and entorhinal cortices. The results show at both cognitive and neural levels that disordered memory scanning contributes to deficient SIRP performance among schizophrenia patients.
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Voxel-based morphometric multisite collaborative study on schizophrenia.
Schizophr Bull
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
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Regional gray matter (GM) abnormalities are well known to exist in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has been previously used on structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) data to characterize these abnormalities. Two multisite schizophrenia studies, the Functional Biomedical Informatics Research Network and the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium, which include 9 data collection sites, are evaluating the efficacy of pooling structural imaging data across imaging centers. Such a pooling of data could yield the increased statistical power needed to elucidate effects that may not be seen with smaller samples. VBM analyses were performed to evaluate the consistency of patient versus control gray matter concentration (GMC) differences across the study sites, as well as the effects of combining multisite data. Integration of data from both studies yielded a large sample of 503 subjects, including 266 controls and 237 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective or schizophreniform disorder. The data were analyzed using the combined sample, as well as analyzing each of the 2 multisite studies separately. A consistent pattern of reduced relative GMC in schizophrenia patients compared with controls was found across all study sites. Imaging center-specific effects were evaluated using a region of interest analysis. Overall, the findings support the use of VBM in combined multisite studies. This analysis of schizophrenics and controls from around the United States provides continued supporting evidence for GM deficits in the temporal lobes, anterior cingulate, and frontal regions in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.
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Functional neuroanatomical investigation of vision-related acupuncture point specificity--a multisession fMRI study.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2009
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The concept that specific acupuncture points have salubrious effects on distant target organ systems is a salient feature of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In this study, we used a multiple-session experiment to test whether electroacupuncture stimulation at two TCM vision-related acupoints, UB 60 and GB 37, located on the leg, could produce fMRI signal changes in the occipital regions of the brain, and the specificity of this effect when compared with stimulation at an adjacent non-acupoint (NAP). Six normal, acupuncture naive subjects completed the study. Each subject participated in six identical scanning sessions. Voxelwise group analysis showed that electroacupuncture stimulation at both vision-related acupoints and the NAP produced modest, comparable fMRI signal decreases in the occipital cortex, including the bilateral cuneus, calcarine fissure and surrounding areas, lingual gyrus, and lateral occipital gyrus. Further analysis of fMRI signal changes in occipital cortex showed no significant difference among the three points, UB 60, GB 37, and NAP. Our results thus do not support the view that acupuncture stimulation at vision-related acupoints induces specific fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes in the occipital cortex. We speculate that cross modal inhibition, produced by needling-evoked somatosensory stimulation, may account for our finding of BOLD signal decreases in the occipital cortex. Given the complexity of acupuncture systems and brain activity, additional work is required to determine whether functional neuroanatomical correlates of acupoint specificity can be validated by means of brain imaging tools.
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Expectancy and treatment interactions: a dissociation between acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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Recent advances in placebo research have demonstrated the minds power to alter physiology. In this study, we combined an expectancy manipulation model with both verum and sham acupuncture treatments to address: 1) how and to what extent treatment and expectancy effects - including both subjective pain intensity levels (pain sensory ratings) and objective physiological activations (fMRI) - interact; and 2) if the underlying mechanism of expectancy remains the same whether placebo treatment is given alone or in conjunction with active treatment. The results indicate that although verum acupuncture+high expectation and sham acupuncture+high expectation induced subjective reports of analgesia of equal magnitude, fMRI analysis showed that verum acupuncture produced greater fMRI signal decrease in pain related brain regions during application of calibrated heat pain stimuli on the right arm. We believe our study provides brain imaging evidence for the existence of different mechanisms underlying acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia. Our results also suggest that the brain network involved in expectancy may vary under different treatment situations (verum and sham acupuncture treatment).
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MRI-derived measurements of human subcortical, ventricular and intracranial brain volumes: Reliability effects of scan sessions, acquisition sequences, data analyses, scanner upgrade, scanner vendors and field strengths.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2009
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Automated MRI-derived measurements of in-vivo human brain volumes provide novel insights into normal and abnormal neuroanatomy, but little is known about measurement reliability. Here we assess the impact of image acquisition variables (scan session, MRI sequence, scanner upgrade, vendor and field strengths), FreeSurfer segmentation pre-processing variables (image averaging, B1 field inhomogeneity correction) and segmentation analysis variables (probabilistic atlas) on resultant image segmentation volumes from older (n=15, mean age 69.5) and younger (both n=5, mean ages 34 and 36.5) healthy subjects. The variability between hippocampal, thalamic, caudate, putamen, lateral ventricular and total intracranial volume measures across sessions on the same scanner on different days is less than 4.3% for the older group and less than 2.3% for the younger group. Within-scanner measurements are remarkably reliable across scan sessions, being minimally affected by averaging of multiple acquisitions, B1 correction, acquisition sequence (MPRAGE vs. multi-echo-FLASH), major scanner upgrades (Sonata-Avanto, Trio-TrioTIM), and segmentation atlas (MPRAGE or multi-echo-FLASH). Volume measurements across platforms (Siemens Sonata vs. GE Signa) and field strengths (1.5 T vs. 3 T) result in a volume difference bias but with a comparable variance as that measured within-scanner, implying that multi-site studies may not necessarily require a much larger sample to detect a specific effect. These results suggest that volumes derived from automated segmentation of T1-weighted structural images are reliable measures within the same scanner platform, even after upgrades; however, combining data across platform and across field-strength introduces a bias that should be considered in the design of multi-site studies, such as clinical drug trials. The results derived from the young groups (scanner upgrade effects and B1 inhomogeneity correction effects) should be considered as preliminary and in need for further validation with a larger dataset.
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An fMRI study on the interaction and dissociation between expectation of pain relief and acupuncture treatment.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2009
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It is well established that expectation can significantly modulate pain perception. In this study, we combined an expectancy manipulation model and fMRI to investigate how expectation can modulate acupuncture treatment. Forty-eight subjects completed the study. The analysis on two verum acupuncture groups with different expectancy levels indicates that expectancy can significantly influence acupuncture analgesia for experimental pain. Conditioning positive expectation can amplify acupuncture analgesia as detected by subjective pain sensory rating changes and objective fMRI signal changes in response to calibrated noxious stimuli. Diminished positive expectation appeared to inhibit acupuncture analgesia. This modulation effect is spatially specific, inducing analgesia exclusively in regions of the body where expectation is focused. Thus, expectation should be used as an important covariate in future studies evaluating acupuncture efficacy. In addition, we also observed dissociation between subjective reported analgesia and objective fMRI signal changes to calibrated pain in the analysis across all four groups. We hypothesize that as a peripheral-central modulation, acupuncture needle stimulation may inhibit incoming noxious stimuli; while as a top-down modulation, expectancy (placebo) may work through the emotional circuit.
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Functional connectivity of the frontoparietal network predicts cognitive modulation of pain.
Pain
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The experience of pain can be significantly influenced by expectancy (predictive cues). This ability to modulate pain has the potential to affect therapeutic analgesia substantially and constitutes a foundation for nonpharmacological pain relief. In this study, we investigated (1) brain regions involved in visual cue modulation of pain during anticipation of pain, pain administration, and pain rating; and (2) the association between pretest resting state functional connectivity and the magnitude of cue effects on pain ratings. We found that after cue conditioning, visual cues can significantly modulate subjective pain ratings. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results suggested that brain regions pertaining to the frontoparietal network (prefrontal and parietal cortex) and a pain/emotion modulatory region (rostral anterior cingulate cortex) are involved in cue modulation during both pain anticipation and administration stage. Most interestingly, we found that pretest resting state functional connectivity between the frontoparietal network (as identified by independent component analysis) and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex was positively associated with cue effects on pain rating changes. We believe that these findings will shed new light on our understanding of variable cue/expectancy effects across individuals and how the intrinsic connectivity of the brain may influence expectancy-induced modulation of pain.
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Default mode network connectivity encodes clinical pain: an arterial spin labeling study.
Pain
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Neuroimaging studies have suggested the presence of alterations in the anatomo-functional properties of the brain of patients with chronic pain. However, investigation of the brain circuitry supporting the perception of clinical pain presents significant challenges, particularly when using traditional neuroimaging approaches. While potential neuroimaging markers for clinical pain have included resting brain connectivity, these cross-sectional studies have not examined sensitivity to within-subject exacerbation of pain. We used the dual regression probabilistic Independent Component Analysis approach to investigate resting-state connectivity on arterial spin labeling data. Brain connectivity was compared between patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) and healthy controls, before and after the performance of maneuvers aimed at exacerbating clinical pain levels in the patients. Our analyses identified multiple resting state networks, including the default mode network (DMN). At baseline, patients demonstrated stronger DMN connectivity to the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC), left inferior parietal lobule, and right insula (rINS). Patients baseline clinical pain correlated positively with connectivity strength between the DMN and right insula (DMN-rINS). The performance of calibrated physical maneuvers induced changes in pain, which were paralleled by changes in DMN-rINS connectivity. Maneuvers also disrupted the DMN-pgACC connectivity, which at baseline was anticorrelated with pain. Finally, baseline DMN connectivity predicted maneuver-induced changes in both pain and DMN-rINS connectivity. Our results support the use of arterial spin labeling to evaluate clinical pain, and the use of resting DMN connectivity as a potential neuroimaging biomarker for chronic pain perception.
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Nonconscious activation of placebo and nocebo pain responses.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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The dominant theories of human placebo effects rely on a notion that consciously perceptible cues, such as verbal information or distinct stimuli in classical conditioning, provide signals that activate placebo effects. However, growing evidence suggest that behavior can be triggered by stimuli presented outside of conscious awareness. Here, we performed two experiments in which the responses to thermal pain stimuli were assessed. The first experiment assessed whether a conditioning paradigm, using clearly visible cues for high and low pain, could induce placebo and nocebo responses. The second experiment, in a separate group of subjects, assessed whether conditioned placebo and nocebo responses could be triggered in response to nonconscious (masked) exposures to the same cues. A total of 40 healthy volunteers (24 female, mean age 23 y) were investigated in a laboratory setting. Participants rated each pain stimulus on a numeric response scale, ranging from 0 = no pain to 100 = worst imaginable pain. Significant placebo and nocebo effects were found in both experiment 1 (using clearly visible stimuli) and experiment 2 (using nonconscious stimuli), indicating that the mechanisms responsible for placebo and nocebo effects can operate without conscious awareness of the triggering cues. This is a unique experimental verification of the influence of nonconscious conditioned stimuli on placebo/nocebo effects and the results challenge the exclusive role of awareness and conscious cognitions in placebo responses.
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Spatial characteristics of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia.
Schizophr Bull
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There is considerable evidence implicating brain white matter (WM) abnormalities in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; however, the spatial localization of WM abnormalities reported in the existing studies is heterogeneous. Thus, the goal of this study was to quantify the spatial characteristics of WM abnormalities in schizophrenia. One hundred and fourteen patients with schizophrenia and 138 matched controls participated in this multisite study involving the Universities of Iowa, Minnesota, and New Mexico, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. We measured fractional anisotropy (FA) in brain WM regions extracted using 3 different image-processing algorithms: regions of interest, tract-based spatial statistics, and the pothole approach. We found that FA was significantly lower in patients using each of the 3 image-processing algorithms. The region-of-interest approach showed multiple regions with lower FA in patients with schizophrenia, with overlap at all 4 sites in the corpus callosum and posterior thalamic radiation. The tract-based spatial statistic approach showed (1) global differences in 3 of the 4 cohorts and (2) lower frontal FA at the Iowa site. Finally, the pothole approach showed a significantly greater number of WM potholes in patients compared to controls at each of the 4 sites. In conclusion, the spatial characteristics of WM abnormalities in schizophrenia reflect a combination of a global low-level decrease in FA, suggesting a diffuse process, coupled with widely dispersed focal reductions in FA that vary spatially among individuals (ie, potholes).
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Disentangling linear and nonlinear brain responses to evoked deep tissue pain.
Pain
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Pain stimuli evoke widespread responses in the brain. However, our understanding of the physiological significance underlying heterogeneous response within different pain-activated and -deactivated regions is still limited. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we evaluated brain responses to a wide range of stimulus intensity levels (1 innocuous, 7 painful) in order to estimate region-specific stimulus-response functions, which we hypothesized could illuminate that regions functional relationship to pain. Linear and nonlinear brain responses to pain were estimated through independent Legendre polynomial transformations of pain ratings within a general linear model. This approach identified at least 5 different, regionally specific activity profiles in the brain. Linearly increasing (eg, primary somatosensory/motor cortex, insulae) and intensity-independent (eg, secondary somatosensory cortex) activation was noted in traditional pain-processing areas, potentially reflecting sensory encoding and all-or-none salience responses, respectively. Multiple activity profiles were seen in areas of the default mode network (DMN): intensity-independent deactivation (eg, posterior cingulate cortex), linearly decreasing (eg, contralateral inferior parietal lobule), and quadratic (U-shaped; eg, medial prefrontal cortex). The latter observation suggests that: (1) different DMN subregions exhibit functional heterogeneity and (2) some DMN subregions respond in a percept-related manner to pain, suggesting closer linkage between the DMN and pain processing than previously thought. Future studies should apply a similar approach using innocuous stimuli of multiple intensities to evaluate whether the response profiles reported here can also be generalized to nonpainful somatosensory processing.
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Heritability of multivariate gray matter measures in schizophrenia.
Twin Res Hum Genet
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Structural brain measures are employed as endophenotypes in the search for schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We analyzed two independent structural imaging datasets with voxel-based morphometry and with source-based morphometry, a multivariate, independent components analysis, to determine the stability and heritability of regional gray matter concentration abnormalities in schizophrenia. The samples comprised 209 and 102 patients with schizophrenia and 208 and 96 healthy volunteers, respectively. The second sample additionally included non-ill siblings of participants with and without schizophrenia. A standard voxel-based analysis showed reproducible regional gray matter deficits in the affected participants compared with unrelated, unaffected controls in both datasets: patients showed significant gray matter concentration deficits in cortical frontal, temporal, and insular lobes. Source-based morphometry (SBM) was applied to the gray matter images of the entire sample to determine the effects of diagnosis on networks of covarying structures. The SBM analysis extracted 24 significant sets of covarying regions (components). Four of these components showed significantly lower gray matter concentrations in patients (p < .05). We determined the familiality of the observed SBM components based on 66 sibling pairs (25 discordant for schizophrenia). Two components, one including the medial frontal, insular, inferior frontal, and temporal lobes, and the other including the posterior occipital lobe, showed significant familiality (p < .05). We conclude that structural brain deficits in schizophrenia are replicable, and that SBM can extract unique familial and likely heritable components. SBM provides a useful data reduction technique that can provide measures that may serve as endophenotypes for schizophrenia.
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Patients with fibromyalgia display less functional connectivity in the brains pain inhibitory network.
Mol Pain
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There is evidence for augmented processing of pain and impaired endogenous pain inhibition in Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM). In order to fully understand the mechanisms involved in FM pathology, there is a need for closer investigation of endogenous pain modulation. In the present study, we compared the functional connectivity of the descending pain inhibitory network in age-matched FM patients and healthy controls (HC).We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 42 subjects; 14 healthy and 28 age-matched FM patients (2 patients per HC), during randomly presented, subjectively calibrated pressure pain stimuli. A seed-based functional connectivity analysis of brain activity was performed. The seed coordinates were based on the findings from our previous study, comparing the fMRI signal during calibrated pressure pain in FM and HC: the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and thalamus.
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The use of functional neuroimaging to evaluate psychological and other non-pharmacological treatments for clinical pain.
Neurosci. Lett.
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A large number of studies have provided evidence for the efficacy of psychological and other non-pharmacological interventions in the treatment of chronic pain. While these methods are increasingly used to treat pain, remarkably few studies focused on the exploration of their neural correlates. The aim of this article was to review the findings from neuroimaging studies that evaluated the neural response to distraction-based techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), clinical hypnosis, mental imagery, physical therapy/exercise, biofeedback, and mirror therapy. To date, the results from studies that used neuroimaging to evaluate these methods have not been conclusive and the experimental methods have been suboptimal for assessing clinical pain. Still, several different psychological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities were associated with increased pain-related activations of executive cognitive brain regions, such as the ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. There was also evidence for decreased pain-related activations in afferent pain regions and limbic structures. If future studies will address the technical and methodological challenges of todays experiments, neuroimaging might have the potential of segregating the neural mechanisms of different treatment interventions and elucidate predictive and mediating factors for successful treatment outcomes. Evaluations of treatment-related brain changes (functional and structural) might also allow for sub-grouping of patients and help to develop individualized treatments.
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Cigarette smoking and white matter microstructure in schizophrenia.
Psychiatry Res
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The majority of patients with schizophrenia smoke cigarettes. Both nicotine use and schizophrenia have been associated with alterations in brain white matter microstructure as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The purpose of this study was to examine fractional anisotropy (FA) in smoking and non-smoking patients with schizophrenia and in healthy volunteers. A total of 43 patients (28 smoking and 15 non-smoking) with schizophrenia and 40 healthy, non-smoking participants underwent DTI. Mean FA was calculated in four global regions of interest (ROIs) (whole brain, cerebellum, brainstem, and total cortical) as well as in four regional ROIs (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes). The non-smoking patient group had a significantly higher intellectual quotient (IQ) compared with the patients who smoked, and our results varied according to whether IQ was included as a covariate. Without IQ correction, significant between-group effects for FA were found in four ROIs: total brain, total cortical, frontal lobe and the occipital lobe. In all cases the FA was lower among the smoking patient group, and highest in the control group. Smoking patients differed significantly from non-smoking patients in the frontal lobe ROI. However, these differences were no longer significant after IQ correction. FA differences between non-smoking patients and controls were not significant. Among smoking and non-smoking patients with schizophrenia but not healthy controls, FA was correlated with IQ. In conclusion, group effects of smoking on FA in schizophrenia might be mediated by IQ. Further, low FA in specific brain areas may be a neural marker for complex pathophysiology and risk for diverse problems such as schizophrenia, low IQ, and nicotine addiction.
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Cumulative genetic risk and prefrontal activity in patients with schizophrenia.
Schizophr Bull
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The lack of consistency of genetic associations in highly heritable mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, remains a challenge in molecular psychiatry. Because clinical phenotypes for psychiatric disorders are often ill defined, considerable effort has been made to relate genetic polymorphisms to underlying physiological aspects of schizophrenia (so called intermediate phenotypes), that may be more reliable. Given the polygenic etiology of schizophrenia, the aim of this work was to form a measure of cumulative genetic risk and study its effect on neural activity during working memory (WM) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Neural activity during the Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm was measured in 79 schizophrenia patients and 99 healthy controls. Participants were genotyped, and a genetic risk score (GRS), which combined the additive effects of 41 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 34 risk genes for schizophrenia, was calculated. These risk SNPs were chosen according to the continuously updated meta-analysis of genetic studies on schizophrenia available at www.schizophreniaresearchforum.org. We found a positive relationship between GRS and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex inefficiency during WM processing. GRS was not correlated with age, performance, intelligence, or medication effects and did not differ between acquisition sites, gender, or diagnostic groups. Our study suggests that cumulative genetic risk, combining the impact of many genes with small effects, is associated with a known brain-based intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. The GRS approach could provide an advantage over studying single genes in studies focusing on the genetic basis of polygenic conditions such as neuropsychiatric disorders.
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Phenotype Matters: The Absence of a Positive Association between Cortical Thinning and Chronic Low Back Pain when Controlling for Salient Clinical Variables.
Clin J Pain
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Studies have associated chronic low back pain (cLBP) with grey matter thinning. But these studies have not controlled for important clinical variables (such as a comorbid affective disorder, pain medication, age, or pain phenotype), which may reduce or eliminate these associations. We conducted cortical thickness and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses in 14 cLBP patients with a discogenic component to their pain, not taking opioids or benzodiazepines, and not depressed or anxious. They were age and gender matched to 14 healthy controls (HCs). An ROI-driven analysis (regions of interest) was conducted, using 18 clusters from a previous arterial spin labeling study demonstrating greater regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in these cLBP subjects than the HCs. Cortical thickness and VBM-based gray matter volume measurements were obtained from a structural MRI scan and group contrasts were calculated. MANOVA showed a trend toward cortical thickening in the right paracentral lobule in cLBP subjects (F(1,17)=3.667, P<0.067), and significant thickening in the right rostral middle frontal gyrus (F(1,17)=6.880, P<0.014). These clusters were non-significant after including age as a covariate (P<0.891; P<0.279). A whole-brain cortical thickness and VBM analysis also did not identify significant clusters of thinning or thickening. Exploratory analyses identified group differences for correlations between age and cortical thickness of the right rostral middle frontal gyrus (cLBP: R=-0.03, P=0.9; HCs: R=-0.81, P<0.001), i.e., HCs demonstrated age-related thinning while cLBP patients did not. Our pilot results suggest that controlling for affect, age, and concurrent medications may reduce or eliminate some of the previously reported structural brain alterations in cLBP.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.