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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Targeted sequencing using a 47 gene multiple myeloma mutation panel (M(3) P) in -17p high risk disease.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2014
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We constructed a multiple myeloma (MM)-specific gene panel for targeted sequencing and investigated 72 untreated high-risk (del17p) MM patients. Mutations were identified in 78% of the patients. While the majority of studied genes were mutated at similar frequency to published literature, the prevalence of TP53 mutation was increased (28%) and no mutations were found in FAM46C. This study provides a comprehensive insight into the mutational landscape of del17p high-risk MM. Additionally, our work demonstrates the practical use of a customized sequencing panel, as an easy, cheap and fast approach to characterize the mutational profile of MM.
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Whole genome analyses of a well-differentiated liposarcoma reveals novel SYT1 and DDR2 rearrangements.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma, but little is known about the genomic basis of this disease. Given the low cell content of this tumor type, we utilized flow cytometry to isolate the diploid normal and aneuploid tumor populations from a well-differentiated liposarcoma prior to array comparative genomic hybridization and whole genome sequencing. This work revealed massive highly focal amplifications throughout the aneuploid tumor genome including MDM2, a gene that has previously been found to be amplified in well-differentiated liposarcoma. Structural analysis revealed massive rearrangement of chromosome 12 and 11 gene fusions, some of which may be part of double minute chromosomes commonly present in well-differentiated liposarcoma. We identified a hotspot of genomic instability localized to a region of chromosome 12 that includes a highly conserved, putative L1 retrotransposon element, LOC100507498 which resides within a gene cluster (NAV3, SYT1, PAWR) where 6 of the 11 fusion events occurred. Interestingly, a potential gene fusion was also identified in amplified DDR2, which is a potential therapeutic target of kinase inhibitors such as dastinib, that are not routinely used in the treatment of patients with liposarcoma. Furthermore, 7 somatic, damaging single nucleotide variants have also been identified, including D125N in the PTPRQ protein. In conclusion, this work is the first to report the entire genome of a well-differentiated liposarcoma with novel chromosomal rearrangements associated with amplification of therapeutically targetable genes such as MDM2 and DDR2.
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Hypodiploid multiple myeloma is characterized by more aggressive molecular markers than non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2013
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Multiple myeloma can be categorized into hyperdiploid or non-hyperdiploid myeloma based on the number of chromosomes found in the tumor clone. Among the non-hyperdiploid myelomas, the hypodiploid subtype has the most aggressive clinical phenotype, but the genetic differences between groups are not completely defined. In order to understand the genetic background of hypodiploid multiple myeloma better, we compared the genomic (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) and transcriptomic (gene expression profiling) background of 49 patients with hypodiploid myeloma with 50 other non-hyperdiploid and 125 hyperdiploid myeloma patients. There were significant chromosomal and gene expression differences between hyperdiploid patients and non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients. Non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients shared most of the chromosomal abnormalities; nevertheless a subset of these abnormalities, such as monosomies 13, 14 and 22, was markedly increased in hypodiploid patients. Furthermore, deletions of 1p, 12p, 16q and 17p, all associated with poor outcome or progression in multiple myeloma, were significantly enriched in hypodiploid patients. Molecular risk-stratification indices reinforce the worse prognosis associated with hypodiploid multiple myeloma compared with non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma. Gene expression profiling clustered hypodiploid and non-hyperdiploid subgroups closer than hyperdiploid myeloma but also highlighted the up-regulation of CCND2, WHSC1/MMSET and FGFR3 in the hypodiploid subtype. In summary, hypodiploid multiple myeloma is genetically similar to non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma but characterized by a higher prevalence of genetic alterations associated with poor outcome and disease progression. It is provocative to hypothesize that hypodiploid multiple myeloma is an advanced stage of non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma.
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Uncovering the biology of multiple myeloma among African Americans: a comprehensive genomics approach.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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Epidemiological data have suggested that African American (AA) persons are twice as likely to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM) compared with European American (EA) persons. Here, we have analyzed a set of cytogenetic and genomic data derived from AA and EA MM patients. We have compared the frequency of IgH translocations in a series of data from 115 AA patients from 3 studies and 353 EA patients from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) studies E4A03 and E9487. We have also interrogated tumors from 45 AA and 196 EA MM patients for somatic copy number abnormalities associated with poor outcome. In addition, 35 AA and 178 EA patients were investigated for a transcriptional profile associated with high-risk disease. Overall, based on this cohort, genetic profiles were similar except for a significantly lower frequency of IgH translocations (40% vs 52%; P = .032) in AA patients. Frequency differences of somatic copy number aberrations were not significant after correction for multiple testing. There was also no significant difference in the frequency of high-risk disease based on gene expression profiling. Our study represents the first comprehensive comparisons of the frequency and distribution of molecular alterations in MM tumors between AA and EA patients. ECOG E4A03 is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00098475. ECOG E9487 is a companion validation set to the ECOG study E9486 and is registered with the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Clinical Trials (PDQ), number EST-9486.
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Impact of high-risk classification by FISH: an eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) study E4A03.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2011
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Lenalidomide with dexamethasone is a standard induction treatment regimen for newly diagnosed myeloma (although a Federal Drug Administration indication is still absent). In the context of the Phase 3 clinical trial E4A03 (lenalidomide plus dexamethasone in low or high doses), we queried whether a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based genetic classification into high risk (HR) and standard risk (SR) multiple myeloma (MM) would remain clinically significant. Of 445 E4A03 patients, 126 had FISH analysis; 21 were classified HR with t(4;14), t(14;16), or 17p13 deletions. Median survival follow-up approached 3 years. Patients with FISH data tended to be younger and healthier compared to the rest of the study population and, consequently, had superior overall survival (OS) results. Within the FISH cohort, shorter OS in the HR versus SR group (P = 0·004) corresponded to a hazard ratio of 3·48 [95% confidence interval: (1·42-8·53)], an effect also observed in multivariate analysis. Two-year OS rates were 91% for SR MM and 76% for HR MM. There was also evidence of interaction between risk status and treatment (P = 0·026). HR patients were less likely to attain good partial response (SR 46% and HR 30%, Odds Ratio = 2·0 [0·7-5·6]), but overall response rates were not different. FISH-based risk classification retained prognostic significance in patients receiving lenalidomide-based induction.
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Cereblon expression is required for the antimyeloma activity of lenalidomide and pomalidomide.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2011
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The precise molecular mechanism of action and targets through which thalidomide and related immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) exert their antitumor effects remains unclear. We investigated the role of cereblon (CRBN), a primary teratogenic target of thalidomide, in the antimyeloma activity of IMiDs. CRBN depletion is initially cytotoxic to human myeloma cells, but surviving cells with stable CRBN depletion become highly resistant to both lenalidomide and pomalidomide, but not to the unrelated drugs bortezomib, dexamethasone, and melphalan. Acquired deletion of CRBN was found to be the primary genetic event differentiating isogenic MM1.S cell lines cultured to be sensitive or resistant to lenalidomide and pomalidomide. Gene expression changes induced by lenalidomide were dramatically suppressed in the presence of CRBN depletion, further demonstrating that CRBN is required for lenalidomide activity. Downstream targets of CRBN include interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) previously reported to also be a target of lenalidomide. Patients exposed to, and putatively resistant to, lenalidomide had lower CRBN levels in paired samples before and after therapy. In summary, CRBN is an essential requirement for IMiD activity and a possible biomarker for the clinical assessment of antimyeloma efficacy.
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Impact of gene expression profiling-based risk stratification in patients with myeloma receiving initial therapy with lenalidomide and dexamethasone.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2011
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Detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities by FISH and metaphase cytogenetics allows risk stratification in multiple myeloma; however, gene expression profiling (GEP) based signatures may enable more specific risk categorization. We examined the utility of 2 GEP-based risk stratification systems among patients undergoing initial therapy with lenalidomide in the context of a phase 3 trial. Among 45 patients studied at baseline, 7 (16%) and 10 (22%), respectively, were high-risk using the GEP70 and GEP15 signatures. The median overall survival for the GEP70 high-risk group was 19 months versus not reached for the rest (hazard ratio = 14.1). Although the medians were not reached, the GEP15 also predicted a poor outcome among the high-risk patients. The C-statistic for the GEP70, GEP15, and FISH based risk stratification systems was 0.74, 0.7, and 0.7, respectively. Here we demonstrate the prognostic value for GEP risk stratification in a group of patients primarily treated with novel agents. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00098475.
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High-resolution genomic analysis in Waldenströms macroglobulinemia identifies disease-specific and common abnormalities with marginal zone lymphomas.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2009
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Cytogenetic analyses have been historically limited in Waldenströms macroglobulinemia (WM) by the difficulty to obtain tumor metaphases. Thus, few recurrent karyotypic abnormalities have been reported and the molecular consequences of these imbalances are largely unknown. We used an array-based comparative genomic hybridization approach to better characterize the recurrent chromosome abnormalities associated with WM pathogenesis and to compare them with the publicly available findings in other B-cell neoplasias. The majority of the recurrent chromosome abnormalities identified in WM were shared with marginal zone lymphomas (MZL), as deletions of 6q23 and 13q14 and gains of 3q13-q28, 6p and 18q. On the other hand, gains of 4q and 8q were recurrently identified in WM but have not been described as being common abnormalities in MZL. The genetic consequences of these specific abnormalities remain elusive and further studies are critical to refine the search and to precise the molecular pathways affected by these abnormalities.
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Identification of copy number abnormalities and inactivating mutations in two negative regulators of nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathways in Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2009
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Waldenströms macroglobulinemia (WM) is a distinct clinicobiological entity defined as a B-cell neoplasm characterized by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in bone marrow (BM) and IgM paraprotein production. Cytogenetic analyses were historically limited by difficulty in obtaining tumor metaphases, and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly defined. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis in 42 WM patients by using a high-resolution, array-based comparative genomic hybridization approach to unravel the genetic mechanisms associated with WM pathogenesis. Overall, 83% of cases have chromosomal abnormalities, with a median of three abnormalities per patient. Gain of 6p was the second most common abnormality (17%), and its presence was always concomitant with 6q loss. A minimal deleted region, including MIRN15A and MIRN16-1, was delineated on 13q14 in 10% of patients. Of interest, we reported biallelic deletions and/or inactivating mutations with uniparental disomy in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 3 and TNFalpha-induced protein 3, two negative regulators of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. Furthermore, we confirmed the association between TRAF3 inactivation and increased transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB target genes. Mutational activation of the NF-kappaB pathway, which is normally activated by ligand receptor interactions within the BM microenvironment, highlights its biological importance, and suggests a therapeutic role for inhibitors of NF-kappaB pathway activation in the treatment of WM.
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Clonal competition with alternating dominance in multiple myeloma.
Blood
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Emerging evidence indicates that tumors can follow several evolutionary paths over a patients disease course. With the use of serial genomic analysis of samples collected at different points during the disease course of 28 patients with multiple myeloma, we found that the genomes of standard-risk patients show few changes over time, whereas those of cytogenetically high-risk patients show significantly more changes over time. The results indicate the existence of 3 temporal tumor types, which can either be genetically stable, linearly evolving, or heterogeneous clonal mixtures with shifting predominant clones. A detailed analysis of one high-risk patient sampled at 7 time points over the entire disease course identified 2 competing subclones that alternate in a back and forth manner for dominance with therapy until one clone underwent a dramatic linear evolution. With the use of the Vk*MYC genetically engineered mouse model of myeloma we modeled this competition between subclones for predominance occurring spontaneously and with therapeutic selection.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.