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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Single-agent tenofovir versus combination emtricitabine plus tenofovir for pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 acquisition: an update of data from a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial.
Lancet Infect Dis
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2014
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Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), with daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in combination with emtricitabine, has been shown to be efficacious for HIV-1 prevention. Although the use of more than one antiretroviral agent is essential for effective HIV-1 treatment, more than one agent might not be required for effective prophylaxis. We assessed the efficacy of single-agent tenofovir disoproxil fumarate relative to combination emtricitabine plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate as PrEP.
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Sevelamer Does Not Decrease Lipopolysaccharide or Soluble CD14 Levels But Decreases Soluble Tissue Factor, Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol, and Oxidized LDL Cholesterol Levels in Individuals With Untreated HIV Infection.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2014
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Abnormal levels of inflammation are associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Microbial translocation, which may cause inflammation, is decreased by sevelamer in patients undergoing hemodialysis. In this single-arm study, we evaluated the effects of 8 weeks of sevelamer therapy on 36 HIV-infected subjects who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Sevelamer did not significantly change markers of microbial translocation, inflammation, or T-cell activation. During sevelamer treatment, however, levels of soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and oxidized LDL cholesterol decreased significantly, whereas D-dimer levels increased. Thus, in this study population, sevelamer did not reduce microbial translocation but may have yielded cardiovascular benefits.
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Vasculitis as Part of the Fetal Response to Acute Chorioamnionitis Likely Plays a Role in the Development of Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Spontaneous Intestinal Perforation in Premature Neonates.
Eur J Pediatr Surg
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2014
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Background?Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) are causes of bowel perforation in premature neonates. Studies have demonstrated that both are associated with acute chorioamnionitis (ACA) of the placenta. Aim?The aim of our study was to identify any histopathological links between placental histopathological abnormalities and the later development of NEC and/or SIP in premature patients presenting at our institution. Patients and Methods?Cases with a diagnosis of NEC/SIP were identified. Entry criteria were the diagnosis of NEC/SIP was confirmed clinically and/or histologically, had been made within the first 7 days of life, neonates were premature, and the placenta had been submitted for histological examination. In those cases with ACA, CD34 immunohistochemistry and Martius scarlet blue staining was performed. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, clinical variables, and clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher exact test. Results?In total, 21 cases met defined inclusion criteria (12 NEC, 8 SIP, and 1 clinically indeterminate). Mean gestational age was 27 weeks. Median age of presentation was 5 days. Placental histology showed ACA in 16 of 21 cases (76.2%). Of those with ACA, 13 of 16 (81.3%) had umbilical phlebitis, 12 of 16 (75.0%) had umbilical arteritis, 6 of 16 (37.5%) funisitis, and 12 of 16 (75.0%) had chorionic vasculitis. No differences (p?>?0.05) were seen between ACA and diagnosis or clinical outcome (Fisher exact test). Of the 16 cases, 14 with ACA that later developed either NEC or SIP showed vasculitis in the umbilical cord and/or chorionic plate and/or stem villi vasculature. The association between ACA and vasculitis was highly significant (p?
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HIV-1 RNA levels and antiretroviral drug resistance in blood and non-blood compartments from HIV-1-infected men and women enrolled in AIDS clinical trials group study A5077.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Detectable HIV-1 in body compartments can lead to transmission and antiretroviral resistance. Although sex differences in viral shedding have been demonstrated, mechanisms and magnitude are unclear. We compared RNA levels in blood, genital-secretions and saliva; and drug resistance in plasma and genital-secretions of men and women starting/changing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) 5077 study.
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Improving diagnostic capability for HPV disease internationally within the NIH-NIAID Division of AIDS Clinical Trial Networks.
Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2013
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To evaluate an external quality assurance (EQA) program for the laboratory diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease that was established to improve international research capability within the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease-supported Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group network.
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Relative accuracy of serum, whole blood, and oral fluid HIV tests among Seattle men who have sex with men.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2013
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Point-of-care (POC) rapid HIV tests have sensitivity during the "window period" comparable only to earliest generation EIAs. To date, it is unclear whether any POC test performs significantly better than others.
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Clinical performance of the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test to correctly differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection in screening algorithms using third and fourth generation assays and to identify cross reactivity with the HIV-1 Western Blot.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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An accurate and rapid serologic method to differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection is required since the confirmatory HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) may demonstrate cross-reactivity with HIV-2 antibodies.
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Performance of an alternative HIV diagnostic algorithm using the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and potential utility of sample-to-cutoff ratio to discriminate primary from established infection.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2013
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The ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay has a wide dynamic range for determining the sample-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) values compared to other diagnostic HIV antibody assays.
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Finding those at risk: Acute HIV infection in Newark, NJ.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2013
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A screening strategy combining rapid HIV-1/2 (HIV) antibody testing with pooled HIV-1 RNA testing increases identification of HIV infections, but may have other limitations that restrict its usefulness to all but the highest incidence populations.
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Changes in HIV-1 subtypes B and C genital tract RNA in women and men after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) reduces genital tract human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) load and reduces the risk of sexual transmission, but little is known about the efficacy of cART for decreasing genital tract viral load (GTVL) and differences in sex or HIV-1 subtype.
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Associations between genital tract infections, genital tract inflammation, and cervical cytobrush HIV-1 DNA in US versus Kenyan women.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2013
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Cervical shedding of HIV-1 DNA may influence HIV-1 sexual transmission. HIV-1 DNA was detected in 250 (80%) of 316 and 207 (79%) of 259 cervical cytobrush specimens from 56 US and 80 Kenyan women, respectively. Plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration was associated with increased HIV-1 DNA shedding among US and Kenyan women. Kenyan women had higher cervicovaginal concentrations of proinflammatory interleukins (IL)-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and anti-inflammatory secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor compared with US women (all P < 0.01). HIV-1 DNA shedding was associated with increased concentrations of IL-1? and IL-6 and lower secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor among US women but not Kenyan women.
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Development of a novel codon-specific polymerase chain reaction for the detection of CXCR4-utilizing HIV type 1 subtype B.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2013
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Insight concerning the switch in HIV-1 coreceptor use will lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis and host-virus dynamics. Predicting CXCR4 utilization by analyzing HIV-1 envelope consensus sequences is highly specific, but minority variants in the viral population are often missed resulting in low sensitivity. Commercial phenotypic assays are costly, and the development of sensitive in-house phenotypic assays to detect CXCR4-using HIV may not be feasible for some laboratories. A sensitive, inexpensive genotyping assay was developed to detect viral sequences associated with CXCR4-utilizing virus (X4). Codon-specific primer pairs were used to detect X4-associated codons at five positions in the HIV-1 envelope V3 loop (11, 13, 24, 25, and 32). Sixty plasma samples from HIV-1-infected individuals were analyzed by consensus sequencing and codon-specific PCR (CS-PCR). Forty-six of these were also phenotyped by Trofile or Enhanced Sensitivity Trofile (ESTA). CS-PCR detected X4 variants 17% more often than 11/24/25 consensus sequencing alone (n=60), 30% more often than Trofile (n=27), and in a limited data set, 16% more often than ESTA (n=19). CS-PCR combined with consensus sequencing had approximately 80% concordance with ESTA.
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Effect of the levonorgestrel intrauterine device on genital HIV-1 RNA shedding among HIV-1-infected women not taking antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2013
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The effect of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) on genital HIV-1 RNA shedding and inflammation among 25 HIV-infected women was evaluated. Blood, endocervical, and cervicovaginal lavage samples were collected from HIV-infected women not taking antiretrovirals before LNG-IUD insertion and 1 month, 3 month, and 6 months thereafter. HIV-1 RNA was quantitated by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Inflammatory markers were measured by enzyme immunoassay. Genital HIV-1 RNA shedding and inflammatory markers did not differ between LNG-IUD placement and month 6, with the exception of interleukin 1? that increased (0.42 log10; 95% confidence interval: 0.10 to 0.75). The LNG-IUD did not increase genital HIV-1 RNA shedding after 6 months of use.
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Human immunodeficiency viruses appear compartmentalized to the female genital tract in cross-sectional analyses but genital lineages do not persist over time.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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Whether unique human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV) genotypes occur in the genital tract is important for vaccine development and management of drug resistant viruses. Multiple cross-sectional studies suggest HIV is compartmentalized within the female genital tract. We hypothesize that bursts of HIV replication and/or proliferation of infected cells captured in cross-sectional analyses drive compartmentalization but over time genital-specific viral lineages do not form; rather viruses mix between genital tract and blood.
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Use of hormonal contraceptives and risk of HIV-1 transmission: a prospective cohort study.
Lancet Infect Dis
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2011
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Hormonal contraceptives are used widely but their effects on HIV-1 risk are unclear. We aimed to assess the association between hormonal contraceptive use and risk of HIV-1 acquisition by women and HIV-1 transmission from HIV-1-infected women to their male partners.
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Immune activation in the female genital tract during HIV infection predicts mucosal CD4 depletion and HIV shedding.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2011
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Plasma viral load predicts genital tract human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) shedding in HIV-infected women. We investigated whether local mucosal T-cell activation (HLA-DR, CD38, CCR5, and Ki67) contributed to HIV shedding in the genital tracts of HIV-infected women. We showed that cervical cytobrush-derived T cells expressed higher frequencies of T-cell activation markers (CD38+ and HLA-DR+) than blood-derived T cells. Expression was significantly higher in HIV-infected women than in uninfected women. We found that the frequency of activated proliferating cervical T cells (Ki67+; Ki67+CCR5+) broadly predicted HIV shedding in the genital tract in HIV-infected women, independently of plasma viral loads. Furthermore, activated cervical T cells (HLA-DR+CD38+ and HLA-DR+CCR5+) and local HIV shedding were independently associated with CD4 depletion in the genital tract. These data suggest that the presence of high frequencies of activated T cells in the female genital mucosa during HIV infection facilitates both local HIV shedding and CD4 T-cell depletion.
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Topical penile microbicide use by men to prevent recurrent bacterial vaginosis in sex partners: a randomized clinical trial.
Sex Transm Dis
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Bacterial vaginosis (BV) recurs frequently after metronidazole treatment. This randomized, single-masked clinical trial evaluated the efficacy of topical application of 62% ethyl alcohol in emollient gel (gel) to the penis by male partners of women diagnosed with BV for preventing post-treatment BV recurrence.
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Transmitted HIV resistance to first-line antiretroviral therapy in Lima, Peru.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2011
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Transmission of drug-resistant HIV (TDR) has been associated with virologic failure of "first-line," nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). A national ART program began in Peru in 2004. We evaluated the prevalence of TDR in individuals initiating ART and their virologic outcome during 2 years of ART. HIV-infected, ARV-naive subjects who met criteria to start ART in Lima, Peru were enrolled in a longitudinal observational study between July 2007 and February 2009. Blood plasma and cells obtained prior to ART initiation were assessed for antiretroviral (ARV) resistance by an oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) sensitive to 2% mutant at reverse transcriptase (RT) codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, and M184V and a subset by consensus sequencing. A total of 112 participants were enrolled; the mean CD4 was 134 ± 89 cells/?l and the median plasma HIV RNA was 93,556 copies/ml (IQR 62,776-291,364). Drug resistance mutations conferring high-level resistance to ARV were rare, detected in one of 96 (1%) evaluable participants. This subject had the Y181C mutation detected in both plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at a concentration of 100% by OLA and consensus sequencing; nevertheless nevirapine-ART suppressed her viral replication. Consensus sequencing of 37 (19%) participants revealed multiple polymorphisms that occasionally have been associated with low-level reductions in ARV susceptibility. A low prevalence of TDR was detected among Peruvians initiating ART. Given the increasing availability of ART, continuing surveillance is needed to determine if TDR increases and the mutant codons associated with virologic failure.
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Characteristics of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled in a clinical trial of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2011
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Stable heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa have high HIV-1 transmission rates and are a critical population for evaluation of new HIV-1 prevention strategies. The Partners PrEP Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir and emtricitabine-tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis to decrease HIV-1 acquisition within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. We describe the trial design and characteristics of the study cohort.
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Genital HIV-1 RNA predicts risk of heterosexual HIV-1 transmission.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2011
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High plasma HIV-1 RNA concentrations are associated with an increased risk of HIV-1 transmission. Although plasma and genital HIV-1 RNA concentrations are correlated, no study has evaluated the relationship between genital HIV-1 RNA and the risk of heterosexual HIV-1 transmission. In a prospective study of 2521 African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, we assessed genital HIV-1 RNA quantity and HIV-1 transmission risk. HIV-1 transmission linkage was established within the partnership by viral sequence analysis. We tested endocervical samples from 1805 women, including 46 who transmitted HIV-1 to their partner, and semen samples from 716 men, including 32 who transmitted HIV-1 to their partner. There was a correlation between genital and plasma HIV-1 RNA concentrations: For endocervical swabs, Spearmans rank correlation coefficient ? was 0.56, and for semen, ? was 0.55. Each 1.0 log(10) increase in genital HIV-1 RNA was associated with a 2.20-fold (for endocervical swabs: 95% confidence interval, 1.60 to 3.04) and a 1.79-fold (for semen: 95% confidence interval, 1.30 to 2.47) increased risk of HIV-1 transmission. Genital HIV-1 RNA independently predicted HIV-1 transmission risk after adjusting for plasma HIV-1 quantity (hazard ratio, 1.67 for endocervical swabs and 1.68 for semen). Seven female-to-male and four male-to-female HIV-1 transmissions (incidence <1% per year) occurred from persons with undetectable genital HIV-1 RNA, but in all 11 cases, plasma HIV-1 RNA was detected. Thus, higher genital HIV-1 RNA concentrations are associated with greater risk of heterosexual HIV-1 transmission, and this effect was independent of plasma HIV-1 concentrations. These data suggest that HIV-1 RNA in genital secretions could be used as a marker of HIV-1 sexual transmission risk.
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Postpartum viral load rebound in HIV-1-infected women treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol A5150.
HIV Clin Trials
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
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Pregnancy may lead to increases in HIV-1 RNA levels postpartum. The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5150 study was designed to characterize the incidence of viral load rebound during the immediate 24 weeks postpartum and explore factors associated with viral load rebound.
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Post-prostatic massage fluid/urine as an alternative to semen for studying male genitourinary HIV-1 shedding.
Sex Transm Infect
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2011
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Genitourinary tract samples are required to investigate male HIV-1 infectivity. Because semen collection is often impractical, the acceptability, feasibility and validity of post-prostatic massage fluid/urine (post-PMF/U) was evaluated for studying male genitourinary HIV-1 shedding.
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Estimating volume of cervicovaginal secretions in cervicovaginal lavage fluid collected for measurement of genital HIV-1 RNA levels in women.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-24-2010
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To assess the volume of genital fluid collected for measuring the HIV-1 RNA level in cervicovaginal fluid, phosphate-buffered saline containing 10 mM LiCl was used. Thirty-eight women provided 275 cervicovaginal specimens. The estimated median volume of cervicovaginal fluid was 0.51 ml (interquartile range, 0.33, 0.69).
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Cervicovaginal shedding of HIV type 1 is related to genital tract inflammation independent of changes in vaginal microbiota.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2010
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We examined the relationship of proinflammatory vaginal cytokines and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) with genital HIV-1 shedding after controlling for genital coinfections. Fifty-seven HIV-1-infected women in Seattle, WA (n?=?38) and Rochester, NY (n?=?19) were followed every 3-4 months for a total of 391 visits. At each visit, plasma and cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) were tested for HIV-1 RNA using qPCR. Vaginal samples were tested for bacterial vaginosis, yeast, hydrogen peroxide-producing Lactobacillus colonization, Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis, CMV, and HSV shedding. CVL interleukins (IL)-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and SLPI were measured using ELISA. Linear regression with generalized estimating equations examined effects of cytokine concentrations on CVL HIV-1 RNA, adjusted for plasma HIV RNA, and measured coinfections. CVL IL-1? and IL-8 were significantly associated with CVL HIV-1 RNA. This persisted after adjusting for plasma HIV-1 RNA. Higher levels of IL-1? were associated with higher concentrations of HIV-1 RNA in CVL (??=?0.25, 95% CI 0.09, 0.42), as were higher levels of IL-8 (??=?0.34, 95% CI 0.17, 0.50). Adjusting for the presence of the coinfections described, this relationship was attenuated for IL-1? (??=?0.16; 95% CI -0.01, 0.33) but still significant for IL-8 (??=?0.29; 95% CI 0.13, 0.45). The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1? and IL-8 are associated with higher cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA concentrations, even after controlling for plasma viral load and vaginal microbial cofactors. This association suggests that there may be additional, noninfectious causes of inflammation that increase cervicovaginal HIV-1 shedding.
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Effect of acyclovir on HIV-1 set point among herpes simplex virus type 2-seropositive persons during early HIV-1 infection.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2010
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We evaluated whether acyclovir suppression during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition reduces HIV-1 set point, increases CD4 cell counts, and selects reverse-transcriptase mutations among 76 HIV-1 seroconverters identified in a placebo-controlled trial of twice-daily acyclovir (400 mg) for the prevention of HIV acquisition in herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-seropositive persons (HIV Prevention Trials Network study 039). We found no significant difference in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (P =.30) or CD4 cell counts (P =.85) between the acyclovir and placebo recipients. V75I and other mutations in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase reported from in vitro acyclovir studies were not observed. In conclusion, acyclovir suppression during HIV-1 seroconversion and the subsequent 6 months does not affect HIV-1 set point.
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Vaccine-induced HIV seropositivity/reactivity in noninfected HIV vaccine recipients.
JAMA
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2010
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Induction of protective anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immune responses is the goal of an HIV vaccine. However, this may cause a reactive result in routine HIV testing in the absence of HIV infection.
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A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of abacavir intensification in HIV-1-infected adults with virologic suppression on a protease inhibitor-containing regimen.
HIV Clin Trials
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2010
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Maximizing the durability of viral suppression is a key goal of antiretroviral therapy. The objective of AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study 372A was to determine whether the intensification strategy of adding abacavir to an effective indinavir-dual nucleoside regimen would delay the time to virologic failure.
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Estimating the impact of plasma HIV-1 RNA reductions on heterosexual HIV-1 transmission risk.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2010
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The risk of sexual transmission of HIV-1 is strongly associated with the level of HIV-1 RNA in plasma making reduction in HIV-1 plasma levels an important target for HIV-1 prevention interventions. A quantitative understanding of the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 transmission risk could help predict the impact of candidate HIV-1 prevention interventions that operate by reducing plasma HIV-1 levels, such as antiretroviral therapy (ART), therapeutic vaccines, and other non-ART interventions.
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Measurement of antiretroviral drugs in the lungs of HIV-infected patients.
HIV Ther
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2010
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AIMS: Prior studies have shown that HAART is associated with decreased HIV viral load in the lungs. The correlation between antiretroviral exposure in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and virologic response was evaluated in patients starting HAART and enrolled in The AIDS Clinical Trial Group Protocol 723. MATERIALS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; METHODS: A total of 24 subjects underwent blood and BAL sampling prior to starting HAART, and after 4 and 24 weeks of HAART. Drug concentrations and HIV RNA were measured in paired plasma and BAL samples. RESULTS: Antiretroviral drugs, including efavirenz, were detectable in BAL fluid of HIV-infected subjects beginning HAART. Efavirenz was also associated with a higher likelihood of clearing HIV RNA from the lungs. CONCLUSION: These results suggest the excellent pulmonary virologic response to antiretroviral therapy may, in part, be due to penetration of antiretroviral drugs into the alveolar compartment.
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Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in HIV-1-infected women in Seattle, USA and Nairobi, Kenya: results from the Womens HIV Interdisciplinary Network (WHIN).
Int. J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2010
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HIV-infected women have a high prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and are more likely to be infected with HPV genotypes that are considered high-risk and have the potential for progressing to cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines protect against specific HPV genotypes that may not be the most important causes of dysplasia and potentially of cervical cancer in HIV-1-infected women. African women have been underrepresented in the studies of global prevalence of HPV genotypes.
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HIV type 1 fails to trigger innate immune factor synthesis in differentiated oral epithelium.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2009
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The oral mucosa is relatively resistant to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. The mechanisms contributing to this resistance remain incompletely understood, but may include HIV-induced synthesis of innate immune factors. We used fully differentiated oral epithelium as a surrogate for the oral mucosa in vivo, exposed it to X4- and R5-tropic HIV-1 in culture, and quantified mRNA expression of six innate immune factors. Neither virus increased expression of human beta defensin 2 (hBD-2) mRNA over supernatants from uninfected lymphoblast controls. HIV-1 also failed to induce mRNA of four additional innate immunity-related genes. Similar results were obtained with oral monolayer epithelial cells. Interestingly, the X4-tropic virus inhibited mRNA expression of hBD-2, and of three of the other factors, at higher dosages in the differentiated oral epithelium but not the monolayers. The failure of HIV-1 to induce innate immune factors in the differentiated epithelium was not due to a lack of tissue penetration, as we detected fluorescence-tagged virions up to 30 mum deep from the apical surface. HIV-1 does not trigger de novo innate immune factor synthesis in oral epithelium, pointing to the role of a constitutive innate immunity for protection against HIV-1 in the oral cavity.
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HIV testing in a high-incidence population: is antibody testing alone good enough?
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently recommended the expansion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. However, antibody tests have longer "window periods" after HIV acquisition than do nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs).
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Compartmentalization of HIV-1 within the female genital tract is due to monotypic and low-diversity variants not distinct viral populations.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2009
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Compartmentalization of HIV-1 between the genital tract and blood was noted in half of 57 women included in 12 studies primarily using cell-free virus. To further understand differences between genital tract and blood viruses of women with chronic HIV-1 infection cell-free and cell-associated virus populations were sequenced from these tissues, reasoning that integrated viral DNA includes variants archived from earlier in infection, and provides a greater array of genotypes for comparisons.
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Impact of combination antiretroviral therapy on cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA and neurocognitive performance.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2009
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To determine whether antiretroviral regimens with good central nervous system (CNS) penetration control HIV in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and improve cognition.
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Monotypic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotypes across the uterine cervix and in blood suggest proliferation of cells with provirus.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2009
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Understanding the dynamics and spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) within the body, including within the female genital tract with its central role in heterosexual and peripartum transmission, has important implications for treatment and vaccine development. To study HIV-1 populations within tissues, we compared viruses from across the cervix to those in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during effective and failing antiretroviral therapy (ART) and in patients not receiving ART. Single-genome sequences of the C2-V5 region of HIV-1 env were derived from PBMC and three cervical biopsies per subject. Maximum-likelihood phylogenies were evaluated for differences in genetic diversity and compartmentalization within and between cervical biopsies and PBMC. All subjects had one or more clades with genetically identical HIV-1 env sequences derived from single-genome sequencing. These sequences were from noncontiguous cervical biopsies or from the cervix and circulating PBMC in seven of eight subjects. Compartmentalization of virus between genital tract and blood was observed by statistical methods and tree topologies in six of eight subjects, and potential genital lineages were observed in two of eight subjects. The detection of monotypic sequences across the cervix and blood, especially during effective ART, suggests that cells with provirus undergo clonal expansion. Compartmentalization of viruses within the cervix appears in part due to viruses homing to and/or expanding within the cervix and is rarely due to unique viruses evolving within the genital tract. Further studies are warranted to investigate mechanisms producing monotypic viruses across tissues and, importantly, to determine whether the proliferation of cells with provirus sustain HIV-1 persistence in spite of effective ART.
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HSV suppression reduces seminal HIV-1 levels in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected men who have sex with men.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
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Suppressive herpes simplex virus (HSV) therapy can decrease plasma, cervical, and rectal HIV-1 levels in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected persons. We evaluated the effect of HSV-2 suppression on seminal HIV-1 levels.
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Characteristics of HIV-1 discordant couples enrolled in a trial of HSV-2 suppression to reduce HIV-1 transmission: the partners study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2009
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The Partners HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Study (Partners Study) is a phase III, placebo-controlled trial of daily acyclovir for genital herpes (HSV-2) suppression among HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected persons to reduce HIV-1 transmission to their HIV-1 susceptible partners, which requires recruitment of HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples. We describe the baseline characteristics of this cohort.
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Laser cutting eliminates nucleic acid cross-contamination in dried-blood-spot processing.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
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Dried blood spots (DBS) are useful for molecular assays but are prone to false positives from cross-contamination. In our malaria DBS assay, cross-contamination was encountered despite cleaning techniques suitable for HIV-1. We therefore developed a contact-free laser cutting system that effectively eliminated cross-contamination during DBS processing.
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Interaction between lactobacilli, bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria, and HIV Type 1 RNA and DNA Genital shedding in U.S. and Kenyan women.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
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Bacterial vaginosis has been associated with genital HIV-1 shedding; however, the effect of specific vaginal bacterial species has not been assessed. We tested cervicovaginal lavage from HIV-1-seropositive women for common Lactobacillus species: L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and seven BV-associated species: BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3, Leptotrichia, Sneathia, Megasphaera, and Atopobium spp. using quantitative PCR. We used linear and Poisson regression to evaluate associations between vaginal bacteria and genital HIV-1 RNA and DNA. Specimens from 54 U.S. (310 visits) and 50 Kenyan women (137 visits) were evaluated. Controlling for plasma viral load, U.S. and Kenyan women had similar rates of HIV-1 RNA (19% of visits vs. 24%; IRR=0.95; 95% CI 0.61, 1.49) and DNA shedding (79% vs. 76%; IRR=0.90; 0.78, 1.05). At visits during antiretroviral therapy (ART), the likelihood of detection of HIV-1 RNA shedding was greater with BVAB3 (IRR=3.16; 95% CI 1.36, 7.32), Leptotrichia, or Sneathia (IRR=2.13; 1.02, 4.72), and less with L. jensenii (IRR=0.39; 0.18, 0.84). At visits without ART, only L. crispatus was associated with a lower likelihood of HIV-1 RNA detection (IRR=0.6; 0.40, 0.91). Vaginal Lactobacillus species were associated with lower risk of genital HIV-1 shedding, while the presence of certain BV-associated species may increase that risk.
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HIV-1 RNA may decline more slowly in semen than in blood following initiation of efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy.
PLoS ONE
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Antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases HIV-1 RNA levels in semen and reduces sexual transmission from HIV-1-infected men. Our objective was to study the time course and magnitude of seminal HIV-1 RNA decay after initiation of efavirenz-based ART among 13 antiretroviral-naïve Kenyan men.
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Detection of hydrogen peroxide-producing Lactobacillus species in the vagina: a comparison of culture and quantitative PCR among HIV-1 seropositive women.
BMC Infect. Dis.
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The presence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) producing Lactobacillus in the vagina may play a role in controlling genital HIV-1 shedding. Sensitive molecular methods improve our ability to characterize the vaginal microbiota; however, they cannot characterize phenotype. We assessed the concordance of H(2)O(2)-producing Lactobacillus detected by culture with quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection of Lactobacillus species commonly assumed to be H(2)O(2)-producers.
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Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.
PLoS ONE
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Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.
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Validation for clinical use of a novel HIV-2 plasma RNA viral load assay using the Abbott m2000 platform.
J. Clin. Virol.
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Optimal care of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) requires an accurate assessment of HIV-2 plasma viral load (VL), but no clinically approved quantitative HIV-2 RNA VL assay exists.
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Extended follow-up confirms early vaccine-enhanced risk of HIV acquisition and demonstrates waning effect over time among participants in a randomized trial of recombinant adenovirus HIV vaccine (Step Study).
J. Infect. Dis.
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Background: The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. Methods: We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. Results: One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.92; P= .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P=1.0) over all follow-up time. Conclusions: The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.