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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Histone deacetylase inhibition increases levels of choline kinase ? and phosphocholine facilitating noninvasive imaging in human cancers.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2011
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Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are currently approved for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and are in mid-late stage trials for other cancers. The HDAC inhibitors LAQ824 and SAHA increase phosphocholine (PC) levels in human colon cancer cells and tumor xenografts as observed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In this study, we show that belinostat, an HDAC inhibitor with an alternative chemical scaffold, also caused a rise in cellular PC content that was detectable by (1)H and (31)P MRS in prostate and colon carcinoma cells. In addition, (1)H MRS showed an increase in branched chain amino acid and alanine concentrations. (13)C-choline labeling indicated that the rise in PC resulted from increased de novo synthesis and correlated with an induction of choline kinase ? expression. Furthermore, metabolic labeling experiments with (13)C-glucose showed that differential glucose routing favored alanine formation at the expense of lactate production. Additional analysis revealed increases in the choline/water and phosphomonoester (including PC)/total phosphate ratios in vivo. Together, our findings provide mechanistic insights into the impact of HDAC inhibition on cancer cell metabolism and highlight PC as a candidate noninvasive imaging biomarker for monitoring the action of HDAC inhibitors.
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Correlation of overall survival with gene expression profiles in a prospective study of resectable esophageal cancer.
Clin Colorectal Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2011
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Preoperative chemotherapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with potentially resectable esophageal cancer; however, currently it is not possible to predict the benefit of this treatment for an individual patient. This prospective study was designed to correlate gene expression profiles with clinical outcome in this setting.
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Molecular pharmacology of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition in human glioma.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2009
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Gliomas are primary brain tumors with poor prognosis that exhibit frequent abnormalities in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 kinase) signaling. We investigated the molecular mechanism of action of the isoform-selective class I PI3 kinase and mTOR inhibitor PI-103 in human glioma cells. The potent inhibitory effects of PI-103 on the PI3 kinase pathway were quantified. PI-103 and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin both inhibited ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation but there were clear differences in the response of upstream components of the PI3 kinase pathway, such as phosphorylation of Thr(308)-AKT, that were inhibited by PI-103 but not rapamycin. Gene expression profiling identified altered expression of genes encoding regulators of the cell cycle and cholesterol metabolism, and genes modulated by insulin or IGF1 signaling, rapamycin treatment or nutrient starvation. PI-103 decreased expression of positive regulators of G(1)/S phase progression and increased expression of the negative cell cycle regulator p27(kip1). A reversible PI-103-mediated G(1) cell cycle arrest occurred without significant apoptosis, consistent with the altered gene expression detected. PI-103 induced vacuolation and processing of LC-3i to LC-3ii, which are features of an autophagic response. In contrast to PI-103, LY294002 and PI-387 induced apoptosis, indicative of likely off-target effects. PI-103 interacted synergistically or additively with cytotoxic agents used in the treatment of glioma, namely vincristine, BCNU and temozolomide. Compared to individual treatments, the combination of PI-103 with temozolomide significantly improved the response of U87MG human glioma xenografts. Our results support the therapeutic potential for PI3 kinase inhibitors with a PI-103-like profile as therapeutic agents for the treatment of glioma.
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AT13148 is a novel, oral multi-AGC kinase inhibitor with potent pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity.
Clin. Cancer Res.
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Deregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway signaling through AGC kinases including AKT, p70S6 kinase, PKA, SGK and Rho kinase is a key driver of multiple cancers. The simultaneous inhibition of multiple AGC kinases may increase antitumor activity and minimize clinical resistance compared with a single pathway component.
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Mechanism-based screen for G1/S checkpoint activators identifies a selective activator of EIF2AK3/PERK signalling.
PLoS ONE
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Human cancers often contain genetic alterations that disable G1/S checkpoint control and loss of this checkpoint is thought to critically contribute to cancer generation by permitting inappropriate proliferation and distorting fate-driven cell cycle exit. The identification of cell permeable small molecules that activate the G1/S checkpoint may therefore represent a broadly applicable and clinically effective strategy for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the identification of several novel small molecules that trigger G1/S checkpoint activation and characterise the mechanism of action for one, CCT020312, in detail. Transcriptional profiling by cDNA microarray combined with reverse genetics revealed phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (EIF2A) through the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha kinase 3 (EIF2AK3/PERK) as the mechanism of action of this compound. While EIF2AK3/PERK activation classically follows endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signalling that sets off a range of different cellular responses, CCT020312 does not trigger these other cellular responses but instead selectively elicits EIF2AK3/PERK signalling. Phosphorylation of EIF2A by EIF2A kinases is a known means to block protein translation and hence restriction point transit in G1, but further supports apoptosis in specific contexts. Significantly, EIF2AK3/PERK signalling has previously been linked to the resistance of cancer cells to multiple anticancer chemotherapeutic agents, including drugs that target the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and taxanes. Consistent with such findings CCT020312 sensitizes cancer cells with defective taxane-induced EIF2A phosphorylation to paclitaxel treatment. Our work therefore identifies CCT020312 as a novel small molecule chemical tool for the selective activation of EIF2A-mediated translation control with utility for proof-of-concept applications in EIF2A-centered therapeutic approaches, and as a chemical starting point for pathway selective agent development. We demonstrate that consistent with its mode of action CCT020312 is capable of delivering potent, and EIF2AK3 selective, proliferation control and can act as a sensitizer to chemotherapy-associated stresses as elicited by taxanes.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.