JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Characterization of cleaning and disinfecting tasks and product use among hospital occupations.
Am. J. Ind. Med.
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Healthcare workers have an elevated prevalence of asthma and related symptoms associated with the use of cleaning/disinfecting products. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize cleaning/disinfecting tasks and products used among hospital occupations.
Related JoVE Video
Exposure to volatile organic compounds in healthcare settings.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To identify and summarise volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure profiles of healthcare occupations.
Related JoVE Video
Indium lung disease.
Chest
PUBLISHED: 12-29-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Reports of pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and, more recently, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) in indium workers suggested that workplace exposure to indium compounds caused several different lung diseases.
Related JoVE Video
Correcting diacetyl concentrations from air samples collected with NIOSH method 2557.
J Occup Environ Hyg
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione), a diketone chemical used to impart a buttery taste in many flavoring mixtures, has been associated with bronchiolitis obliterans in several industrial settings. For workplace evaluations in 2000-2006, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) investigators used NIOSH Method 2557, a sampling and analytical method for airborne diacetyl utilizing carbon molecular sieve sorbent tubes. The method was subsequently suspected to progressively underestimate diacetyl concentrations with increasing sampling site humidity. Since underestimation of worker exposure may lead to overestimation of respiratory health risk in quantitative exposure-effect analyses, correction of the diacetyl concentrations previously reported with Method 2557 is essential. We studied the effects of humidity and sample storage duration on recovery of diacetyl from experimental air samples taken from a dynamically generated controlled test atmosphere that allowed control of diacetyl concentration, temperature, relative humidity, sampling duration, and sampling flow rate. Samples were analyzed with Method 2557, and results were compared with theoretical test atmosphere diacetyl concentration. After fitting nonlinear models to the experimental data, we found that absolute humidity, diacetyl concentration, and days of sample storage prior to extraction affected diacetyl recovery as did sampling flow rate to a much smaller extent. We derived a mathematical correction procedure to more accurately estimate historical workplace diacetyl concentration based on laboratory-reported concentrations of diacetyl using Method 2557, and sample site temperature and relative humidity (to calculate absolute humidity), as well as days of sample storage prior to extraction in the laboratory. With this correction procedure, quantitative risk assessment for diacetyl can proceed using corrected exposure levels for air samples previously collected and analyzed using NIOSH Method 2557 for airborne diacetyl.
Related JoVE Video
Evaluation of the Limulus amebocyte lysate and recombinant factor C assays for assessment of airborne endotoxin.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
As a potent inflammatory agent, endotoxin is a key analyte of interest for studies of lung ailments in domestic environments and occupational settings with organic dust. A relatively unexplored advance in endotoxin exposure assessment is the use of recombinant factor C (rFC) from the Limulus pathway in a fluorometric assay. In this study, we compared airborne endotoxin concentrations in laboratory- and field-collected parallel air samples using the kinetic Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay and the rFC assay. Air sampling was performed using paired Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) samplers, Button samplers, closed-face cassettes, and cyclone samplers. Field sampling was performed in 10 livestock production facilities, including those housing swine, chicken, turkey, dairy cows, cattle, and horses. Laboratory sampling was performed in exposure chambers using resuspended airborne dust collected in five livestock facilities. Paired samples were extracted in pyrogen-free water with 0.05% Tween 20 and analyzed using LAL and rFC assays. In 402 field sample pairs there was excellent agreement between endotoxin concentrations determined by LAL and rFC (r = 0.93; P < 0.0001). In 510 laboratory sample pairs there was also excellent agreement between the two assays (r = 0.86; P < 0.0001). Correlations for subgroups of facility or dust type ranged from 0.65 to 0.96. Mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the field studies showed significant interactions of facility-sampler and facility-assay. rFC/LAL ratios of the geometric means were 0.9 to 1.14 for the samplers (not significantly different from 1.0). The data from this study demonstrate that the LAL assay and the rFC assay return similar estimates of exposure in livestock facilities. Both methods provided suitable lower limits of detection such that all but 19 of 1,824 samples were quantifiable.
Related JoVE Video
Muramic acid, endotoxin, 3-hydroxy fatty acids, and ergosterol content explain monocyte and epithelial cell inflammatory responses to agricultural dusts.
J. Toxicol. Environ. Health Part A
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In agricultural and other environments, inhalation of airborne microorganisms is linked to respiratory disease development. Bacterial endotoxins, peptidoglycans, and fungi are potential causative agents, but relative microbial characterization and inflammatory comparisons amongst agricultural dusts are not well described. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of microbial endotoxin, 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OHFA), muramic acid, and ergosterol and evaluate inflammatory responses in human monocytes and bronchial epithelial cells with various dust samples. Settled surface dust was obtained from five environments: swine facility, dairy barn, grain elevator, domestic home (no pets), and domestic home with dog. Endotoxin concentration was determined by recombinant factor C (rFC). 3-OHFA, muramic acid, and ergosterol were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dust-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion in human monocytes and bronchial epithelial cells was evaluated. Endotoxin-independent dust-induced inflammatory responses were evaluated. Endotoxin and 3-OHFA levels were highest in agricultural dusts. Muramic acid, endotoxin, 3-OHFA, and ergosterol were detected in dusts samples. Muramic acid was highest in animal farming dusts. Ergosterol was most significant in grain elevator dust. Agricultural dusts induced monocyte tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and epithelial cell IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Monocyte and epithelial IL-6 and IL-8 secretion was not dependent on endotoxin. House dust(s) induced monocyte TNFalpha, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion. Swine facility dust generally produced elevated responses compared to other dusts. Agricultural dusts are complex with significant microbial component contribution. Large animal farming dust(s)-induced inflammation is not entirely dependent on endotoxin. Addition of muramic acid to endotoxin in large animal farming environment monitoring is warranted.
Related JoVE Video
Recombinant factor C (rFC) assay and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of endotoxin variability in four agricultural dusts.
Ann Occup Hyg
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Endotoxin exposure is a significant concern in agricultural environments due to relatively high exposure levels. The goals of this study were to determine patterns of 3-hydroxy fatty acid (3-OHFA) distribution in dusts from four types of agricultural environments (dairy, cattle feedlot, grain elevator, and corn farm) and to evaluate correlations between the results of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis (total endotoxin) and biological recombinant factor C (rFC) assay (free bioactive endotoxin). An existing GC/MS-MS method (for house dust) was modified to reduce sample handling and optimized for small amount (<1 mg) of agricultural dusts using GC/EI-MS. A total of 134 breathing zone samples using Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable samplers were collected from agricultural workers in Colorado and Nebraska. Livestock dusts contained approximately two times higher concentrations of 3-OHFAs than grain dusts. Patterns of 3-OHFA distribution and proportion of each individual 3-OHFA varied by dust type. The rank order of Pearson correlations between the biological rFC assay and the modified GC/EI-MS results was feedlot (0.72) > dairy (0.53) > corn farm (0.33) > grain elevator (0.11). In livestock environments, both odd- and even-numbered carbon chain length 3-OHFAs correlated with rFC assay response. The GC/EI-MS method should be especially useful for identification of specific 3-OHFAs for endotoxins from various agricultural environments and may provide useful information for evaluating the relationship between bacterial exposure and respiratory disease among agricultural workers.
Related JoVE Video
Serial evaluations at an indium-tin oxide production facility.
Am. J. Ind. Med.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We evaluated the effectiveness of workplace changes to prevent indium lung disease, using 2002-2010 surveillance data collected by an indium-tin oxide production facility.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.