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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The relevance of testing the efficacy of anti-angiogenesis treatments on cells derived from primary tumors: a new method for the personalized treatment of renal cell carcinoma.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Despite the numerous available drugs, the most appropriate treatments for patients affected by common or rare renal cell carcinomas (RCC), like those associated with the Xp11.2 translocation/transcription factor for immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (TFE3 RCC), are not clearly defined. We aimed to make a parallel between the sensitivity to targeted therapies on living patients and on cells derived from the initial tumor. Three patients diagnosed with a metastatic RCC (one clear cell RCC [ccRCC], two TFE3 RCC) were treated with anti-angiogenesis drugs. The concentrations of the different drugs giving 50% inhibition of cell proliferation (IC50) were determined with the Thiazolyl Blue Tetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay on cells from the primary tumors and a reference sensitive RCC cell line (786-O). We considered the cells to be sensitive if the IC50 was lower or equal to that in 786-O cells, and insensitive if the IC50 was higher to that in 786-O cells (IC 50 of 6 ± 1 µM for sunitinib, 10 ± 1 µM for everolimus and 6 ± 1 µM for sorafenib). Based on this standard, the response in patients and in cells was equivalent. The efficacy of anti-angiogenesis therapies was also tested in cells obtained from five patients with non-metastatic ccRCC, and untreated as recommended by clinical practice in order to determine the best treatment in case of progression toward a metastatic grade. In vitro experiments may represent a method for evaluating the best first-line treatment for personalized management of ccRCC during the period following surgery.
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The ELR(+)CXCL chemokines and their receptors CXCR1/CXCR2: A signaling axis and new target for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.
Oncoimmunology
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The long-term efficacy of anti-angiogenesis drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptors in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been lacking. We have shown that the ELR(+)CXCL cytokines and their (C-X-C) chemokine receptors, namely CXCR1 and CXCR2, stimulate cancer cell proliferation, tumor inflammation, and angiogenesis. Hence, this essential molecular nexus regulating cancer growth represents a key therapeutic target.
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The CXCL7/CXCR1/2 axis is a key driver in the growth of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-12-2013
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Mutations in the VHL upregulate expression of the central angiogenic factor VEGF which drives abnormal angiogenesis in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). However, the overexpression of VEGF in these tumors was not found to correlate with overall survival. Here we show that the pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory cytokine CXCL7 is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in this setting. CXCL7 antibodies strongly reduced the growth of ccRCC tumors in nude mice. Conversely, conditional overexpression of CXCL7 accelerated ccRCC development. CXCL7 promoted cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro, where expression of CXCL7 was induced by the central pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1ß. ccRCC cells normally secrete low amounts of CXCL7, it was more highly expressed in tumors due high levels of IL-1ß there. We found that a pharmacological inhibitor of the CXCL7 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 (SB225002) was sufficient to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and ccRCC growth. Because CXCR1 and CXCR2 are present on both endothelial and ccRCC cells, their inhibition affected both the tumor vasculature and the proliferation of tumor cells. Our results highlight the CXCL7/CXCR1/CXCR2 axis as a pertinent target for the treatment of ccRCC.
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Constitutive ERK activity induces downregulation of tristetraprolin, a major protein controlling interleukin8/CXCL8 mRNA stability in melanoma cells.
Am. J. Physiol., Cell Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2011
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Most melanoma cells are characterized by the V600E mutation in B-Raf kinase. This mutation leads to increased expression of interleukin (CXCL8), which plays a key role in cell growth and angiogenesis. Thus CXCL8 appears to be an interesting therapeutic target. Hence, we performed vaccination of mice with GST-CXCL8, which results in a reduced incidence of syngenic B16 melanoma cell xenograft tumors. We next addressed the molecular mechanisms responsible for aberrant CXCL8 expression in melanoma. The CXCL8 mRNA contains multiples AU-rich sequences (AREs) that modulate mRNA stability through the binding of tristetraprolin (TTP). Melanoma cell lines express very low TTP levels. We therefore hypothesized that the very low endogenous levels of TTP present in different melanoma cell lines might be responsible for the relative stability of CXCL8 mRNAs. We show that TTP is actively degraded by the proteasome and that extracellular-regulated kinase inhibition results in TTP accumulation. Conditional expression of TTP in A375 melanoma cells leads to CXCL8 mRNA destabilization via its 3 untranslated regions (3-UTR), and TTP overexpression reduces its production. In contrast, downregulation of TTP by short hairpin RNA results in upregulation of CXCL8 mRNA. Maintaining high TTP levels in melanoma cells decreases cell proliferation and autophagy and induces apoptosis. Sorafenib, a therapeutic agent targeting Raf kinases, decreases CXCL8 expression in melanoma cells through reexpression of TTP. We conclude that loss of TTP represents a key event in the establishment of melanomas through constitutive expression of CXCL8, which constitutes a potent therapeutic target.
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Molecular mechanisms of resistance to tumour anti-angiogenic strategies.
J Oncol
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2010
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Tumour angiogenesis, described by Folkman in the early seventies, is an essential, complex, and dynamic process necessary for the growth of all solid tumours. Among the angiogenic factors secreted by the tumour cells, the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is one of the most important. Most types of human cancer cells express elevated levels of this proangiogenic factor and its receptors. New molecules, called anti-angiogenic, are developed to impair VEGF pathway and tumour vasculature. Despite important results, the clinical benefits of anti-VEGF therapy are relatively modest and usually measured in weeks or months. Why following anti-angiogenic therapy do some patients respond transiently and then why does tumour grow again and disease progress and which compensatory mechanisms could explain the anti-angiogenic treatment failure?
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[The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): a model of gene regulation and a marker of tumour aggressiveness. An obvious therapeutic target?].
J. Soc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2009
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VEGF represents a model of gene expression regulation. RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PI3 Kinase pathways, activated in response to growth factors stimulation or by oncogenes, contribute to its expression by activating transcription factors or inactivating proteins implicated in degradation of its mRNA. These factors (Sp1/Sp3, HIF-1 and TTP) constitute molecular markers of tumor aggressiveness. VEGF is overexpressed in solid or hematologic tumors. Thus, numerous compounds regulating angiogenesis by targeting VEGF have been developed. However, their effects are not as spectacular as expected. The existence of anti-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF could be a cause of their less potent activity. These different points are discussed in this review article.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.