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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Oleuropein prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy interfering with signaling molecules and cardiomyocyte metabolism.
J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Oleuropein, a natural phenolic compound, prevents acute doxorubicin (DXR)-induced cardiotoxicity but there is no evidence regarding its role in chronic DXR-induced cardiomyopathy (DXR-CM). In the present study, we investigated the role of oleuropein in DXR-CM by addressing cardiac geometry and function (transthoracic echocardiography), cardiac histopathology, nitro-oxidative stress (MDA, PCs, NT), inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, Big ET-1), NO homeostasis (iNOS and eNOS expressions), kinases involved in apoptosis and metabolism (Akt, AMPK) and myocardial metabonomics. Rats were randomly divided into 6 groups: Control, OLEU-1 and OLEU-2 [oleuropein at 1000 and 2000 mg/kg in total, respectively, intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 14 days], DXR (18 mg/kg, i.p. divided into 6 equal doses for 2 weeks), DXR-OLEU-1 and DXR-OLEU-2 (both oleuropein and DXR as previously described). Impaired left ventricular contractility and inflammatory and degenerative pathology lesions were encountered only in the DXR group. The DXR group also had higher MDA, PCs, NT, IL-6 and Big ET-1 levels, higher iNOS and lower eNOS, Akt and AMPK activation compared to controls and the oleuropein-treated groups. Metabonomics depicted significant metabolite alterations in the DXR group suggesting perturbed energy metabolism and protein biosynthesis. The effectiveness of DXR in inhibiting cell proliferation is not compromised when oleuropein is present. We documented an imbalance between iNOS and eNOS expressions and a disturbed protein biosynthesis and metabolism in DXR-CM; these newly recognized pathways in DXR cardiotoxicity may help identifying novel therapeutic targets. Activation of AMPK and suppression of iNOS by oleuropein seem to prevent the structural, functional and histopathological cardiac effects of chronic DXR toxicity.
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Bone metabolism compensates for the delayed growth in small for gestational age neonates.
Organogenesis
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The goal of the present study is to investigate the relationship between anthropometric and bone metabolism markers in a sample of neonates and their mothers. A sample of 20 SGA (small for the gestational age), AGA (appropriate for the gestational age) and LGA (large for the gestational age) term neonates and their 20 mothers was analyzed at birth and at exit. Elisa method was used to measure the OPG (Osteoprotegerin), RANK (Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB), RANKL (Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB Ligand), IGF-1 (Insulin-like growth factor 1), IGFBP3 (Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3) and Leptin levels. Birth weight and length were positively correlated with RANKL, IGF-1 and IGFBP3 and negatively with the ratio OPG/RANKL. SGA neonates presented lower RANKL values and higher OPG/RANKL ratio while LGA neonates had higher RANK levels than AGA neonates. Positive association was shown between neonatal IGFBP3 and maternal IGF-1 values and between neonatal and maternal RANK values at birth and at exit. These results reveal a remarkable upregulation of OPG/RANKL ratio in SGA neonates, pointing out the role of bone turnover in compensating for the delayed neonatal growth.
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Calcium and vitamin D supplementation through fortified dairy products counterbalances seasonal variations of bone metabolism indices: the Postmenopausal Health Study.
Eur J Nutr
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2010
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To assess the effectiveness of a dietary intervention combined with fortified dairy products on bone metabolism and bone mass indices in postmenopausal women.
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Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by adiponectin rescues salivary gland epithelial cells from spontaneous and interferon-gamma-induced apoptosis.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2010
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Primary Sjögrens syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltrates associated with destruction of salivary gland epithelial cells (SGECs) induced mainly by apoptosis. Adiponectin is an immunoregulatory hormone. We have previously shown that SGECs from patients with primary SS as well as from controls differentially express adiponectin. SGECs derived from patients with primary SS constitutively produce and secrete adiponectin in higher quantities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adiponectin on the proliferation and apoptosis of SGECs.
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MG-63 osteoblast-like cells enhance the osteoprotegerin expression of PC-3 prostate cancer cells.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2009
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Osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression participates in the pathophysiology of osteoblastic metastasis in prostate cancer.
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Comparison of two schemes of small bowel preparation for capsule endoscopy with polyethylene glycol: a prospective, randomized single-blind study.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2009
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Small bowel preparation for capsule endoscopy remains controversial. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of 2 and 4 l of polyethylene glycol.
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IL-6 and PPARgamma signalling in human PC-3 prostate cancer cells.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2009
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Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands and interleukin (IL)-6 are key factors for controlling prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival.
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Changes in parameters of bone metabolism in postmenopausal women following a 12-month intervention period using dairy products enriched with calcium, vitamin D, and phylloquinone (vitamin K(1)) or menaquinone-7 (vitamin K (2)): the Postmenopausal Health S
Calcif. Tissue Int.
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The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of dairy products enriched with calcium, vitamin D(3), and phylloquinone (vitamin K(1)) or menaquinone-7 (vitamin K(2)) on parameters of bone metabolism in postmenopausal women following a 12-month intervention. Postmenopausal women were divided into three intervention groups and a control group (CG). All three intervention groups attended biweekly sessions and received fortified dairy products providing daily 800 mg of calcium and 10 ?g of vitamin D(3) (CaD). Furthermore, in two of the three intervention groups the dairy products were also enriched with vitamin K, providing daily 100 ?g of either phylloquinone (CaDK1) or menaquinone-7 (CaDK2). The increase observed for serum 25(OH)D levels in all intervention groups and the increase observed for serum IGF-I levels in the CaDK2 group differed significantly compared to the changes observed in CG (P = 0.010 and P = 0.028, respectively). Furthermore, both the CaDK1 and CaDK2 groups had a significantly lower mean serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin to osteocalcin ratio and urine deoxypyridinoline levels at follow-up compared to the CaD and CG groups (P = 0.001 and P = 0.047, respectively). Significant increases in total-body BMD were observed in all intervention groups compared to CG (P < 0.05), while significant increases in lumbar spine BMD were observed only for CaDK1 and CaDK2 compared to CG (P < 0.05) after controlling for changes in serum 25(OH)D levels and dietary calcium intake. In conclusion, the present study revealed more favorable changes in bone metabolism and bone mass indices for the two vitamin K-supplemented groups, mainly reflected in the suppression of serum levels of bone remodeling indices and in the more positive changes in lumbar spine BMD for these two study groups.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.