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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Life-threatening expansive sublingual hematoma: a stab wound with lingual artery injury.
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2014
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Vascular injuries are a constant risk in facial trauma, although bone and soft tissues of the face have provided some protection to the larger blood vessels. However, penetrating injuries usually do not have this type of protection and can damage significant vascular arteries. This article presents a case of a stab wound, which led to airway obstruction arising to a large sublingual hematoma due to lingual artery injury. A healthy 44-year-old man was stabbed in the submandibular region and admitted with an airway obstruction. He was subjected to an emergency tracheotomy and evolved with progressive sublingual edema. Computed tomography (CT) angiography showed a left lingual artery injury with the formation of an expansive hematoma. The CT angiography findings helped to identify the cause of the hematoma and guided the surgery to drain the hematoma after ligation of the lingual artery. The treatment was safely performed as planned and evolved uneventfully. The patient recovered fast and well and presented normal functions 6 months after the treatment. This surgical technique is an effective method for treating such injuries because it can be safely performed when guided by CT angiography. The authors argue that the demand for vascular lesions should be routine in patients who have facial trauma.
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Solitary giant neurofibroma of the mental nerve: a trauma-related lesion?
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2013
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Neurofibroma is a benign neoplasm derived from peripheral nerves whose etiology is still unclear. It may present as a solitary lesion or be associated with other diseases such as neurofibromatosis type I and II syndrome. This paper aims to report an extremely rare case of a solitary giant neurofibroma of the mental nerve whose etiology was related to a local trauma. A 14-year-old female patient presented an extensive left facial mass with a size of 7 × 5 × 4 cm, located between the teeth 33 and 37 in the mandible region. It has begun to grow 3 months after a local trauma. Imaging studies were suggestive of a soft-tissue lesion, with minimal bone changes and maintaining the integrity of the mandibular canal and mental foramen. Histopathological tests showed spindle cells with undulated and hyperchromatic nuclei, and sparse cytoplasm in a stroma composed of dense fibrous connective tissue. Immunohistochemistry revealed positive expression for the proteins S-100 and vimentin, confirming the diagnosis of neurofibroma. The patient underwent surgical removal of the lesion by intraoral approach and evolved with an excellent cosmetic result and no signs of recurrence after 2 years of follow up. We report a rare case of solitary giant neurofibroma whose etiology was related to a local trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a mental nerve neurofibroma. Although the etiology remains unclear, we suggest the investigation of local trauma as a possible etiologic factor for solitary neurofibromas of the jaw.
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Virulence factors of Candida albicans isolates from the oral cavities of HIV-1-positive patients.
Curr. HIV Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2013
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The present study assessed the phenotypic aspects of oral-cavity Candida albicans isolates from 300 HIV-1- positive patients, relating the most commonly investigated virulence factors (enzyme typing and germ-tube formation) to the most common morphotypes. The samples were seeded into specific media for isolation and subsequent identification using the automated Vitek 2 system. The following assays were performed for phenotypic characterization: morphotyping, germ-tube formation and enzyme typing. Out of 300 collected samples, 144 tested positive for yeasts of the Candida genus, 98 (32.7 %) of which were identified as C. albicans. The latter samples were attributed to seven different morphotypes; the three most common morphotypes were 7208 (49 %), 7308 (14.3 %) and 3208 (13.3 %). All of the C. albicans isolate samples formed germ tubes and produced the enzymes proteinase and phospholipase, with an activity classified as intermediate to high. Due to the identification of virulence factors among the analyzed samples, monitoring of HIV-1-positive patients colonized by different morphotypes must be established because these morphotypes are extremely pathogenic and can trigger severe fungal infections.
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Oral capillary hemangioma: A clinical protocol of diagnosis and treatment in adults.
Oral Maxillofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2013
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Hemangiomas are benign vascular anomalies characterized by benign proliferation of blood vessels. There are no well-defined criteria for the diagnosis and treatment of oral capillary hemangioma (OCH). The objective of this study is to report a safe, effective, and low-cost protocol for diagnosis and treatment of OCH.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.