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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
In vitro and in vivo characterization of irreversible mutant-selective EGFR inhibitors that are wild-type sparing.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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Patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) with activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) initially respond well to the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib. However, all patients relapse because of the emergence of drug-resistant mutations, with T790M mutations accounting for approximately 60% of all resistance. Second-generation irreversible EGFR inhibitors are effective against T790M mutations in vitro, but retain affinity for wild-type EGFR (EGFR(WT)). These inhibitors have not provided compelling clinical benefit in T790M-positive patients, apparently because of dose-limiting toxicities associated with inhibition of EGFR(WT). Thus, there is an urgent clinical need for therapeutics that overcome T790M drug resistance while sparing EGFR(WT). Here, we describe a lead optimization program that led to the discovery of four potent irreversible 2,4-diaminopyrimidine compounds that are EGFR mutant (EGFR(mut)) selective and have been designed to have low affinity for EGFR(WT). Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in H1975 tumor-bearing mice showed that exposure was dose proportional resulting in dose-dependent EGFR modulation. Importantly, evaluation of normal lung tissue from the same animals showed no inhibition of EGFR(WT). Of all the compounds tested, compound 3 displayed the best efficacy in EGFR(L858R/T790M)-driven tumors. Compound 3, now renamed CO-1686, is currently in a phase I/II clinical trial in patients with EGFR(mut)-advanced NSCLC that have received prior EGFR-directed therapy.
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Discovery of a Mutant-Selective Covalent Inhibitor of EGFR that Overcomes T790M-Mediated Resistance in NSCLC.
Cancer Discov
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2013
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Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations initially respond to first-generation reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, clinical efficacy is limited by acquired resistance, frequently driven by the EGFR(T790M) mutation. CO-1686 is a novel, irreversible, and orally delivered kinase inhibitor that specifically targets the mutant forms of EGFR, including T790M, while exhibiting minimal activity toward the wild-type (WT) receptor. Oral administration of CO-1686 as single agent induces tumor regression in EGFR-mutated NSCLC tumor xenograft and transgenic models. Minimal activity of CO-1686 against the WT EGFR receptor was observed. In NSCLC cells with acquired resistance to CO-1686 in vitro, there was no evidence of additional mutations or amplification of the EGFR gene, but resistant cells exhibited signs of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and demonstrated increased sensitivity to AKT inhibitors. These results suggest that CO-1686 may offer a novel therapeutic option for patients with mutant EGFR NSCLC.
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Inhibition of Btk with CC-292 provides early pharmacodynamic assessment of activity in mice and humans.
J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2013
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Targeted therapies that suppress B cell receptor (BCR) signaling have emerged as promising agents in autoimmune disease and B cell malignancies. Brutons tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays a crucial role in B cell development and activation through the BCR signaling pathway and represents a new target for diseases characterized by inappropriate B cell activity. N-(3-(5-fluoro-2-(4-(2-methoxyethoxy)phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl)acrylamide (CC-292) is a highly selective, covalent Btk inhibitor and a sensitive and quantitative assay that measures CC-292-Btk engagement has been developed. This translational pharmacodynamic assay has accompanied CC-292 through each step of drug discovery and development. These studies demonstrate the quantity of Btk bound by CC-292 correlates with the efficacy of CC-292 in vitro and in the collagen-induced arthritis model of autoimmune disease. Recently, CC-292 has entered human clinical trials with a trial design that has provided rapid insight into safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. This first-in-human healthy volunteer trial has demonstrated that a single oral dose of 2 mg/kg CC-292 consistently engaged all circulating Btk protein and provides the basis for rational dose selection in future clinical trials. This targeted covalent drug design approach has enabled the discovery and early clinical development of CC-292 and has provided support for Btk as a valuable drug target for B-cell mediated disorders.
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Discovery of a potent and isoform-selective targeted covalent inhibitor of the lipid kinase PI3K?.
J. Med. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2013
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PI3K? has been identified as an oncogene in human tumors. By use of rational drug design, a targeted covalent inhibitor 3 (CNX-1351) was created that potently and specifically inhibits PI3K?. We demonstrate, using mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography, that the selective inhibitor covalently modifies PI3K? on cysteine 862 (C862), an amino acid unique to the ? isoform, and that PI3K?, -?, and -? are not covalently modified. 3 is able to potently (EC(50) < 100 nM) and specifically inhibit signaling in PI3K?-dependent cancer cell lines, and this leads to a potent antiproliferative effect (GI(50) < 100 nM). A covalent probe, 8 (CNX-1220), which selectively bonds to PI3K?, was used to investigate the duration of occupancy of 3 with PI3K? in vivo. This is the first report of a PI3K?-selective inhibitor, and these data demonstrate the biological impact of selectively targeting PI3K?.
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Transition states and energetics of nucleophilic additions of thiols to substituted ?,?-unsaturated ketones: substituent effects involve enone stabilization, product branching, and solvation.
J. Org. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2011
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CBS-QB3 enthalpies of reaction have been computed for the conjugate additions of MeSH to six ?,?-unsaturated ketones. Compared with addition to methyl vinyl ketone, the reaction becomes 1-3 kcal mol(-1) less exothermic when an ?-Me, ?-Me, or ?-Ph substituent is present on the C=C bond. The lower exothermicity for the substituted enones occurs because the substituted reactant is stabilized more by hyperconjugation or conjugation than the product is stabilized by branching. Substituent effects on the activation energies for the rate-determining step of the thiol addition (reaction of the enone with MeS(-)) were also computed. Loss of reactant stabilization, and not steric hindrance, is the main factor responsible for controlling the relative activation energies in the gas phase. The substituent effects are further magnified in solution; in water (simulated by CPCM calculations), the addition of MeS(-) to an enone is disfavored by 2-6 kcal mol(-1) when one or two methyl groups are present on the C=C bond (??G(‡)). The use of CBS-QB3 gas-phase energies in conjunction with CPCM solvation corrections provides kinetic data in good agreement with experimental substituent effects. When the energetics of the thiol additions were calculated with several popular density functional theory and ab initio methods (B3LYP, MPW1PW91, B1B95, PBE0, B2PLYP, and MP2), some substantial inaccuracies were noted. However, M06-2X (with a large basis set), B2PLYP-D, and SCS-MP2 gave results within 1 kcal mol(-1) of the CBS-QB3 benchmark values.
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The resurgence of covalent drugs.
Nat Rev Drug Discov
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2011
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Covalent drugs have proved to be successful therapies for various indications, but largely owing to safety concerns, they are rarely considered when initiating a target-directed drug discovery project. There is a need to reassess this important class of drugs, and to reconcile the discordance between the historic success of covalent drugs and the reluctance of most drug discovery teams to include them in their armamentarium. This review surveys the prevalence and pharmacological advantages of covalent drugs, discusses how potential risks and challenges may be addressed through innovative design, and presents the broad opportunities provided by targeted covalent inhibitors.
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Selective irreversible inhibition of a protease by targeting a noncatalytic cysteine.
Nat. Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2010
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Designing selective inhibitors of proteases has proven problematic, in part because pharmacophores that confer potency exploit the conserved catalytic apparatus. We developed a fundamentally different approach by designing irreversible inhibitors that target noncatalytic cysteines that are structurally unique to a target in a protein family. We have successfully applied this approach to the important therapeutic target HCV protease, which has broad implications for the design of other selective protease inhibitors.
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Targeted covalent drugs of the kinase family.
Curr Opin Chem Biol
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2010
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In the past decade tremendous progress has been made toward a new class of therapeutics termed targeted covalent drugs, in which structure-based approaches are employed to create small molecules that inactivate their protein target through targeted covalent attachment to a specific cysteine. In the kinase field, this approach is demonstrating promise in overcoming the potency, selectivity, and efficacy challenges currently faced by reversible kinase inhibitors, with several advancing into late stage clinical testing. This design paradigm has been successfully applied to making drug candidates for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Her2, and Brutons tyrosine kinase (Btk). Here we review recent pre-clinical and clinical advances with targeted covalent kinase inhibitors, and the potential for broader application of the approach.
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Acylating drugs: redesigning natural covalent inhibitors.
Curr Opin Chem Biol
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2010
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Structural modification of naturally occurring beta-lactams and beta-lactones is a highly effective strategy for generating drugs for treating bacterial infections, cancer, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. These drugs acylate catalytic amino acids (serine, threonine, or cysteine) in enzyme targets such as penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), beta-lactamases, lipases, HMG-CoA reductase, fatty acid synthetase, and the 20S proteasome. Optimally performing drugs combine features of high target affinity, chemoselective reactivity, and high stability of the acylated target protein. This review provides a perspective on these two classes of acylating agents and summarizes recent advances in mechanism and structure-based design of acylating drugs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.