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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Virus-Induced Alterations in Primary Metabolism Modulate Susceptibility to Tobacco rattle virus in Arabidopsis.
Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2014
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During compatible virus infections, plants respond by reprogramming gene expression and metabolite accumulation. While gene expression studies are profuse, our knowledge of the metabolic changes that occur in the presence of the virus is limited. Here we combine gene expression and metabolite profiling in Arabidopsis thaliana infected with Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) in order to investigate the influence of primary metabolism on virus infection. Our results revealed that primary metabolism is reconfigured in many ways during TRV infection, as reflected by significant changes in the levels of sugars and amino acids. Multivariate data analysis revealed that these alterations were particularly conspicuous at the time points of maximal accumulation of TRV although infection time was the dominant source of variance during the process. Furthermore, TRV caused changes in lipid and fatty acid (FA) composition in infected leaves. We found that several Arabidopsis mutants deficient in branched-chain amino acid catabolism or fatty acid metabolism possessed altered susceptibility to TRV. Finally, we showed that increments in the putrescine content in TRV-infected plants correlated with enhanced tolerance to freezing stress in TRV-infected plants, and that impairment of putrescine biosynthesis promoted virus multiplication. Our results thus provide an interesting overview for a better understanding of the relationship between primary metabolism and virus infection.
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Chromatin-Dependent Repression of the Arabidopsis Floral Integrator Genes Involves Plant Specific PHD-Containing Proteins.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2014
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The interplay among histone modifications modulates the expression of master regulatory genes in development. Chromatin effector proteins bind histone modifications and translate the epigenetic status into gene expression patterns that control development. Here, we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific proteins with a plant homeodomain (PHD) motif, SHORT LIFE (SHL) and EARLY BOLTING IN SHORT DAYS (EBS), function in the chromatin-mediated repression of floral initiation and play independent roles in the control of genes regulating flowering. Previous results showed that repression of the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) requires EBS. We establish that SHL is necessary to negatively regulate the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1 (SOC1), another floral integrator. SHL and EBS recognize di- and trimethylated histone H3 at lysine 4 and bind regulatory regions of SOC1 and FT, respectively. These PHD proteins maintain an inactive chromatin conformation in SOC1 and FT by preventing high levels of H3 acetylation, bind HISTONE DEACETYLASE6, and play a central role in regulating flowering time. SHL and EBS are widely conserved in plants but are absent in other eukaryotes, suggesting that the regulatory module mediated by these proteins could represent a distinct mechanism for gene expression control in plants.
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SPX1 is a phosphate-dependent inhibitor of PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE 1 in Arabidopsis.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2014
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To cope with growth in low-phosphate (Pi) soils, plants have evolved adaptive responses that involve both developmental and metabolic changes. PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE 1 (PHR1) and related transcription factors play a central role in the control of Pi starvation responses (PSRs). How Pi levels control PHR1 activity, and thus PSRs, remains to be elucidated. Here, we identify a direct Pi-dependent inhibitor of PHR1 in Arabidopsis, SPX1, a nuclear protein that shares the SPX domain with yeast Pi sensors and with several Pi starvation signaling proteins from plants. Double mutation of SPX1 and of a related gene, SPX2, resulted in molecular and physiological changes indicative of increased PHR1 activity in plants grown in Pi-sufficient conditions or after Pi refeeding of Pi-starved plants but had only a limited effect on PHR1 activity in Pi-starved plants. These data indicate that SPX1 and SPX2 have a cellular Pi-dependent inhibitory effect on PHR1. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the SPX1/PHR1 interaction in planta is highly Pi-dependent. DNA-binding and pull-down assays with bacterially expressed, affinity-purified tagged SPX1 and ?PHR1 proteins showed that SPX1 is a competitive inhibitor of PHR1 binding to its recognition sequence, and that its efficiency is highly dependent on the presence of Pi or phosphite, a nonmetabolizable Pi analog that can repress PSRs. The relative strength of the SPX1/PHR1 interaction is thus directly influenced by Pi, providing a link between Pi perception and signaling.
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Roles of ubiquitination in the control of phosphate starvation responses in plants(f).
J Integr Plant Biol
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2013
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Throughout evolution, plants have evolved sophisticated adaptive responses that allow them to grow with a limited supply of phosphate, the preferential form in which the essential macronutrient phosphorus is absorbed by plants. Most of these responses are aimed to increase phosphate availability and acquisition through the roots, to optimize its usage in metabolic processes, and to protect plants from the deleterious effects of phosphate deficiency stress. Regulation of these adaptive responses requires fine perception of the external and internal phosphate levels, and a complex signal transduction pathway that integrates information on the phosphate status at the whole-plant scale. The molecular mechanisms that participate in phosphate homeostasis include transcriptional control of gene expression, RNA silencing mediated by microRNAs, regulatory non-coding RNAs of miRNA activity, phosphate transporter trafficking, and post-translational modification of proteins, such as phosphorylation, sumoylation and ubiquitination. Such a varied regulatory repertoire reflects the complexity intrinsic to phosphate surveying and signaling pathways. Here, we describe these regulatory mechanisms, emphasizing the increasing importance of ubiquitination in the control of phosphate starvation responses.
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Proteomics identifies ubiquitin-proteasome targets and new roles for chromatin-remodeling in the Arabidopsis response to phosphate starvation.
J Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2013
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In order to identify new regulators of the phosphate (Pi) starvation signaling pathway in plants, we analyzed variation in the abundance of nuclear-enriched proteins isolated from Arabidopsis roots that depends on Pi supply. We used 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF techniques for proteome separation, visualization and relative protein abundance quantification and identification. Pi-controlled proteins identified in our analysis included components of the chromatin remodeling, DNA replication, and mRNA splicing machineries. In addition, by combining Pi starvation conditions with proteasome inhibitor treatments, we characterized the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, a major mechanism for targeted protein degradation in eukaryotes, in the control of the stability of Pi-responsive proteins. Among Pi-responsive proteins, the histone chaperone NAP1;2 was selected for further characterization, and was shown to display differential nucleo-cytoplasmic accumulation in response to Pi deprivation. We also found that mutants affecting three members of the NAP1 family accumulate lower Pi levels and display reduced expression of Pi starvation-inducible genes, reflecting a potential regulatory role for these chromatin-remodeling proteins in Pi homeostasis.
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Dissection of local and systemic transcriptional responses to phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis.
Plant J.
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2010
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Phosphate is a crucial and often limiting nutrient for plant growth. To obtain inorganic phosphate (P(i) ), which is very insoluble, and is heterogeneously distributed in the soil, plants have evolved a complex network of morphological and biochemical processes. These processes are controlled by a regulatory system triggered by P(i) concentration, not only present in the medium (external P(i) ), but also inside plant cells (internal P(i) ). A split-root assay was performed to mimic a heterogeneous environment, after which a transcriptomic analysis identified groups of genes either locally or systemically regulated by P(i) starvation at the transcriptional level. These groups revealed coordinated regulations for various functions associated with P(i) starvation (including P(i) uptake, P(i) recovery, lipid metabolism, and metal uptake), and distinct roles for members in gene families. Genetic tools and physiological analyses revealed that genes that are locally regulated appear to be modulated mostly by root development independently of the internal P(i) content. By contrast, internal P(i) was essential to promote the activation of systemic regulation. Reducing the flow of P(i) had no effect on the systemic response, suggesting that a secondary signal, independent of P(i) , could be involved in the response. Furthermore, our results display a direct role for the transcription factor PHR1, as genes systemically controlled by low P(i) have promoters enriched with P1BS motif (PHR1-binding sequences). These data detail various regulatory systems regarding P(i) starvation responses (systemic versus local, and internal versus external P(i) ), and provide tools to analyze and classify the effects of P(i) starvation on plant physiology.
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A central regulatory system largely controls transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2010
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Plants respond to different stresses by inducing or repressing transcription of partially overlapping sets of genes. In Arabidopsis, the PHR1 transcription factor (TF) has an important role in the control of phosphate (Pi) starvation stress responses. Using transcriptomic analysis of Pi starvation in phr1, and phr1 phr1-like (phl1) mutants and in wild type plants, we show that PHR1 in conjunction with PHL1 controls most transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation, regardless of the Pi starvation specificity of these responses. Induced genes are enriched in PHR1 binding sequences (P1BS) in their promoters, whereas repressed genes do not show such enrichment, suggesting that PHR1(-like) control of transcriptional repression responses is indirect. In agreement with this, transcriptomic analysis of a transgenic plant expressing PHR1 fused to the hormone ligand domain of the glucocorticoid receptor showed that PHR1 direct targets (i.e., displaying altered expression after GR:PHR1 activation by dexamethasone in the presence of cycloheximide) corresponded largely to Pi starvation-induced genes that are highly enriched in P1BS. A minimal promoter containing a multimerised P1BS recapitulates Pi starvation-specific responsiveness. Likewise, mutation of P1BS in the promoter of two Pi starvation-responsive genes impaired their responsiveness to Pi starvation, but not to other stress types. Phylogenetic footprinting confirmed the importance of P1BS and PHR1 in Pi starvation responsiveness and indicated that P1BS acts in concert with other cis motifs. All together, our data show that PHR1 and PHL1 are partially redundant TF acting as central integrators of Pi starvation responses, both specific and generic. In addition, they indicate that transcriptional repression responses are an integral part of adaptive responses to stress.
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Plant hormones and nutrient signaling.
Plant Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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Plants count on a wide variety of metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses to adapt their growth to variations in mineral nutrient availability. To react to such variations plants have evolved complex sensing and signaling mechanisms that allow them to monitor the external and internal concentration of each of these nutrients, both in absolute terms and also relatively to the status of other nutrients. Recent evidence has shown that hormones participate in the control of these regulatory networks. Conversely, mineral nutrient conditions influence hormone biosynthesis, further supporting close interrelation between hormonal stimuli and nutritional homeostasis. In this review, we summarize these evidences and analyze possible transcriptional correlations between hormonal and nutritional responses, as a means to further characterize the role of hormones in the response of plants to limiting nutrients in soil.
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NEMATIC: a Simple and Versatile Tool for the In Silico Analysis of Plant-Nematode Interactions.
Mol. Plant Pathol.
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Novel approaches for the control of agricultural damaging nematodes are sorely needed. Endoparasitic nematodes complete their life cycle within the root vascular cylinder inducing specialized feeding cells, giant cells for the root-knot, and syncytia for the cyst nematodes. Both nematodes hijack parts of the transduction cascades involved in developmental processes, or partially mimic the plant responses to other interactions with microorganisms, but molecular evidences of their differences and commonalities are still under study. Transcriptomics has been used to describe global expression profiles of their interaction with Arabidopsis, generating vast lists of differentially expressed genes. Although those results are available in public databases and publications, the information is scattered and difficult to handle. Here we present a quick, visual, user-friendly and easy handling spreadsheet tool called NEMATIC (NEMatode-Arabidopsis Transcriptomic Interaction Compendium; www.uclm.es/grupo/gbbmp/english/nematic.asp). It combines existing transcriptomic data for the interaction between Arabidopsis and plant-endoparasitic nematodes with data from different transcriptomic analysis regarding hormone and cell cycle regulation, development, different plant tissues, cell types and various biotic stresses. NEMATIC facilitates efficient in silico studies on plant-nematode biology allowing quick cross-comparisons to complex data sets and obtaining customized gene selections through sequential comparative and filtering steps. It includes gene functional classification and links to utilities from several databases. This data-mining spreadsheet will be valuable for the understanding of the molecular bases subjacent to feeding site formation by comparison to other plant systems, and for the selection of genes as potential tools for biotechnological control of nematodes as demonstrated in examples provided experimentally confirmed.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.