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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Using patients' experiences of adverse events to improve health service delivery and practice: protocol of a data linkage study of Australian adults age 45 and above.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2014
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Evidence of patients' experiences is fundamental to creating effective health policy and service responses, yet is missing from our knowledge of adverse events. This protocol describes explorative research redressing this significant deficit; investigating the experiences of a large cohort of recently hospitalised patients aged 45 years and above in hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia.
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Creating spaces in intensive care for safe communication: a video-reflexive ethnographic study.
BMJ Qual Saf
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2014
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The built environment in acute care settings is a new focus in patient safety research, with few studies focusing primarily on the design of ward environments and the location and choice of material objects such as light fittings and hand-washing basins.
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Clinical utility of an observation and response chart with human factors design characteristics and a track and trigger system: study protocol for a two-phase multisite multiple-methods design.
JMIR Res Protoc
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2014
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Clinical deterioration of adult patients in acute medical-surgical wards continues to occur, despite a range of systems and processes designed to minimize this risk. In Australia, a standardized template for adult observation charts using human factors design principles and decision-support characteristics was developed to improve the detection of and response to abnormal vital signs.
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Rural patients' experiences of the open disclosure of adverse events.
Aust J Rural Health
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2014
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To analyse rural patients' and their families' experiences of open disclosure and offer recommendations to improve disclosure in rural areas.
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Disclosing Adverse Events to Patients: International Norms and Trends.
J Patient Saf
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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There is a growing expectation in health systems around the world that patients will be fully informed when adverse events occur. However, current disclosure practices often fall short of this expectation.
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Hospital quality improvement initiative for patients with acute coronary syndromes in China: a cluster randomized, controlled trial.
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Background- Substantial evidence-practice gaps exist in the management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in China. Clinical pathways are tools for improving ACS quality of care but have not been rigorously evaluated. Methods and Results- Between October 2007 and August 2010, a quality improvement program was conducted in 75 hospitals throughout China with mixed methods evaluation in a cluster randomized, controlled trial. Eligible hospitals were level 2 or level 3 centers routinely admitting >100 patients with ACS per year. Hospitals were assigned immediate implementation of the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guideline based clinical pathways or commencement of the intervention 12 months later. Outcomes were several key performance indicators reflecting the management of ACS. The key performance indicators were measured 12 months after commencement in intervention hospitals and compared with baseline data in control hospitals, using data collected from 50 consecutive patients in each hospital. Pathway implementation was associated with an increased proportion of patients discharged on appropriate medical therapy, with nonsignificant improvements or absence of effects on other key performance indicators. Conclusions- Among hospitals in China, the use of a clinical pathway for the treatment of ACS compared with usual care improved secondary prevention treatments, but effectiveness was otherwise limited. An accompanying process evaluation identified several health system barriers to more successful implementation. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/default.aspx. Unique identifier: ACTRN12609000491268.
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System barriers to the evidence-based care of acute coronary syndrome patients in China: qualitative analysis.
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Organizational and wider health system factors influence the implementation and success of interventions. Clinical Pathways in Acute Coronary Syndromes 2 is a cluster randomized trial of a clinical pathway-based intervention to improve acute coronary syndrome care in hospitals in China. We performed a qualitative evaluation to examine the system-level barriers to implementing clinical pathways in the dynamic healthcare environment of China.
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Out of the frying pan? Streamlining the ethics review process of multisite qualitative research projects.
Aust Health Rev
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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This paper describes the ethics approval processes for two multicentre, nationwide, qualitative health service research projects. The paper explains that the advent of the National Ethics Application Form has brought many improvements, but that attendant processes put in place at local health network and Human Research Ethics Committee levels may have become significantly more complicated, particularly for innovative qualitative research projects. The paper raises several questions based on its analysis of ethics application processes currently in place. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? The complexity of multicentre research ethics applications for research in health services has been addressed by the introduction of the National Ethics Application Form. Uptake of the form across the countrys human research ethics committees has been uneven. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper adds detailed insight into the ethics application process as it is currently enacted across the country. The paper details this process with reference to difficulties faced by multisite and qualitative studies in negotiating access to research sites, ethics committees relative unfamiliarity with qualitative research , and apparent tensions between harmonisation and local sites autonomy in approving research. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? Practitioners aiming to engage in research need to be aware that ethics approval takes place in an uneven procedural landscape, made up of variable levels of ethics approval harmonization and intricate governance or site-specific assessment processes.
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The contribution of nurses to incident disclosure: A narrative review.
Int J Nurs Stud
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2013
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To explore (a) how nurses feel about disclosing patient safety incidents to patients, (b) the current contribution that nurses make to the process of disclosing patient safety incidents to patients and (c) the barriers that nurses report as inhibiting their involvement in disclosure.
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Should culture affect practice? A comparison of prognostic discussions in consultations with immigrant versus native-born cancer patients.
Patient Educ Couns
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Poor prognosis is difficult to impart, particularly across a cultural divide. This study compared prognostic communication with immigrants (with and without interpreters) versus native-born patients in audio-taped oncology consultations.
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Finding the patient in patient safety.
Health (London)
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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In the last decade, the field of patient safety has grappled with the complexity of health-care systems by attending to the activity of frontline clinicians. This article extends the field by highlighting the activity of patients and their carers in determining the safety of these systems. We draw on data from three studies exploring patients accounts of their health-care experiences in Australia and internationally, to show how patients and carers are currently contributing to the safety of their own care. Furthermore, we emphasise the importance of patient-clinician collaboration in ensuring the success of these activities. We argue that it is no longer sufficient to discuss if patients should be involved with ensuring their own safety. Given that patients are already involved, we propose a new conceptualisation of safety and systems that acknowledges their involvement and supports patient-provider collaboration to achieve safer care.
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What do patients and relatives know about problems and failures in care?
BMJ Qual Saf
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2011
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To understand what patients and family members know about problems and failures in healthcare.
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What prevents incident disclosure, and what can be done to promote it?
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2011
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Adverse-event incident disclosure is gaining international attention as being central to incident management, practice improvement, and public engagement, but those charged with its execution are experiencing barriers. Findings have emerged from two large studies: an evaluation of the 2006-2008 Australian Open Disclosure Pilot, and a 2009-2010 study of patients and relatives views on actual disclosures. Clinicians and patients interviewed in depth suggest that open disclosure communication has been prevented by a range of uncertainties, fears, and doubts.
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Patients and family members views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study.
BMJ
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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To investigate patients and family members perceptions and experiences of disclosure of healthcare incidents and to derive principles of effective disclosure.
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End-of-life care in an acute care hospital: linking policy and practice.
Death Stud
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2011
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The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be effective, health care professionals who provide hospital care will need to respond to its patient-centered purpose. Health services will also be called upon to train health care professionals to work with dying people in a more participatory way and to assist them to develop the clinical processes that support shared decision making. Health professionals who manage clinical workplaces become central in reshaping this practice environment by promoting patient-centered care policy objectives and restructuring health service systems to routinely incorporate patient and family preferences about care at key points in the patients care episode.
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Bedside review of patient care in an emergency department: The Cow Round.
Emerg Med Australas
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Clinical handover is a critical point in medical care in the ED, which can contribute to adverse effects for patient care and staff workloads. Over a 4 and a half months in a tertiary referral hospital ED, a centralized whiteboard handover was performed followed by a multidisciplinary review of each patient. This round was referred to as the Cow Round.
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Interpretation in consultations with immigrant patients with cancer: how accurate is it?
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2011
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Immigrants with cancer often have professional and/or family interpreters to overcome challenges communicating with their health team. This study explored the rate and consequences of nonequivalent interpretation in medical oncology consultations.
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Creating safety by strengthening clinicians capacity for reflexivity.
BMJ Qual Saf
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2011
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This commentary explores the nature of creating safety in the here-and-now. Creating safety encompasses two dimensions: revisiting specific behaviours by focusing on substandard performance (reflection), and a more broad-ranging attention to everyday behaviours that are taken as given (reflexivity). The piece pays particular attention to this second dimension of creating safety. Two techniques that promote reflexivity are discussed: video-filming real-time, everyday clinical practice and inviting clinicians feedback about their own footage, and reflecting on the knowledge and questions that patients and families have about their care, and about unexpected outcomes and clinical incidents. The piece concludes that feedback about everyday practice using these methods is critical to enhancing the safety of everyday activity.
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Grappling with cultural differences; communication between oncologists and immigrant cancer patients with and without interpreters.
Patient Educ Couns
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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Immigrants report challenges communicating with their health team. This study compared oncology consultations of immigrants with and without interpreters vs Anglo-Australian patients.
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Hands on, Hands off: a model of clinical supervision that recognises trainees need for support and independence.
Aust Health Rev
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2010
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This article presents a study of junior doctor supervision at a rural hospital. The objective of the present study was to gain insight into the types of supervision events experienced, the quality of supervisory relationships, the frequencies of supervision contact in a rural hospital setting, and the implications of these factors for supervision practice.
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Accounting for health-care outcomes: implications for intensive care unit practice and performance.
Health Serv Manage Res
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2010
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The aim of this study was to understand the environment of health care, and how clinicians and managers respond in terms of performance accountability. A qualitative method was used in a tertiary metropolitan teaching intensive care unit (ICU) in Sydney, Australia, including interviews with 15 clinical managers and focus groups with 29 nurses of differing experience. The study found that a managerial focus on abstract goals, such as budgets detracted from managing the core business of clinical work. Fractures were evident within clinical units, between clinical units and between clinical and managerial domains. These fractures reinforced the status quo where seemingly unconnected patient care activities were undertaken by loosely connected individual clinicians with personalized concepts of accountability. Managers must conceptualize health services as an interconnected entity within which self-directed teams negotiate and agree objectives, collect and review performance data and define collective practice. Organically developing regimens of care within and across specialist clinical units, such as in ICUs, directly impact upon health service performance and accountability.
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Patient perceptions of carrying their own health information: approaches towards responsibility and playing an active role in their own health - implications for a patient-held health file.
Health Expect
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2010
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To elicit patients views on whether they could contribute to improvements in their care by carrying their own health information to clinician encounters; and to consider the implications for the development of a patient-held health file (PHF).
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Multiple accountabilities in incident reporting and management.
Qual Health Res
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2010
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In this article, we examine the current and increasing emphasis on accountability and patient safety in health care, focusing on practices of incident reporting and management in New South Wales, Australia. We describe the frames of accountability associated with an incident reporting system, and explore how this system manifests in practice. In contrast to literature that situates incident reporting and local practices as oppositional, we used ethnographic methods to observe the incident management practices of clinical staff in a hospital, and found evidence to characterize this relationship differently. We found that accountability has multiple conceptualizations, and we present three findings that demonstrate how the reporting system and incident management policy are interwoven with local enactments of accountability. We suggest that systematic efforts toward improvement cannot be divorced from the local context, and emphasize the importance of local ecologies of practice in facilitating the meaningful utilization of such incident reporting systems.
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The relationship between birth unit design and safe, satisfying birth: developing a hypothetical model.
Midwifery
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2010
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Recent advances in cross-disciplinary studies linking architecture and neuroscience have revealed that much of the built environment for health-care delivery may actually impair rather than improve health outcomes by disrupting effective communication and increasing patient and staff stress. This is also true for maternity care provision, where it is suggested that the design of the environment can also impact on the experiences and outcomes for birthing women. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a conceptual model based on literature and understandings of design, communication, stress and model of care. The model explores potential relationships among a set of key variables that need to be considered by researchers wishing to determine the characteristics of optimal birth environments in relation to birth outcomes for women and infants. The conceptual model hypothesises that safe satisfying birth is reliant on the level of stress experienced by a woman and the staff around her, stress influences the quality of communication with women and between staff, and this process is mediated by the design of the birth unit and model of care. The conceptual model is offered as a starting point for researchers who have an appreciation of the complexity of birth and the ability to bring together colleagues from a range of disciplines to explore the pre-requisites for safe and effective maternity care in new ways.
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Legal aspects of open disclosure II: attitudes of health professionals - findings from a national survey.
Med. J. Aust.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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To assess the attitudes of health care professionals engaged in open disclosure (OD) to the legal risks and protections that surround this activity.
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Affect is central to patient safety: the horror stories of young anaesthetists.
Soc Sci Med
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2009
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This paper analyses talk produced by twenty-four newly qualified anaesthetists. Data were collected from round table discussions at the Young Fellows Conference of the Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists 2006. The talk consisted to an important extent of narratives about experiences of horror. The paper isolates three themes: the normalization of horror, the functionalisation of horror for pedagogic purposes, and the problematization of horror. The last theme provides a springboard into our argument that confronting the affect invested in coping with medical-clinical failure is central to enabling young doctors, and clinicians generally, to address and resolve such adverse events. We conclude that the negotiation of affect through shared or dialogic narrative is central to enabling doctors to deal with adverse events on a personal level, and to enabling them at a collective level to become attentive to threats to patients safety.
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Disclosing clinical adverse events to patients: can practice inform policy?
Health Expect
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2009
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To understand patients and health professionals experience of Open Disclosure and how practice can inform policy.
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New approaches to researching patient safety.
Soc Sci Med
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2009
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This article presents an overview of contemporary research into patient safety. The article suggests that patient safety research to date has tended to privilege the formal and structural dimensions of safety at the expense of the social and affective dimensions of safety. The article previews the research articles brought together in this special issue of Social Science & Medicine, paying particular attention to the impact of these studies on the field of patient safety research generally. The present article summarises this impact in the form of the following three patient safety research principles. First, to account for whether and how safe and improvement-oriented practice is achieved, research must engage with both the predictability and the complexity of the sites and processes it seeks to describe, explain and/or impact on. Second, engaging with complexity implicates researchers in experiencing it, and this implicates the research process and its methodology in a process of sense-making of the practical and affective consequences for and with practitioners inhabiting and enacting that complexity. Third, besides numerically-based descriptions, abstracted explanations and procedural prescriptions, patient safety research evidence must encompass experiential data, collaboratively-produced accounts and/or experience-based designs.
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Handover--Enabling Learning in Communication for Safety (HELiCS): a report on achievements at two hospital sites.
Med. J. Aust.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2009
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Clinical handover is an area of critical concern, because deficiencies in handover pose a patient safety risk. Redesign of handover must allow for input from frontline staff to ensure that designs fit into existing practices and settings. The HELiCS (Handover--Enabling Learning in Communication for Safety) tool uses a "video-reflexive" technique: handover encounters are videotaped and played back to the practitioners involved for analysis and discussion. Using the video-reflexive process, staff of an emergency department and an intensive care unit at two different tertiary hospitals redesigned their handover processes. The HELiCS study gave staff greater insight into previously unrecognised clinical and operational problems, enhanced coordination and efficiency of care, and strengthened junior-senior communication and teaching. Our study showed that reflexive and "bottom-up" handover redesign can produce outcomes that harbour local fit, practitioner ownership and (to date) sustainability.
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Emotional labour: clinicians attitudes to death and dying.
J Health Organ Manag
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2009
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This paper aims to understand the impact of emotional labour in specific health care settings and its potential effect on patient care.
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Practising Open Disclosure: clinical incident communication and systems improvement.
Sociol Health Illn
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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This article explores the way that professionals are being inducted into articulating apologies to consumers of their services, in this case clinicians apologising to patients. The article focuses on the policy of Open Disclosure that is being adopted by health care organisations in the US, Canada, the UK and Australia and other nations. Open Disclosure policy mandates open discussion of clinical incidents with patient victims. In Australia, Open Disclosure policy implementation is currently being complemented by intensive staff training, involving simulation of apology scenarios with actor-patients. The article presents an analysis of data collected from such training sessions. The analysis shows how simulated apologising engages frontline staff in evaluating the efficacy of their disclosures, and how staff may thereby be inducted into reconciling their affective and reflexive sensibilities with their organisational and professional responsibilities, and thereby produce the required organisational apology. The article concludes that Open Disclosure, besides potentially relaxing tensions between clinicians and consumers, may also affect how staff experience and enact their role in the overall system of health care organisation.
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Utilizing experience-based co-design to improve the experience of patients accessing emergency departments in New South Wales public hospitals: an evaluation study.
Health Serv Manage Res
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This paper presents the findings of three multisite evaluations of Experience-Based Co-design (EBCD) programmes conducted in Emergency Departments (EDs) and associated departments in seven public hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.
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Anatomy of an incident disclosure: the importance of dialogue.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
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Disclosure of health care incidents to patients and family members, as an ethical imperative, is becoming increasingly prevalent. The experiences of a woman whose husband died forms the basis for a case study of how she and her family and friends were able to renegotiate clinicians understandings of what had gone wrong and influence their views of what needed to be done in response.
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Mobile IT solutions for home health care.
Adv Health Care Manag
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Harnessing the advantage of mobile information technology (IT) solutions at the point of care and contributing to patients safety by involving them.
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Design and trial of a new ambulance-to-emergency department handover protocol: IMIST-AMBO.
BMJ Qual Saf
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Information communicated by ambulance paramedics to Emergency Department (ED) staff during handover of patients has been found to be inconsistent and incomplete, and yet has major implications for patients subsequent hospital treatment and trajectory of care.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.