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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Vorinostat positively regulates synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in HIV infected neurons: role of nicotine in progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.
Mol Brain
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occurs in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. In the United States, the prevalence of cigarette smoking ranges from 35-70% in HIV-infected individuals compared to 20% in general population. Cognitive impairment in heavy cigarette smokers has been well reported. However, the synergistic effects of nicotine and HIV infection and the underlying mechanisms in the development of HAND are unknown.
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Towards nanomedicines for neuroAIDS.
Rev. Med. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in remarkable decline in the morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients, controlling HIV infections still remain a global health priority. HIV access to the CNS serves as the natural viral preserve because most antiretroviral (ARV) drugs possess inadequate or zero delivery across the brain barriers. Thus, development of target-specific, effective, safe, and controllable drug-delivery approach is an important health priority for global elimination of AIDS progression. Emergence of nanotechnology in medicine has shown exciting prospect for development of novel drug delivery systems to administer the desired therapeutic levels of ARV drugs in the CNS. Neuron-resuscitating and/or antidependence agents may also be delivered in the brain through nanocarriers to countercheck the rate of neuronal degradation during HIV infection. Several nanovehicles such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, and solid lipid nanoparticles have been intensively explored. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles and monocytes/macrophages have also been used as carrier to improve the delivery of nanoformulated ARV drugs across the blood-brain barrier. Nevertheless, more rigorous research homework has to be elucidated to sort out the shortcomings that affect the target specificity, delivery, release, and/or bioavailability of desired amount of drugs for treatment of neuroAIDS.
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A review of guidelines and pharmacologic options for asthma treatment, with a focus on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.
Phys Sportsmed
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2013
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Asthma affects millions of individuals worldwide. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is common in patients diagnosed with asthma, but may also occur in patients without chronic asthma. Patients with isolated exercise-induced bronchoconstriction may require pretreatment with inhaled short-acting ?-agonists prior to exercise. Patients diagnosed with asthma can achieve good control of the symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction with appropriate treatment of underlying chronic asthma. Current guidelines suggest staging patients with asthma based on severity of symptoms and initiating therapy according to their stage. Pharmacotherapy for asthma management consists of both quick-relief medications (short-acting ?-agonists) as well as maintenance, or long-term control, medications (inhaled corticosteroids, long-acting ?-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, cromolyn, and theophylline).
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Latest trends in drugs of abuse - HIV infection and neuroAIDS.
Future Virol
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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Drug abuse and co-occurring infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In particular, HIV infection is associated with serious neurological complications, including neuroAIDS. Therefore, on 13-15 September 2012, the OMICS Group (USA) and Shailendra K Saxena (Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, India) hosted a symposium titled: Drugs of Abuse - HIV Infection and NeuroAIDS: A Global Perspective that was cochaired by Jag H Khalsa and Jeymohan Joseph of the NIH, MD, USA, at the 3rd World Congress on Biotechnology, in Hyderabad, India. Renowned scientists from India and the USA highlighted a number of issues, including the epidemiology, causes and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of neuroAIDS, impact on health, and designing new treatment modalities (e.g., nanotherapeutics) for the treatment of neurological disorders.
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Targeted brain derived neurotropic factors (BDNF) delivery across the blood-brain barrier for neuro-protection using magnetic nano carriers: an in-vitro study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Parenteral use of drugs; such as opiates exert immunomodulatory effects and serve as a cofactor in the progression of HIV-1 infection, thereby potentiating HIV related neurotoxicity ultimately leading to progression of NeuroAIDS. Morphine exposure is known to induce apoptosis, down regulate cAMP response element-binding (CREB) expression and decrease in dendritic branching and spine density in cultured cells. Use of neuroprotective agent; brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which protects neurons against these effects, could be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of opiate addiction. Previous studies have shown that BDNF was not transported through the blood brain barrier (BBB) in-vivo.; and hence it is not effective in-vivo. Therefore development of a drug delivery system that can cross BBB may have significant therapeutic advantage. In the present study, we hypothesized that magnetically guided nanocarrier may provide a viable approach for targeting BDNF across the BBB. We developed a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) based carrier bound to BDNF and evaluated its efficacy and ability to transmigrate across the BBB using an in-vitro BBB model. The end point determinations of BDNF that crossed BBB were apoptosis, CREB expression and dendritic spine density measurement. We found that transmigrated BDNF was effective in suppressing the morphine induced apoptosis, inducing CREB expression and restoring the spine density. Our results suggest that the developed nanocarrier will provide a potential therapeutic approach to treat opiate addiction, protect neurotoxicity and synaptic density degeneration.
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Montelukast for symptom control of interstitial cystitis.
Ann Pharmacother
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2011
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To describe the effects of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist commonly used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma, on the symptoms of interstitial cystitis (IC).
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HIV-1 Tat upregulates expression of histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) in human neurons: implication for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND).
Neurochem. Int.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2011
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Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a pivotal role in epigenetic regulation of transcription and homeostasis of protein acetylation in histones and other proteins involved in chromatin remodeling. Histone hypoacetylation and transcriptional dysfunction have been shown to be associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. More recently, neuron specific overexpression of HDAC2 has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity and learning behavior in mice. However, the role of HDAC2 in development of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is not reported. Herein we report that HIV-1 Tat protein upregulate HDAC2 expression in neuronal cells leading to transcriptional repression of genes involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function thereby contributing to the progression of HAND. Our results indicate upregulation of HDAC2 by Tat treatment in dose and time dependant manner by human neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells and primary human neurons. Further, HDAC2 overexpression was associated with concomitant downregulation in CREB and CaMKIIa genes that are known to regulate neuronal activity. These observed effects were completely blocked by HDAC2 inhibition. These results for the first time suggest the possible role of HDAC2 in development of HAND. Therefore, use of HDAC2 specific inhibitor in combination with HAART may be of therapeutic value in treatment of neurocognitive disorders observed in HIV-1 infected individuals.
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Interactive role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade-specific Tat protein and cocaine in blood-brain barrier dysfunction: implications for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2010
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In recent years, increasing interest has emerged to assess the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade C viral pathogenesis due to its anticipated spread in the United States and other western countries. Previous studies suggest that clade C is less neuropathogenic than clade B; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Additionally, the interactive role of drugs of abuse such as cocaine on clade C-associated neuropathogenesis has not been reported. In the current study, we hypothesize that HIV-1 clade-specific Tat proteins exert differential effects on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and cocaine further differentially aggravates the BBB dysfunction. We evaluated the effect of Tat B and Tat C and/or cocaine on the BBB integrity using an in vitro model constructed with primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and astrocytes. The BBB membrane integrity was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran transport assay and monocytes transmigration across the BBB. Results indicate that Tat B disrupts BBB integrity to a greater extent compared to Tat C and cocaine further differentially exacerbates the BBB dysfunction. This BBB dysfunction was associated with altered expression of tight junction proteins zona occuldens (ZO-1) and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-2. Thus, these results for the first time delineate the differential role of Tat B and Tat C and/or cocaine in BBB dysfunction, which may be correlated with the clade-specific differences observed in HIV-1-associated neurological disorders.
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Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B and C Tat differentially induce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and serotonin in immature dendritic cells: Implications for neuroAIDS.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2010
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Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is commonly associated with immune dysfunctions and the suppression of antigen-presenting cells. This results in immune alterations, which could lead to impaired neuronal functions, such as neuroAIDS. The neurotoxic factor kynurenine (KYN), the rate-limiting enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), serotonin (5-HT), and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) may play a role in tryptophan deficiency and serotogenic dysfunction in neuroAIDS. HIV-1 transactivator regulatory protein (Tat) is known to play a major role in immune dysfunction. Previous studies suggest that HIV-1 B and C clades differentially manifest neuronal dysfunctions in the infected host. In the present study we examine the effect of HIV-1 B and C clade-derived Tat on IDO and 5-HTT gene and protein expressions by dendritic cells as studied by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot. In addition, the intracellular IDO expression, IDO enzyme activity, and the levels of 5-HT and KYN were also measured. Results indicate that HIV-1 clade B Tat up-regulates IDO and down-regulates 5-HTT gene and protein expressions. Further, HIV-1 clade B Tat caused a reduction of 5-HT with simultaneous increase in KYN levels as compared to HIV-1 clade C Tat. These studies suggest that HIV-1 clade B and C Tat proteins may play a differential role in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) or HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND).
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Test your skills: a worsening rash.
J Fam Pract
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
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A mother brings her 5-year-old boy in to your office because she is concerned about a rash on his legs that seems to be worsening. She tells you that he had a runny nose and a mild cough a week earlier, but that those symptoms resolved before the rash developed. He has also complained of "belly pain." The boys mother says he has been less active and more irritable since the onset of the rash, and that he is hardly eating. She also tells you that earlier in the day, her son told her that it hurts to walk. A complete review of systems is otherwise negative. The 5-year-old was born at term without complication. He has met all developmental milestones and his immunizations are up to date. He takes no medications. The boys vital signs are normal. He has an erythematous maculopapular rash distributed on his legs symmetrically; it is palpable, nontender, and nonblanching. You detect no abnormalities in abdominal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal examinations. A complete blood count (CBC) and basic metabolic panel (BMP) reveal mild leukocytosis with a normal differential. Urinalysis shows moderate blood and trace protein. Laboratory results are otherwise normal. Whats your diagnosis?
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Warfarin and bosentan interaction in a patient with pulmonary hypertension secondary to bilateral pulmonary emboli.
Clin Ther
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2010
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Bosentan is an endothelin-receptor antagonist that reportedly induces both cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and CYP2C9 enzymes, which are also involved in warfarin metabolism. We present a case report describing a probable drug interaction between warfarin and bosentan in a patient with pulmonary hypertension.
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Structural and antigenic variance between novel influenza A/H1N1/2009 and influenza A/H1N1/2008 viruses.
J Infect Dev Ctries
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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The emergence of influenza A/H1N1/2009 is alarming. The severity of previous epidemics suggests that the susceptibility of the human population to H1N1 is directly proportional to the degree of changes in hemagglutinin/HA and neuraminidase/NA; therefore, H1N1/2009 and H1N1/2008 were analyzed for their sequence as well as structural divergence.
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Effect of Onconase on double-stranded RNA in vitro.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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Onconase is a cytotoxic ribonuclease which targets tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. To date, cellular tRNA appeared to be the major target for Onconase mediated cytotoxic activity. Most recently we demonstrated that Onconase can also cleave double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Incubation of Onconase at 37 degrees C with GAPDH gene-dsRNA (approximately 440 bp long) and dsRNA ladder showed degradation of dsRNA into a spectrum of smaller dsRNA fragments. Moreover, incubation of dsRNA substrates at 40 degrees C under similar conditions markedly potentiated further cleavage of dsRNAs. The recently discovered double-stranded RNase activity of Onconase suggests another mechanism for inducing cell death/apoptosis in malignant phenotypes via the RNA interference mechanism involving siRNA and miRNA.
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Trend of Japanese encephalitis in North India: evidence from thirty-eight acute encephalitis cases and appraisal of niceties.
J Infect Dev Ctries
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2009
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In the year 2005, an epidemic of Japanese encephalitis (JE) occurred in the northern states of India. The present study was planned to reconfirm the circulation of JE in the area and to assess the trend of the disease to slow down the burden of JE.
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Paromomycin: uptake and resistance in Leishmania donovani.
Mol. Biochem. Parasitol.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
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Paromomycin is currently in phase IV clinical trials against leishmaniasis. In the present work we elucidate the effect and mechanism of uptake of paromomycin in Leishmania donovani. The in vitro sensitivities of both promastigotes and amastigotes were determined to this aminoglycoside. Association of paromomycin with L. donovani involved a rapid initial phase that was non-saturable up to 1mM of the drug. This initial phase was largely independent of temperature and not affected by metabolic inhibitors. Poly-lysine, a membrane impermeant polycation, caused profound inhibition of this association of the drug with the parasite indicating that it represented a binding of the cationic paromomycin to the negatively charged leishmanial glycocalyx. After 72h of exposure to the drug the mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly decreased, indicating that this organelle might be the ultimate target of the drug. Both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial protein synthesis were inhibited following paromomycin exposure. A line selected for resistance to the drug showed reduced paromomycin accumulation associated with a significant reduction in the initial binding to the cell surface. The drug induced reduction in membrane potential and inhibition of protein synthesis were less pronounced in the resistant strain in comparison to the wild-type.
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Modulation of HIV pathogenesis and T-cell signaling by HIV-1 Nef.
Future Virol
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HIV-1 Nef protein is an approximately 27-kDa myristoylated protein that is a virulence factor essential for efficient viral replication and infection in CD4(+) T cells. The functions of CD4(+) T cells are directly impeded after HIV infection. HIV-1 Nef plays a crucial role in manipulating host cellular machinery and in HIV pathogenesis by reducing the ability of infected lymphocytes to form immunological synapses by promoting virological synapses with APCs, and by affecting T-cell stimulation. This article reviews the current status of the efficient Nef-mediated spread of virus in the unreceptive environment of the immune system by altering CD4(+) T-lymphocyte signaling, intracellular trafficking, cell migration and apoptotic pathways.
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Interactive Effects of Morphine on HIV Infection: Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.
AIDS Res Treat
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HIV epidemic continues to be a severe public health problem and concern within USA and across the globe with about 33 million people infected with HIV. The frequency of drug abuse among HIV infected patients is rapidly increasing and is another major issue since injection drug users are at a greater risk of developing HIV associated neurocognitive dysfunctions compared to non-drug users infected with HIV. Brain is a major target for many of the recreational drugs and HIV. Evidences suggest that opiate drug abuse is a risk factor in HIV infection, neural dysfunction and progression to AIDS. The information available on the role of morphine as a cofactor in the neuropathogenesis of HIV is scanty. This review summarizes the results that help in understanding the role of morphine use in HIV infection and neural dysfunction. Studies show that morphine enhances HIV-1 infection by suppressing IL-8, downregulating chemokines with reciprocal upregulation of HIV coreceptors. Morphine also activates MAPK signaling and downregulates cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Better understanding on the role of morphine in HIV infection and mechanisms through which morphine mediates its effects may help in devising novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in opiate using HIV-infected population.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.